Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFrog
IN THE NEWS

Frog

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
June 16, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Everyone covets defined abs, and the frog pelvic tilt will help you get there. The exercise comes from Pasadena-based fitness expert, video host and teacher Tracey Mallett (www.traceymallett.com). Mallett is the founder of Booty Barre, a technique that combines elements of dance, yoga and Pilates to strengthen and stretch the body. No prior experience in any of those disciplines is necessary, but maintaining good form is. Make sure that the spine, neck and head are aligned and that the movements are slow and deliberate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Elizabeth Hand
"People are trapped in history and history is trapped in them," wrote James Baldwin in "Notes of a Native Son. " Much of novelist Emma Donoghue's literary career has involved the liberation of historical figures, often women, from the constraints of the recorded past to the relative freedom of fiction, as in her novels "Slammerkin," "The Sealed Letter" and "Life Mask," all set in the 18th or 19th century. Her most recent work, the multiple-award-winning international bestseller "Room," took a more contemporary approach, loosely inspired by the experiences of women recently held captive by abusive men. In her new novel, "Frog Music," Donoghue returns to the more distant past to take on an unsolved San Francisco murder: that of young Jenny Bonnet, shot by an unknown killer lurking outside her railway hotel room.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009
'The Princess and the Frog' MPAA rating: G for general audiences Running time: 1 hour, 37 minutes Playing: Walt Disney Studios Theater: For info and tickets go to Disney.go.com/disneypictures/princessfrogtickets/. In general release Dec. 11.
OPINION
March 15, 2014
Re "Frog eggs head up the hill," March 13 Efforts to reintroduce red-legged frogs to the Santa Monica Mountains are crucial to assuring the future of these California natives once common in the state. The population of red-legged frogs has declined by more than 90%. Since red-legged frogs gained federal Endangered Species Act protection, we've learned much about threats to our struggling amphibian populations, none more prevalent than the 200 million pounds of pesticides applied to California crops annually, some of which drifts into the frogs' mountain habitats.
HEALTH
June 16, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein
Everyone covets defined abs, and the frog pelvic tilt will help you get there. The exercise comes from Pasadena-based fitness expert, video host and teacher Tracey Mallett (www.traceymallett.com). Mallett is the founder of Booty Barre, a technique that combines elements of dance, yoga and Pilates to strengthen and stretch the body. No prior experience in any of those disciplines is necessary, but maintaining good form is. Make sure that the spine, neck and head are aligned and that the movements are slow and deliberate.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have long thought that bullfrogs generally can't jump more than a meter. Turns out they were wrong -- which they learned only after leaving the lab and heading to California to witness a county fair contest inspired by one of Mark Twain's most famous short stories. These biomechanists didn't go to the Calaveras County Fair & Jumping Frog Jubilee just to have a good time. The research, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, shows that sometimes lab studies don't reveal the full potential of animals' abilities, and the mechanisms underlying them.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A frog has been found in a remote part of Indonesia that has no lungs and breathes through its skin, a discovery that researchers this week said could provide insight into what drives evolution in certain species. The aquatic frog Barbourula kalimantanensis was found on Borneo island in 2007, researchers said Thursday in the journal Current Biology. The species is the first frog known to science without lungs and joins a short list of amphibians with this unusual trait, including a few species of salamanders and a wormlike creature known as a caecilian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1986
Do you know how to boil a frog alive? If you throw him into hot water he just jumps out. So what you do is put him in cool water and then slowly turn up the heat. The dumb frog never notices the increase, and before he knows it, he's the main course for dinner. The politicians are trying to boil taxpayers using the same strategy. Proposition A to raise the county sales tax 0.5% is generating little organized opposition. After all, who can get excited about a small tax increase?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Cristy Lytal
Princess Tiana from Disney's "The Princess and the Frog" might have gotten her regal voice from Anika Noni Rose, but she got her royal moves from Danielle Moné Truitt, who worked as the "video reference" for the animated character. "I did all the body movements and facial references for the cartoon," Truitt said. "I got dressed in costume, and they videotaped me doing the scenes that were going to be in the film. The animators are amazing, but the video reference helps them bring the characters to life and give the cartoons more of a realistic appearance."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2005
Re: "Frog Mascot Has Had His Last Dance With WB," July 23: "The frog is dead," said WB Chairman Garth Ancier at the TV Critics Assn. press tour. The WB network is trying "to shed its teeny-bopper image." Clearly Mr. Ancier isn't familiar with frog history; "teeny-bopper" M.J. Frog is not, although he has been called an existential hero. Years ago Time magazine film critic Jay Cox called Chuck Jones' work "One Froggy Evening" a "morality play in cameo that comes as close as any cartoon ever has to perfection."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal biologists clad in waders and armed with long-handled nets this week moved hundreds of red-legged frog eggs from a San Fernando Valley stream to carefully selected wetlands 10 miles away in the first attempt to expand the threatened species' range in Southern California. Five hundred eggs transported from the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve to the Santa Monica Mountains are expected to hatch any day. When they do, they will reintroduce red-legged frog tadpoles to historic haunts that are free of predatory fish, snails and crayfish that could tear them apart.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
You'll know it's springtime in the Santa Monica Mountains when wildlife biologists start alerting curious visitors to keep their distance from the first red-legged frog reintroduction effort ever attempted in Southern California. Biologists are gearing up to transfer fragile batches of California red-legged frog eggs from a tiny, isolated population in the nearby Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve to separate streams in the Santa Monicas where the species has not been seen in nearly half a century.
