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February 11, 1997
Drue Leyton, 93, actress and heroine in the French underground during World War II. Born Dorothy Elizabeth Blackman in Somers, Wis., she became an actress after her marriage to a Los Angeles architect failed. She appeared in "Green Grow the Lilacs" on Broadway and in several Charlie Chan movies during the 1930s. Acting in Europe, Leyton broadcast from Paris for the Voice of America, earning condemnation from the Nazis.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Martha Groves
For Chasten Bowen, news that France is negotiating with the U.S. to pay reparations to Holocaust survivors who were transported on French rail cars to Nazi concentration camps during World War II comes too late. “I'm just about ready to leave this world,” said the 89-year-old Anaheim resident. “If there's money available, there are others who need it worse than I do.” Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said Friday that the French government entered into formal talks with the U.S. State Department on Feb. 6 regarding reparations and hopes to wrap up an agreement by the end of the year.
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NEWS
July 22, 1989
Marie-Madeleine Fourcade, 79, a leading figure in the French Resistance during World War II. She headed the Alliance network of the Resistance using the code name Herisson, or Hedgehog. She was the only woman to head one of the large networks of Resistance fighters against the Nazis in France. Born into a bourgeois family in Marseilles, she studied music at the Ecole Normale de Musique and as a young girl lived for a time in Shanghai. In 1940, after the fall of France, she was in Oloron-Ste.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
Maurice Herzog, a French mountaineer who became a hero to his country in 1950 when he and a fellow climber became the first men to successfully scale a peak of more than 26,000 feet, has died. He was 93. Herzog, who wrote a best-selling account of his harrowing ascent of the Himalayan mountain known as Annapurna, died Friday in France of natural causes, said Pierre You, president of the French Federation of Mountaineering and Climbing. Herzog had lived near Paris. In a tribute, French President Francois Hollande said Herzog's historic climb was "engraved enduringly in our collective memory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000
Andre Jarrot, 90, a hero of the French Resistance during World War II. He was a motorcycle-racing champion before the war and a garage mechanic and local politician after it, and France's first minister for the quality of life. Born in Lux, Jarrot left school to work in his early teens. He devoted his free time to motorcycle riding, becoming French national champion in the 500-cubic-centimeter category in 1937 and co-holder of the world 24-hour endurance title in 1938.
NEWS
July 30, 1992
Auguste Lecoeur, 80, a leading member of the French Resistance during World War II and a top official of France's Communist Party for nearly 30 years. Lecoeur was a militant Communist and active member of the miners union by the age of 16. Recognizing his organizational talents, the Communist Party sent him to join the International Brigade during the Spanish Civil War and he served as a battalion commander.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lucie Aubrac, a hero of the French Resistance who helped free her husband from the Gestapo and whose dramatic life story became a successful French film, has died. She was 94. Aubrac, whose maiden name was Lucie Bernard, died Wednesday in a hospital in the Paris suburb of Issy-les-Moulineaux, where she spent the last two months, said her daughter, Catherine Vallade. French President Jacques Chirac called Aubrac an "emblematic figure," saying "a light of the Resistance has gone out."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The fourth screen adaptation of Louis Pergaud's 1912 novel (and one of two dueling versions to hit French theaters within a week of each other), this "War of the Buttons" melds the book's anti-militarist story of feuding rural schoolboys to a boilerplate take on the French Resistance. As with his films "The Chorus" and "Paris 36," director Christophe Barratier anchors the action to a reassuring middle ground, bathing it in the golden light of nostalgia. The setting is the Haute-Loire, where an incident of trespassing sparks an epic battle between boys from neighboring villages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2010 | From Los Angeles Times wire services
Gen. Marcel Bigeard, a decorated veteran who led France's elite parachute forces in colonial wars in independence-seeking Indochina and Algeria after serving in the French Resistance in World War II, died Friday in his hometown of Toul in eastern France. He was 94. Born Feb. 14, 1916, Bigeard was taken into German captivity during World War II as a warrant officer in the 23rd Fortress Infantry Regiment in June 1940. He escaped Nov. 11, 1942, made his way to Senegal, in what was then French West Africa, and was commissioned into Gen. Charles de Gaulle's Free French Forces.
