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Friday The 13th Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Paramount Pictures once treated its "Friday the 13th" movies the way some folks might treat an eccentric aunt: carefully. And not without some embarrassment. Except for TV ad campaigns targeted at the movies' youthful core audience, promotion was minimal. Publicity materials heralding the studio's upcoming product often failed to mention the latest installment of the saga.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Paramount Pictures once treated its "Friday the 13th" movies the way some folks might treat an eccentric aunt: carefully. And not without some embarrassment. Except for TV ad campaigns targeted at the movies' youthful core audience, promotion was minimal. Publicity materials heralding the studio's upcoming product often failed to mention the latest installment of the saga.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Paramount Pictures once treated its "Friday the 13th" movies the way some folks might treat an eccentric aunt: carefully. And not without some embarrassment. Except for TV ad campaigns targeted at the movies' youthful core audience, promotion was minimal. Studio publicity materials heralding its upcoming product often failed to mention the latest installment of the saga.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Times Staff Writer
Stepping in as writer-director of the latest installment in the bloody "Friday the 13th" series would not seem to leave a lot of room for creativity. After all, the formula seemed fairly set after the first seven chapters in the lucrative string of horror flicks: teen-aged campers at fictional Camp Crystal Lake get picked off, one by one, in grisly fashion by an ax-wielding, hockey mask-wearing monster named Jason. The series had grossed more than $200 million, so why tinker with success?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Times Staff Writer
Stepping in as writer-director of the latest installment in the bloody "Friday the 13th" series would not seem to leave a lot of room for creativity. After all, the formula seemed fairly set after the first seven chapters in the lucrative string of horror flicks: teen-aged campers at fictional Camp Crystal Lake get picked off, one by one, in grisly fashion by an ax-wielding, hockey mask-wearing monster named Jason. The series had grossed more than $200 million, so why tinker with success?
SPORTS
March 3, 2002
"I think it's a 'Friday the 13th' type movie. It's just one of those cheesy little 'B' movies." John Rocker, commenting on his role as a homicidal maniac in the movie "The Greenskeeper."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1989
The Metro Section of The Times told of a "man killed by gangs as he admires view at Palisades" (Metro, July 31). Later in the article mention was made of a woman shot and killed as she visited with friends. On the front page of the Calendar the same day, the article on the latest "Friday the 13th" movie included this line in explaining the film's main character, Jason--"The fact that anyone's fair game, may be one of the reasons for the character's appeal." Kind of scary, isn't it?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Can't Keep a Good Mask Down: The hockey mask used in the original "Friday the 13th" movie disappeared last week but surfaced two days later--similar to the way its wearer, the movie's homicidal killer Jason, keeps reappearing in sequels. Film director John Waters said he obtained the white plastic mask as a gift for a friend, but that it was stolen off the porch of his Baltimore house when it was delivered last week. Waters reported the theft to police and placed the value at "priceless."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 9 - 15 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES Singing and talent competitions:   Blind auditions continue on "The Voice" (8 p.m. NBC); "The X Factor" returns for a new season (8 p.m. Fox). Six acts perform one last time on "America's Got Talent" (9 p.m. NBC). Oh Sit!  Stu Stone performs in this new episode (8 p.m. KTLA). Abandoned:  The search for hidden riches visits an abandoned bank that was built to hold the fortunes of America's oil barons in a new episode (9 p.m. National Geographic)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Paramount Pictures once treated its "Friday the 13th" movies the way some folks might treat an eccentric aunt: carefully. And not without some embarrassment. Except for TV ad campaigns targeted at the movies' youthful core audience, promotion was minimal. Studio publicity materials heralding its upcoming product often failed to mention the latest installment of the saga.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1988 | From the Associated Press
It's not exactly a role actors would kill for, but kill they do. Seven men have portrayed Jason Voorhees, the masked and mutilated corpse who refuses to stay dead in the seven "Friday the 13th" movies. 1. Ari Lehman was 14 when he launched Jason's blood binge in "Friday the 13th."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Joseph Ruben's 1987 "The Stepfather"--written by the novelist Donald Westlake and featuring a remarkable, little-known actor, Terry O'Quinn, as a chameleonic psychotic searching for the perfect family and killing the failures one after another--was a shocker aimed at a genre audience that caught the critics instead. "The Stepfather 2" (citywide), on the other hand, is the sort of sequel that shouldn't have been made.
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