Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFrench Films
IN THE NEWS

French Films

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2012 | By Susan King
It's time to brush up on your French, because several theaters are in the Gallic way this weekend. Film Independent at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art kicks off its monthlong “French Film Fridays” at the Leo S. Bing Theater with a double bill of Jean-Luc Godard's 1963 “Contempt” with Jack Palance, Brigitte Bardot and Fritz Lang as himself, and Francois Truffaut's Hitchcockian 1969 “Mississippi Mermaid,” with Catherine Deneuve and...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lovers of French films often have limited choices at their local theaters, and traveling regularly to Paris to catch the latest titles isn't an option for many. Enter MyFrenchFilmFestival.com, a celebration of contemporary French cinema, which launched in 2011 and is now back for a third year. The 2012 event attracted 1.3 million viewings in 174 countries in just three weeks. The audience was 30 times bigger than the festival's first edition. The third edition of the online/on-demand festival, which begins Thursday, has expanded to one month, and films will be subtitled in 12 languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Turkish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013
Jay Leggett, 50, a comic actor and screenwriter who performed in television, movies and improvisational clubs, died Saturday in Lincoln County, Wis., after hunting on the opening weekend of the state's nine-day firearms deer season, authorities said. Leggett was a Wisconsin native who lived in Los Angeles. Emergency crews were called Saturday afternoon to a cabin near Tomahawk, Wis., where Leggett had returned from a deer stand on an ATV just before collapsing. Family members and paramedics performed CPR without success.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Susan King
The 17th City of Lights, City of Angels French film festival announced its most ambitious slate to date Tuesday with 38 feature films and 19 shorts. Of the 38 features, three are international premieres, 11 are North American or U.S. premieres and 16 are West Coast premieres. The festival runs April 15 to 22 at the Directors Guild Theater. Opening night will see the North American premiere of the romantic comedy "It Happened in Saint-Tropez," from director and co-writer Daniele Thompson (“Avenue Montaigne”)
NEWS
April 3, 2003
The chilling of Franco-American relations over Iraq makes this a peculiar time for a festival celebrating French cinema. But well before French President Jacques Chirac refused to say "oui" to President Bush's push for U.N. military action, plans were set for the 7th annual City of Lights/City of Angels Film Festival, which presents 11 new French features at the Directors Guild of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Discovering New French Cinema," nine films screening over the next two weekends in the County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, contains several gems made by such distinguished veterans as Claude Sautet, Alain Jessua and Claude Chabrol and is richly deserving of American distribution. A presentation of Unifrance Film, the stylish series is a welcome treat, especially at a time when French films are not shown as frequently as they once were.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The UCLA Film Archives' "Homage to the Cinematheque Francaise" continues Thursday in Melnitz Theater at 5:30 p.m. with a repeat of the delightful "Swallow and the Titmouse" (1920) and at 7:30 p.m. with "Les Films de Lumiere: 1895-1898."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
If French cinema still carries a reputation for talky chamber pieces of the bourgeoisie, here's a visceral slice of life in the raw: Whether it's the killer whales, the prominent Katy Perry song, the back-alley fighting or its unlikely romance set against day-to-day hardships in the South of France, the new "Rust and Bone" is imagistic and emotionally wrought, pushing into surprising territories. Director and co-writer Jacques Audiard's previous film, "A Prophet," was another high-pitched drama and was nominated for the foreign language Academy Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1996
A double feature of two classic French films, Chris Marker's "La Jetee" (1962) and Jean Cocteau's "Orpheus" (1949), will be shown twice, at 8 and 11 p.m. on Friday at Outsider Bookstore, 4505 Fountain Ave., between Sunset Boulevard and Vermont. Admission is $5. Information: (213) 660-4361.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Robert Abele
With the sleekly trashy misfire "Passion," Brian De Palma turns his gift for artfully decadent imitation into a kind of regrettably soulless greatest-hits packaging. Frenchman Alain Corneau's venal 2010 thriller "Love Crime" is the skeleton, its story only slightly reworked by the man behind "Dressed to Kill. " It's now Rachel McAdams as the cold-blooded corporate executive with manipulative boardroom and bedroom designs on her seemingly mousy creative underling, played here by Noomi Rapace.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
