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NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
There's been another change at the top of the normally placid Thomas Keller Restaurant Group . David Breeden, formerly the executive sous chef at Per Se in New York, will be moving west to replace Timothy Hollingsworth at the top of the French Laundry in Yountville, Calif. Breeden will be the fourth chef de cuisine at the landmark restaurant in the last decade. He steps into the position once filled by Eric Ziebold (chef at CityZen in Washington, D.C .) and Corey Lee (chef at Benu in San Francisco )
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Spinning Plates" is a foodie phantasmagoria and something more. On one level a series of mini-docs on a trio of wildly different eating establishments, it becomes a group portrait of the restaurant business as well as an involving look at personal dramas that go well beyond the kitchen. This is the first documentary feature for writer-director Joseph Levy (who previously produced the Food Network series "Into the Fire"), and he has been shrewd in the three restaurants he profiles - places that have passionate, articulate key personnel who would all agree that, as one of them puts it, "This is not just our job; this is our life.
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NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Timothy Hollingsworth, the 33-year-old chef de cuisine at the French Laundry , is moving to Los Angeles. But don't get your hopes too high. He doesn't have a restaurant planned - not yet, anyway. Hollingsworth announced in November that he would be leaving the Laundry in spring. At the time he told the San Francisco Chronicle's Paolo Lucchesi that he was playing with an idea of opening a more casual and popular type of restaurant, maybe even a spin on Mexican. He's still thinking about doing something like that, but first he's going to be working in video production.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Timothy Hollingsworth, the 33-year-old chef de cuisine at the French Laundry , is moving to Los Angeles. But don't get your hopes too high. He doesn't have a restaurant planned - not yet, anyway. Hollingsworth announced in November that he would be leaving the Laundry in spring. At the time he told the San Francisco Chronicle's Paolo Lucchesi that he was playing with an idea of opening a more casual and popular type of restaurant, maybe even a spin on Mexican. He's still thinking about doing something like that, but first he's going to be working in video production.
FOOD
June 11, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
Yountville, Calif.-- DESPITE the distractions of opening a new restaurant in New York, and nine years at the stove of his Napa Valley restaurant, the French Laundry, Thomas Keller has never been better. His cooking is still full of surprises, and a recent meal at the French Laundry was truly dazzling.
FOOD
April 10, 2002 | MIRA ADVANI HONEYCUTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 20 years ago, Don and Sally Schmitt opened their dream restaurant in the then-sleepy Napa Valley town of Yountville. It was a small place they called the French Laundry. After running the homey restaurant for 16 years, they sold it in 1994 to Thomas Keller. Today it's among the most famous restaurants in the world--and the Schmitts are farming apples. This is hardly the comedown it might seem.
FOOD
October 23, 2002 | David Shaw, Times Staff Writer
THOMAS Keller's pursuit of perfection is legendary in the restaurant community. It is "the ultimate component of his personality," writes Michael Ruhlman in "The Soul of a Chef," and indeed, when the two men collaborated on "The French Laundry Cookbook," Keller told Ruhlman exactly how he wanted to be portrayed in the book -- not so much a master chef as "a Buddhist monk in search of perfection."
FOOD
January 20, 2010 | By S. IRENE VIRBILA, Restaurant Critic
From the avalanche of attention Thomas Keller has been getting for Bouchon , you'd almost think the arrival of the new Beverly Hills restaurant was the second coming. Actually, it is, in a way. For those without a long memory, Keller was executive chef at Checkers Hotel in downtown L.A. in the early '90s, well before the French Laundry, Per Se and his seven Michelin stars. Now Keller is back in Los Angeles in a big way, this time as a phenomenally successful chef trailing all the high expectations and jealousies that exalted status entails.