SCIENCE
October 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
High in the mountains of northeastern Australia, scientists have discovered three intriguing animals that are brand new to science, and you can see all three of them in the photo gallery above. They include the bizarre-looking leaf-tailed gecko ( Saltuarius eximius ) with its giant eyes and broad leaf-shaped tail; the golden shade skink ( Saproscincus saltus ), which resembles a short snake with legs; and an elegant little frog ( Cophixalus petrophilus ) that spends most of its life in the cool moist cracks between the black granite boulders strewn across the top of the mountain range.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have long thought that bullfrogs generally can't jump more than a meter. Turns out they were wrong -- which they learned only after leaving the lab and heading to California to witness a county fair contest inspired by one of Mark Twain's most famous short stories. These biomechanists didn't go to the Calaveras County Fair & Jumping Frog Jubilee just to have a good time. The research, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, shows that sometimes lab studies don't reveal the full potential of animals' abilities, and the mechanisms underlying them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
David Gilhooly, a prominent Northern California sculptor of fanciful frogs who was a founder of the Bay Area funk art movement at UC Davis in the early 1960s, has died. He was 70. He died Aug. 21 after collapsing at his home in Newport, Ore., said his wife, Camille Chang. He had recently been diagnosed with cancer. Whimsical and irreverent, Gilhooly was internationally acclaimed for his imaginative ceramic works of animals, food and other subjects. He started his career in 1962 as an assistant to sculptor Robert Arneson, who ran the freewheeling TB-9 ceramics studio at UC Davis.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Frog lovers, close your eyes. A photo taken at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility caught the outline of a frog, midair, as the LADEE spacecraft launched on Friday. Wrong place, wrong time, froggy. Not since 1959 has such a tragedy occurred, when two frogs died -- along with 12 mice -- as the Jupiter AM-23 rocket was destroyed during launch.  But other frogs -- or would-be frogs -- have given their lives for space exploration. Frogs and frog eggs have been hurtled into space in the name of science over the years, according to NASA.  PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish Two bullfrogs donned their tiny little helmets for the Orbiting Frog Otolith mission of 1970.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1987
Your article on Debra Treister's refusal to dissect a frog in her biology class (April 29) brought back memories of what took place in my 1932 biology class in Cleveland, Ohio. Our assignment one day was to dissect a frog, and they were handed out to all the class members. My friend and classmate completed the assignment and noticed I had done nothing. When I told her I could not dissect the frog, she took mine and dissected it for me. A few minutes later my teacher, who saw what happened, called me up and placed another frog on his table, handed me the instrument and told me to dissect the frog.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Tiny frogs that have no middle ear use their mouths to hear, French scientists say. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  shows that the almighty eardrum may not be vertebrates' only solution for picking up sound. Gardiner's Seychelles frogs, known formally as Sechellophryne gardineri , are some of the tiniest amphibians to crawl the Earth, growing to a maximum 11 millimeters long. They and a few other species have evolved in isolation over the last 47 million to 65 million years, and aside from their extreme smallness, the frogs are known for being 'earless' -- they lack a middle ear or an eardrum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A federal proposal to make the Sierra Nevada as comfortable as possible for some of their rarest amphibian inhabitants has stirred a backlash from business owners over the economic pain it could cause the region's recreation industry. Many opponents worry the proposal would do more to protect frogs and toads than nonnative trout - a top tourist draw in mountain resort communities where cash registers ring up purchases by vacationers, hikers and fishing enthusiasts this time of year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|