The air of compelling melancholy that hangs over all of Jean-Pierre Melville's classic policiers is especially inescapable while watching his 1972 "Un Flic. " This was the last film the director finished before dying of a heart attack at age 55, and it has many of the traits that have made him a favorite for fans of crime films in general and the French variety in particular. Melville had a celebrated cameo in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless," playing the literary celebrity interviewed by Jean Seberg who says his ambition is "to become immortal and die," a state his 13 films, including such gems as "Le Samuraï," "Army of Shadows" and "Bob le Flambeur," have enabled him to achieve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Springtime may bring thoughts of visiting Paris, but for Southern Californians without the time or means for a transatlantic getaway, there's the City of Lights, City of Angels film festival. Starting Monday, the 17th annual event at the Directors Guild of America will bring 38 French features to L.A., including the North American premiere of Danièle Thompson's new romantic comedy, "It Happened in Saint-Tropez. " Starring Monica Bellucci and Kad Merad in a romp about two cousins who fall in love with the same man, "It Happened in Saint-Tropez" will open in Paris just five days before kicking off the L.A. festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Susan King
The 17th City of Lights, City of Angels French film festival announced its most ambitious slate to date Tuesday with 38 feature films and 19 shorts. Of the 38 features, three are international premieres, 11 are North American or U.S. premieres and 16 are West Coast premieres. The festival runs April 15 to 22 at the Directors Guild Theater. Opening night will see the North American premiere of the romantic comedy "It Happened in Saint-Tropez," from director and co-writer Daniele Thompson (“Avenue Montaigne”)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
It's no wonder that Luis Buñuel wanted to turn "The Monk" into a movie. Once banned, now merely cherished, the 1796 novel is a lurid amalgam of religious devotion and sin, earthly temptations and supernatural doings. Buñuel never made his movie, but there have been numerous adaptations. The latest, from French director Dominik Moll, is a work whose elegant atmospherics ultimately overwhelm the story, even with the terrific Vincent Cassel in the title role. Moll's version, arriving stateside almost two years after it opened in France, is a decided change of pace for the director of "With a Friend Like Harry" and new territory as well for Cassel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2013 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As its title suggests, the seminal French film "Chronicle of a Summer" is a time capsule of a particular moment: Paris in 1960, the Algerian War entering its sixth year, the Holocaust still a recent wound, popular and consumer culture on the rise, and, especially among the younger population, clear signs of the discontent and frustration that would define the tumultuous decade to come. A collaboration between the anthropologist-filmmaker Jean Rouch and the sociologist Edgar Morin, "Chronicle" takes shape as a panoramic, state-of-the-nation survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Witer
Aline Issermann's "The Destiny of Juliette" and Gabriel Auer's "The Eyes of the Birds," this week's offerings in the Contemporary French Cinema series at UCLA, are both superbly made studies of individuals enduring tyranny and oppression, and both are drawn from actual experiences. Not surprisingly, they are hard to take, but they are most certainly worth the effort, instances of human suffering redeemed by beautiful imagery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Golden West College is offering two film series, one of specially captioned films for seniors and the hearing-impaired and one featuring some major figures of French movie-making. All screenings are in the Forum II theater on the campus, at 15744 Golden West St. The captioned films are being shown Tuesdays at 3 p.m. The series continues * today with "Country"; * Oct. 9 with "Eleanor and Franklin: The Early Years"; * Oct. 16 with "The Man From Snowy River"; * Oct. 23 with "High Society"; * Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lovers of French films often have limited choices at their local theaters, and traveling regularly to Paris to catch the latest titles isn't an option for many. Enter MyFrenchFilmFestival.com, a celebration of contemporary French cinema, which launched in 2011 and is now back for a third year. The 2012 event attracted 1.3 million viewings in 174 countries in just three weeks. The audience was 30 times bigger than the festival's first edition. The third edition of the online/on-demand festival, which begins Thursday, has expanded to one month, and films will be subtitled in 12 languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Turkish.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
"Amour" won the Golden Globe for best foreign language film on Sunday night. Austria's "Amour" has been an art-house awards powerhouse since winning the top prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival. Director Michael Haneke won the Golden Globe for his previous film, "The White Ribbon," and "Amour" recently racked up an impressive five Oscar nominations as well. With strong performances by Emmanuelle Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant, the film is a deeply felt, harrowing examination of an aging couple facing the end of life.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|