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Frequent Fliers

BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | From Reuters
Business travelers who thought they understood the pros and cons of each mileage program need to recalculate over the next year as most of the major airlines make their plans more restrictive. The key change is raising from 20,000 to 25,000 the number of miles needed for a ticket within the continental United States and Canada. Some have also increased their requirements for travel to Mexico or the Caribbean and to Europe. But there are some bright spots.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 1988 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
When Eric Fuller was a student at UC Berkeley in 1982, he helped make ends meet by buying and selling airline frequent-flier mileage awards. The business became so good, in fact, that after he finished law school in San Diego and passed the California bar exam, he went into it full time. At the peak of his success in 1986, his La Jolla-based Coupon Bank employed 100 people and grossed $2 million a month. But all that has changed.
TRAVEL
September 7, 2003 | James Gilden, Special to The Times
Perhaps you just need to check your frequent-flier mileage balance online to see whether you have enough for that trip to Florida. Or maybe you're looking for a "mileage run," an inexpensive flight to log miles before the end of the year so you'll qualify for the next level of premium status. Whatever your status or needs, you'll find plenty of Internet resources to help you.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | SUZANNE SCHLOSBERG
Michael Bullard belongs to three frequent flier clubs and has accumulated enough miles in the air, he says, for "oh, about 43 free trips to China." So excuse him if he's a little tired of flight attendants who think they're teaching second grade. "They squeak their voices, and they say, 'Now, this is how you fasten your seat belt,' " says Michael, a guy with an earnest, freckled face and glasses perched on the tip of his nose. "Then they make you read the safety instruction card.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: Is it true that more businesses are founded during recessions? Answer: Actually, firm formation rates don't fluctuate much in booms or busts, said Dane Stangler, research manager at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. "Our research shows that there is very little variance in formation or survival rates of businesses," Stangler said.
TRAVEL
March 25, 1990 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer .
The madness started two years ago when Delta Airlines thought it had discovered a marketing bonanza. The airline sent letters to its frequent-flier program members announcing a special mileage bonus deal: For each member flying Delta and using an American Express credit card, Delta would award triple mileage. It seemed like a profitable arrangement for both Delta and American Express. The airline would get passengers and American Express would get ticket sales.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1994 | CAROL SMITH, CAROL SMITH is a free-lance writer based in Pasadena
Frequent-flier mileage award programs may be among the most successful brand-loyalty campaigns ever launched, but they are also a source of frustration for many travelers who can't always use their points to get where they want to go. Indeed, Ed Skebe of Manhattan Beach got so fed up with his inability to get a free seat to Bangkok using his reward points on Northwest Airlines that he recently took the carrier to small claims court.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | SUZANNE SCHLOSBERG, Schlosberg is a regular contributor to Valley View.
Michael Bullard belongs to three frequent flier clubs and has accumulated enough miles in the air, he says, for "oh, about 43 free trips to China." So excuse him if he's a little tired of flight attendants who think they're teaching second grade. "They squeak their voices, and they say, 'Now, this is how you fasten your seat belt,' " says Michael, a guy with an earnest, freckled face and glasses perched on the tip of his nose. "Then they make you read the safety instruction card.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: My husband and I travel to Vietnam two or three times a year to visit our family. We fly EVA Airways and book in premium economy for the extra legroom. We can book our seats 100 days in advance. But the only two-across seats that are available in Rows 21-27 are in that last row, which is near the toilet, and they don't recline; everything else is blocked. I've asked my travel agent for help - I even stood there while she called. No luck. Why does this happen? What should I do?
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