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French Chef

NEWS
November 7, 2002 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
Finalement. After two years of planning, more than a year of construction and months of test dinners and private parties, Bastide is open. The letter B picked out in glass beads on either side of a doorway among antique shops on Melrose Place marks the spot of chef Alain Giraud's new restaurant. Two silvery-leafed olive trees stand over a serene courtyard garden. Andree Putman, the Paris designer, has turned the small house at the back into a ravishingly chic restaurant.
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FOOD
November 28, 2001 | PHYLLIS RICHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Allo." The gravelly voice had an immutable French accent. "Jean-Louis here." That was the telephone greeting of America's first world-class French chef, when one measures those things by Michelin stars. The inspiration of many great chefs cooking today, Jean-Louis Palladin, who died Sunday, needed no last name. Like Julia or Cher. And truth be told, if Jean-Louis Palladin had been born a woman, he would have been some combination of those two.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008 | Susan Spano
You can do Paris by the numbers: Tote a favorite guidebook from point to point and read blurbs about the Arc de Triomphe or the Louvre. But to understand why Paris and its amazing landmarks matter, here's some reading that will help you embrace the city on a deeper cultural level. And you don't have to cram before you go; take one of these to peruse while you dawdle over a cafe au lait. 1. "Paris to the Moon," by Adam Gopnik (Random House Trade Paperbacks: $14.95). A New Yorker writer and his family move to Paris for front-row seats on the bistro wars and other remarkable happenings in the City of Light.
FOOD
March 5, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We are selling dreams," French chef Bernard Loiseau says. "We are merchants of happiness." For the three-star Michelin chef, one of the most celebrated of his generation, it's a risky, if rewarding, trade. Balding and with the husky build of a rugby player from his native Auvergne region in central France, the 46-year-old Loiseau is taking time to chat with a visitor before he leaves for Paris later in the day. He plans to borrow 10 million francs, or about $1.75 million U.S.
FOOD
March 5, 1997 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I'm feeling a little ticked off right now, but many of you can probably sympathize. I just spent most of the weekend--a full day and a half--preparing four dishes from three-star French chefs' cookbooks. All of you who have had the same thing happen to you, raise a hand. Better yet, raise three. That's how many you need to keep a couple of chefs' recipes in the air at the same time. Of course, this was not my first experience cooking from chefs' cookbooks.
FOOD
February 11, 1993 | LAURIE OCHOA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
" All cookery rests on the egg. The egg is the Atlas that supports the world of gastronomy; the chef is the slave of the egg. . . . And should all the hens in the world commit suicide, tomorrow every chef in France worthy of his name would fall on his spit, for . . . egg is the cement that holds all the castle of cookery together.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1997 | JUAN HOVEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who says you have to troll Ventura Boulevard to find good food? Almost 17 years ago, Juan Alonso returned home from a six-month sojourn to Europe. He'd spent two years selling real estate in Southern California, and before that he worked as chef in places like Le Petit Cafe in Hollywood, now long gone. He was at loose ends.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | KATHIE JENKINS
Fennel/Pazzia chefs Laurent Grangien and Umberto Bombana have left the Franco-Italian kitchen combo on La Cienega. Bombana, who worked at Mauro Vicenti's Pazzia since it opened five years ago, has taken a job cooking at the Ritz-Carlton in Hong Kong. He has been replaced by Enrico Trova, former sous-chef at Vicenti's elegant downtown Rex il Ristorante.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1999 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bistro cooking is the latest rage, it seems. In Los Angeles, places like Mimosa are positively jumping. Up north in the wine country, Bistro Jeanty turns away many more customers than it serves. But a few restaurants have been serving bistro food all along. Take La Fayette, an ancient place on an appropriately sleepy stretch of Garden Grove Boulevard in Garden Grove. The only thing modern about this big, dimly lit room is the towering spray of fresh flowers smack in the middle of it. Otherwise, La Fayette is all Old World charm and faded grandeur: glass chandeliers straight from the set of a Merchant-Ivory production, huge semicircular booths, empty magnums of expensive Bordeaux on the sideboards and a few Renoir prints hung over the tables nearest the kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | RUTH REICHL
Ma Be, 8722 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles. (213) 276-6223. Open for lunch Monday-Saturday, for dinner nightly and for Sunday brunch. Valet parking. Full bar. American Express, MasterCard and Visa accepted. Dinner for two, food only, $42-$72. If Ma Be were a woman, her slip would never show. She would invariably say the right thing, her children would be loved by all their teachers, and if you were her friend you'd drop in at her house at odd hours in hopes of once finding it a mess.
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