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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A third of French Jews are more religious today than 14 years ago. At the same time, nearly 40% of younger Jews marry outside the faith. The profile of Western Europe's largest but dwindling Jewish population is captured in a new study by the Paris-based Unified Jewish Social Fund. The survey of more than 1,000 Jews is considered the most comprehensive look in years at the Jewish community in France.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 28, 2011 | Chris Erskine
Fashionably great, the French kids pour down Aisle 2, top deck, at the bottom of the first inning. They ooh-la-la the purple mountains. They ooh-la-la the big green rug. "Let's go, Dod-jeurs!" they holler. "Take me out to zee ball game!" they sing. They fall down a lot. They are teenagers. It is part of the kismet of an old ballyard that you can be sitting there alone on a summer's night, wondering what you can do to further Franco-American relations — if anything — when in wander 25 French schoolkids to take in their very first American baseball game.
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WORLD
July 17, 2010 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
As Jeremie Fazel stood to pay his respects at his adored grandfather's grave, something felt profoundly wrong. "The name on the headstone was Benjamin Fazel. It was my grandfather's name but not the one he was born with. For me, it was very symbolic because I felt like it wasn't him," the 32-year-old Parisian said recently. "It was then I decided I had to change my name." You can call Fazel many things: He is French, the grandson and son of Jewish emigres from Poland, a documentary maker and a film editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | Geoff Boucher
Back in the summer of 1986, Kristin Scott Thomas was poised to make her feature-film debut in "Under the Cherry Moon" opposite Prince when she got pulled aside by a somewhat exasperated producer. The starlet simply wasn't exhibiting the necessary hunger for Hollywood. "He came in and said, 'We're going to do the promotion now and I need to know: Do you want to be a star?' It was a strange question to me," Scott Thomas recalled recently over lunch at a posh London restaurant. "I thought, 'Why on earth is he asking me that?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2000
Re "Apparent Spillover of Mideast Violence Hits France Hard," Oct. 20: Recently The Times has carried major stories regarding the spillover of Mideast violence into France, where 5 million Muslims and 600,000 Jews live. What have French Jews to do with Middle East violence, other than the fact that they are Jewish? If French Jews wanted to become Israeli citizens they could easily do so. But they have made a decision to be what they are, French and Jewish. It has become chillingly clear that the destruction of Israel is not the primary goal of the "Arab street."
NEWS
November 18, 1988
A West German judicial panel acquitted a former Nazi of complicity in the murder of 177 French Jews sent to the death camp at Auschwitz--a verdict that drew shouts of "Nazi murderer!" from victims' relatives and spectators in the Bonn courtroom. Count Modest Korff, 79, was accused of ordering the deportations of Jews from the Chalons-sur-Marne region of northeastern France, where he served as Gestapo chief in 1942 and 1943.
NEWS
April 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
President Jacques Chirac on Tuesday made the first visit by a French head of state to Paris' Grand Mosque in 76 years to denounce a spate of attacks on Jewish sites and call for unity between French Jews and Muslims. Synagogues, schools and cemeteries around the country have been targeted, often with firebombs, in the last two weeks. In the most serious case, a Marseille synagogue was burned to the ground March 31.
OPINION
August 29, 2004 | Jo-Ann Mort, Jo-Ann Mort is co-author of "Our Hearts Invented a Place: Can Kibbutzim Survive in Today's Israel?"
Amid the mix of languages -- Hebrew, English, Arabic -- commonly heard on the streets of Israel, a new one stood out this summer: French. French Jews, worried about a rise in anti-Semitism in France and encouraged by Israeli leaders, are coming -- even moving -- to Israel in droves. The signs of the French presence are everywhere. Tel Aviv restaurants now highlight Tunisian tuna (many French Jews have roots in Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Good things don't come exclusively in small packages, sometimes they come in great big ones that don't stay around for very long. Which is the case with the exceptional new three-hour documentary that is playing for three days only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The film, "Being Jewish in France," screening today, Saturday and Sunday at LACMA's Bing Auditorium, may sound like a picture with a limited potential audience, but that turns out to be not the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1997 | JANA J. MONJI
Julian Barry attempts to include all the highly marketable angles in his new drama "Reunification Hotel," at the new Venture West Theater. There is titillating sex, violence and violent sex, and for the intellectuals he includes a fair dose of history that borders on overdose.
WORLD
July 17, 2010 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
As Jeremie Fazel stood to pay his respects at his adored grandfather's grave, something felt profoundly wrong. "The name on the headstone was Benjamin Fazel. It was my grandfather's name but not the one he was born with. For me, it was very symbolic because I felt like it wasn't him," the 32-year-old Parisian said recently. "It was then I decided I had to change my name." You can call Fazel many things: He is French, the grandson and son of Jewish emigres from Poland, a documentary maker and a film editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Good things don't come exclusively in small packages, sometimes they come in great big ones that don't stay around for very long. Which is the case with the exceptional new three-hour documentary that is playing for three days only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The film, "Being Jewish in France," screening today, Saturday and Sunday at LACMA's Bing Auditorium, may sound like a picture with a limited potential audience, but that turns out to be not the case.
OPINION
December 25, 2006
Re "Hitler's Mideast helpers," Opinion, Dec. 20 Max Boot's column, in which he lumps together Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's denial of the Holocaust with Arab collaboration with the Nazis, is a thinly veiled argument in support of a common canard: Mideast peace cannot be achieved by negotiating with the Arabs because their opposition to Israel is based on a fundamental anti-Semitism. The chief problem with this is that it is a view without hope that will lead to the continued misery of everyone in the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2006 | Kelly-Anne Suarez, Times Staff Writer
Everyone had a reason -- a deeply personal reason -- to be there. Doris Montrose's father nearly died in Auschwitz. Laurence Hermon, a Parisian and a Jew, awaited the response from the French consul general. Diana Tehrani, 21, paled at the thought of the three weeks of torture -- three weeks, she repeated -- endured by man just two years her senior.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
The time is August 1946, a year after the liberation of France, and a small group of Parisian Jews are living lives that, as the title of this quietly impressive film tells us, are "Almost Peaceful." "Almost Peaceful" succeeds as a delicately moving memory piece about a subject not often put on film: the process of moving on into ordinary life after surviving the Holocaust.
OPINION
August 29, 2004 | Jo-Ann Mort, Jo-Ann Mort is co-author of "Our Hearts Invented a Place: Can Kibbutzim Survive in Today's Israel?"
Amid the mix of languages -- Hebrew, English, Arabic -- commonly heard on the streets of Israel, a new one stood out this summer: French. French Jews, worried about a rise in anti-Semitism in France and encouraged by Israeli leaders, are coming -- even moving -- to Israel in droves. The signs of the French presence are everywhere. Tel Aviv restaurants now highlight Tunisian tuna (many French Jews have roots in Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A third of French Jews are more religious today than 14 years ago. At the same time, nearly 40% of younger Jews marry outside the faith. The profile of Western Europe's largest but dwindling Jewish population is captured in a new study by the Paris-based Unified Jewish Social Fund. The survey of more than 1,000 Jews is considered the most comprehensive look in years at the Jewish community in France.
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