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Friends Of The Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center

MAGAZINE
August 10, 1986
Around the turn of the century, English-born watercolorist Norman St. Clair painted landscapes at Laguna Beach. He exhibited them in San Francisco in 1906, and within the next two decades, between 30 and 40 artists followed him to the coastal village. Local lore has it that at first they hung their art on fences to attract buyers. But in July, 1918, a show was held in the Old Town Hall, drawing nearly 2,000 viewers during the first three weeks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Laguna Beach facility that rescues imperiled sea mammals has seen a sharp increase in its caseload this spring. And they're happy about it. Officials with the Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center say that more sea lions being rescued means that more sea lions are being born, signaling a return to normalcy after a sharp drop in reproduction after the El Nino weather pattern of 1997-98.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young beaked whale who stranded herself on the shore near Malibu died late Saturday, despite efforts of marine volunteers who watched over her 24 hours a day, fed and hydrated her through a tube and tried to nurse her back to health. The whale--named BJ for Bob Janice, the lifeguard who first noticed her--probably died from a kidney infection, said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A marine center that rescues imperiled animals has seen a sharp increase in its caseload this spring. And they're happy about it. Officials with the Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center say that more sea lions being rescued means that more sea lions are being born, signaling a return to normalcy after a sharp drop in reproduction after the El Nino season of 1997-98.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1986 | GORDON GRANT, Times Staff Writer
Residents of Avalon on Santa Catalina Island thought that the young elephant seal that washed onto the beach might have been shot, but no one knew what to do. That was on Sunday. Late that evening, a woman who lives near the harbor couldn't stand the animal's suffering any longer. Carmen Langford had heard of a volunteer group called Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach, which cares for sick or wounded sea mammals, mostly from Orange County beaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young beaked whale who stranded herself on the shore near Malibu died late Saturday, despite efforts of marine volunteers who watched over her 24 hours a day, fed and hydrated her through a tube and tried to nurse her back to health. The whale--named BJ for Bob Janice, the lifeguard who first noticed her--probably died from a kidney infection, said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Three dead sea lions washed ashore in the Huntington Beach area Wednesday, bringing to seven the number of marine mammals that have turned up dead on area beaches in the past week. Federal officials said they are investigating the unexplained deaths. "This many deaths in a short period of time is unusual," said Joe Cordaro, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Marine Fisheries Service office in Los Angeles, which is conducting an investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Four more dead sea lions were reported washed ashore on Orange County beaches Saturday, widening the mystery of the animals' unexplained deaths. In addition, Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach received reports of two more dead sea lions, one south of Laguna Beach and the other at Dana Point, but authorities were not able to verify those reports. Nevertheless, the sea lion death toll continues to mount at a pace that has perplexed scientists and marine animal experts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children clambered over slimy rocks Saturday, picking their way through swirling tide pools rich with antediluvian sea life. It was low tide at the Dana Point tide pools. The seawater had rolled back and left the stubbly shore naked. Seaweed-covered rocks provided the only fortification for hundreds of crustaceans, mollusks and other creatures in the pristine puddles and gullies of trapped water. The children squealed with delight at the sea's exposed wonders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1988 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Maybe it was the thought of all those herring and squid just dropping into their mouths or maybe a touch of sadness about leaving ol' Stubbs and Carly behind. But whatever it was that led Kiki and Emilia to pause just a moment Saturday before bidding goodby to the Friends of the Sea Lion, it didn't stop them for long.
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