TRAVEL
March 9, 1997
Regarding the letter from A. Venkatesh about "Napa Nest" (Feb. 16): I think Chef Thomas Keller would be insulted to have anyone describe his Yountville restaurant, the French Laundry, as "swank." The dictionary uses these words to describe "swank": ostentatious, swaggering, showy, pretentious and expensive. None of these words apply to the French Laundry. How about superb, elegant, understated, wonderful and fantastic? MYRON D. OAKES San Marino
TRAVEL
February 16, 1997
I read with interest Michael Walker's article "Napa Nest" (Weekend Escape, Jan. 26). It is unfortunate that Walker was not lucky enough to dine at the French Laundry in Yountville but made a comment that it was "Napa Valley's swanky restaurant of the moment." My wife and I have dined many times at the French Laundry in the last two years. Thomas Keller is probably the most creative chef in the country today. If we have one last meal, I hope and pray it will be Keller's. A. VENKATESH Encino
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
New head chef at Patina: Joachim Splichal, founder of Patina Restaurant Group, names Charles Olalia executive chef of Patina, his landmark restaurant at the Walt Disney Concert Hall downtown. Olalia, 29, was formerly chef de cuisine and started at the restaurant in 2010 after working as a private chef with Oracle and in the kitchens at the French Laundry in Napa Valley and Guy Savoy in Las Vegas. 141 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, (213) 972-3331, www.patinarestaurant.com . New in Silver Lake: Hyperion Public has opened in Silver Lake, serving "contemporary American cuisine with light organic options, paired with craft and local tap beers, wine and cocktails.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Restaurant Critic
Discovered this weekend when once-a-year cooks were in the kitchen brandishing knives: adhesive bandages that are waterproof and don't fall off five minutes after you apply them. These actually stick, so no begging off doing the dishes. Another plus: they're not that icky beige-pink color all over. Say hello to Nexcare Waterproof Bandages from 3M. Available in most drugstores, a package of 20 assorted shapes runs about $3. Keep a couple packs in the kitchen on standby. ALSO: 3rd annual Napa Truffle Festival Cook's gift: Fog Linen kitchen towels There's a new chef at the French Laundry: David Breeden twitter.com/sirenevirbila
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
There's been another change at the top of the normally placid Thomas Keller Restaurant Group . David Breeden, formerly the executive sous chef at Per Se in New York, will be moving west to replace Timothy Hollingsworth at the top of the French Laundry in Yountville, Calif. Breeden will be the fourth chef de cuisine at the landmark restaurant in the last decade. He steps into the position once filled by Eric Ziebold (chef at CityZen in Washington, D.C .) and Corey Lee (chef at Benu in San Francisco )
FOOD
January 20, 2010 | By S. IRENE VIRBILA, Restaurant Critic
From the avalanche of attention Thomas Keller has been getting for Bouchon , you'd almost think the arrival of the new Beverly Hills restaurant was the second coming. Actually, it is, in a way. For those without a long memory, Keller was executive chef at Checkers Hotel in downtown L.A. in the early '90s, well before the French Laundry, Per Se and his seven Michelin stars. Now Keller is back in Los Angeles in a big way, this time as a phenomenally successful chef trailing all the high expectations and jealousies that exalted status entails.
WORLD
January 29, 2009 | Betty Hallock
The biannual Bocuse d'Or culinary competition in Lyon, France, ended on a familiar note Wednesday: A chef from Norway won again. It was a disappointment for U.S. contestant Timothy Hollingsworth, who placed sixth. Geir Skeie, a 28-year-old chef at Midtaasen restaurant in Sandefjord, Norway, received the golden Bocuse d'Or statue -- made in the likeness of the contest's founder, legendary chef Paul Bocuse -- and about $26,000.
FOOD
January 26, 2009 | Betty Hallock
On a drizzly day in the heart of Napa Valley, Timothy Hollingsworth stands slightly bowed over his cutting board, crumbling a scallop sausage between his fingers. After months of preparation for the most prestigious cooking competition in the world, and with only a few weeks to go, one of his dishes is falling apart. What should have been a silken-smooth, perfectly shaped mixture of shellfish and cream has cracked during cooking and is coarse and grainy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Spinning Plates" is a foodie phantasmagoria and something more. On one level a series of mini-docs on a trio of wildly different eating establishments, it becomes a group portrait of the restaurant business as well as an involving look at personal dramas that go well beyond the kitchen. This is the first documentary feature for writer-director Joseph Levy (who previously produced the Food Network series "Into the Fire"), and he has been shrewd in the three restaurants he profiles - places that have passionate, articulate key personnel who would all agree that, as one of them puts it, "This is not just our job; this is our life.
FOOD
April 5, 2006 | S. Irene Virbila
A friend once told a story about dining at Spago one night, seeing Wolfgang Puck there, and then flying up to San Francisco in time for breakfast at Postrio the next morning. When he arrived at the door of Puck's San Francisco restaurant, who should open the door but someone who looked very like Puck himself.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
WHEN I told a friend who works as a chef that I was taking three days of cooking classes in the Anderson Valley for a vacation, his response was quick and typically tart: "I wish you'd told me first. I need help in my kitchen." Wisecracks aside, I understand that some might find the idea of a "cooking vacation" counterintuitive. Who would want to worry over a stove with a group of strangers in the heat of summer?
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