TRAVEL
March 31, 1985 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
One cannot, goes the caveat of regional biographer laureate Freda White, judge countries by their capitals. So may terminal jet lag (to say nothing of woe) betide the traveler who sees New York as all the United States has to offer and considers London the sole merriment of merrie olde England or remembers Paris as toute la boutique. By all means visit these masterpiece metropolises. Especially Paris. But then bow out and away, instructs White, "as a courtier bows himself out of the presence of an old, indifferent queen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The fourth screen adaptation of Louis Pergaud's 1912 novel (and one of two dueling versions to hit French theaters within a week of each other), this "War of the Buttons" melds the book's anti-militarist story of feuding rural schoolboys to a boilerplate take on the French Resistance. As with his films "The Chorus" and "Paris 36," director Christophe Barratier anchors the action to a reassuring middle ground, bathing it in the golden light of nostalgia. The setting is the Haute-Loire, where an incident of trespassing sparks an epic battle between boys from neighboring villages.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Nicole Rudick, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Breaking of Eggs A Novel Jim Powell Penguin: 342 pp., $15 paper In his debut novel, "The Breaking of Eggs," British writer Jim Powell surveys an impressive breadth of time ? and trains his focus on a small slice. The book's historical scope encompasses Poland at the turn of the 20th century and Columbus, Ohio, in the early 1990s. The story is framed, however, by a fraction of that distance, beginning New Year's Day 1991 , in a Paris apartment and concluding on Dec. 31 of that same year, in the same apartment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2010 | From Los Angeles Times wire services
Gen. Marcel Bigeard, a decorated veteran who led France's elite parachute forces in colonial wars in independence-seeking Indochina and Algeria after serving in the French Resistance in World War II, died Friday in his hometown of Toul in eastern France. He was 94. Born Feb. 14, 1916, Bigeard was taken into German captivity during World War II as a warrant officer in the 23rd Fortress Infantry Regiment in June 1940. He escaped Nov. 11, 1942, made his way to Senegal, in what was then French West Africa, and was commissioned into Gen. Charles de Gaulle's Free French Forces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Walker "Bud" Mahurin, the Army Air Forces' first double ace in Europe during World War II who went on to serve in the Pacific and later became a POW after being shot down during the Korean War, has died. He was 91. Mahurin, a retired Air Force colonel who had suffered a stroke in October, died Tuesday at his home in Newport Beach, said his stepdaughter, Valerie Miller. "The name is familiar to almost everybody in the Air Force," said Doug Lantry, a historian at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009 | Wendy Smith
Albert Camus grappled with virtually every crisis of the 20th century intellectual. He was an anti-colonial activist in his native Algeria during the 1930s and a member of the Resistance in occupied France.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2008 | Martin Weil, Washington Post
Henri Cartan, one of the world's foremost mathematicians in the last half of the 20th century, died Aug. 13 in Paris. He was 104. The cause of death was not reported. Almost all of Cartan's career was spent in France, and he was acclaimed for his research in pure mathematics, including algebra, topology and the analytic functions of complex variables. He was also an influential writer and teacher. At least two of his students won Nobel Prizes, one in economics and one in physics.
NEWS
June 11, 1987
A former member of the French Resistance movement testified in Klaus Barbie's trial in Lyon that Nazi occupiers of France were well aware of the fate reserved for people they deported to death camps. Part of Barbie's defense against alleged crimes against humanity has been that as Lyon Gestapo chief, he merely carried out orders and did not know that the Jews and Resistance fighters deported were often sent to their deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001
Dr. Rofolphe Coigney, 89, a hero of the French Resistance during World War II who became an official of the World Health Organization, died June 6 in New York City. Born in Paris, Coigney studied medicine and served in the French medical corps. For his bravery during a German attack on a French troop train, he was awarded the Croix de Guerre in 1940. He stayed in Paris during the German occupation as a practicing physician.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germaine Tillion, 100, a celebrated anthropologist and French Resistance fighter during World War II, who wrote about her experiences in a Nazi camp, died April 19 at her home near Paris. Tillion -- who was sent in 1943 to the Nazi camp for women and children in Ravensbruck, Germany, for her work with France's underground network -- was the recipient of the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honor, one of France's highest distinctions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lucie Aubrac, a hero of the French Resistance who helped free her husband from the Gestapo and whose dramatic life story became a successful French film, has died. She was 94. Aubrac, whose maiden name was Lucie Bernard, died Wednesday in a hospital in the Paris suburb of Issy-les-Moulineaux, where she spent the last two months, said her daughter, Catherine Vallade. French President Jacques Chirac called Aubrac an "emblematic figure," saying "a light of the Resistance has gone out."
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