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October 21, 1990
My fellow local herpetologists and I have noted the decline of frogs, but we did not know that it was part of a larger syndrome. In Southern California, it is easy to blame everything on development and habitat destruction. This, apparently, is not the case worldwide. I do know that places I went for frogs when I was a student in the early '60s no longer support any semblance of the frog populations extant at that time. If Jennings and Mark Hayes and other herpetologists concerned with the decline in amphibians are correct in their theories about why these animals are disappearing, I think we have a lot to think about--but we better do it quickly before this decline spreads irretrievably to the rest of the biome, including us. JERROLD J. FELDNER Van Nuys
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Elizabeth Hand
"People are trapped in history and history is trapped in them," wrote James Baldwin in "Notes of a Native Son. " Much of novelist Emma Donoghue's literary career has involved the liberation of historical figures, often women, from the constraints of the recorded past to the relative freedom of fiction, as in her novels "Slammerkin," "The Sealed Letter" and "Life Mask," all set in the 18th or 19th century. Her most recent work, the multiple-award-winning international bestseller "Room," took a more contemporary approach, loosely inspired by the experiences of women recently held captive by abusive men. In her new novel, "Frog Music," Donoghue returns to the more distant past to take on an unsolved San Francisco murder: that of young Jenny Bonnet, shot by an unknown killer lurking outside her railway hotel room.
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SCIENCE
May 19, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
African clawed frogs were first brought to California decades ago to help doctors figure out whether their patients were pregnant. After new technology made those pregnancy tests obsolete, the creatures were let loose, and thrived for decades in the state's drainage ditches and ponds. Now there are signs that the proliferation of African clawed frogs may be putting native species in peril. A study published last week in the journal PLOS ONE reveals that they carry a deadly fungus responsible for wiping out vast numbers of amphibians around the world.
OPINION
March 15, 2014
Re "Frog eggs head up the hill," March 13 Efforts to reintroduce red-legged frogs to the Santa Monica Mountains are crucial to assuring the future of these California natives once common in the state. The population of red-legged frogs has declined by more than 90%. Since red-legged frogs gained federal Endangered Species Act protection, we've learned much about threats to our struggling amphibian populations, none more prevalent than the 200 million pounds of pesticides applied to California crops annually, some of which drifts into the frogs' mountain habitats.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A four-year survey of a strange salmonella outbreak in children found that the culprits appear to be pet African dwarf frogs, according to researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study released Monday in the journal Pediatrics is the first to link a nationwide outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium to an amphibian species. Salmonella is typically a food-borne disease: Nontyphoidal salmonella sickens an estimated 1.2 million people per year, hospitalizing 23,000 and resulting in 450 deaths.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Tiny frogs that have no middle ear use their mouths to hear, French scientists say. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  shows that the almighty eardrum may not be vertebrates' only solution for picking up sound. Gardiner's Seychelles frogs, known formally as Sechellophryne gardineri , are some of the tiniest amphibians to crawl the Earth, growing to a maximum 11 millimeters long. They and a few other species have evolved in isolation over the last 47 million to 65 million years, and aside from their extreme smallness, the frogs are known for being 'earless' -- they lack a middle ear or an eardrum.
NEWS
August 23, 2005
Regarding "Frogs Trump Fish" [Aug. 16], on the removal of trout to protect mountain yellow-legged frogs, while I support the preservation of our natural resources, I am also an advocate of common sense. Have we overlooked that the frogs are part of Mother Nature's food chain? What would be the impact on the world if this frog ceased to exist? Monumental? I don't think so. GARY LEARN La Mesa
TRAVEL
June 23, 1985
Being a frog freak, I want to thank Alan Linn for his thoroughly delightful article (June 2) on the coqui frogs of Puerto Rico. I felt as though I was right there with him as he was searching for the elusive crooners. It was very enjoyable reading. ANNE WILSON Lakewood
NEWS
May 11, 2004 | Ashley Powers
The rare mountain yellow-legged frog recovers nicely in lakes once trout are expelled, according to a new study. The frogs swarmed the Sierra a century ago, but their numbers have plummeted since the 1980s and they are endangered in Southern California. UC Berkeley biologist Vance T. Vredenburg monitored 21 mountain lakes for eight years.
REAL ESTATE
July 24, 2005 | From Chicago Tribune
Real estate agents in Hawaii are including the presence of certain frogs in their property disclosures, the way that they already disclose termites and other potential hazards. The coqui frog, a native of Puerto Rico, has multiplied in such proportions throughout Hawaii that its distinctive, high-pitched chirp has turned into a nuisance. Agents report that buyers disturbed by the noise level are backing out of deals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal biologists clad in waders and armed with long-handled nets this week moved hundreds of red-legged frog eggs from a San Fernando Valley stream to carefully selected wetlands 10 miles away in the first attempt to expand the threatened species' range in Southern California. Five hundred eggs transported from the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve to the Santa Monica Mountains are expected to hatch any day. When they do, they will reintroduce red-legged frog tadpoles to historic haunts that are free of predatory fish, snails and crayfish that could tear them apart.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
You'll know it's springtime in the Santa Monica Mountains when wildlife biologists start alerting curious visitors to keep their distance from the first red-legged frog reintroduction effort ever attempted in Southern California. Biologists are gearing up to transfer fragile batches of California red-legged frog eggs from a tiny, isolated population in the nearby Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve to separate streams in the Santa Monicas where the species has not been seen in nearly half a century.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have long thought that bullfrogs generally can't jump more than a meter. Turns out they were wrong -- which they learned only after leaving the lab and heading to California to witness a county fair contest inspired by one of Mark Twain's most famous short stories. These biomechanists didn't go to the Calaveras County Fair & Jumping Frog Jubilee just to have a good time. The research, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, shows that sometimes lab studies don't reveal the full potential of animals' abilities, and the mechanisms underlying them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
David Gilhooly, a prominent Northern California sculptor of fanciful frogs who was a founder of the Bay Area funk art movement at UC Davis in the early 1960s, has died. He was 70. He died Aug. 21 after collapsing at his home in Newport, Ore., said his wife, Camille Chang. He had recently been diagnosed with cancer. Whimsical and irreverent, Gilhooly was internationally acclaimed for his imaginative ceramic works of animals, food and other subjects. He started his career in 1962 as an assistant to sculptor Robert Arneson, who ran the freewheeling TB-9 ceramics studio at UC Davis.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Frog lovers, close your eyes. A photo taken at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility caught the outline of a frog, midair, as the LADEE spacecraft launched on Friday. Wrong place, wrong time, froggy. Not since 1959 has such a tragedy occurred, when two frogs died -- along with 12 mice -- as the Jupiter AM-23 rocket was destroyed during launch.  But other frogs -- or would-be frogs -- have given their lives for space exploration. Frogs and frog eggs have been hurtled into space in the name of science over the years, according to NASA.  PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish Two bullfrogs donned their tiny little helmets for the Orbiting Frog Otolith mission of 1970.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Tiny frogs that have no middle ear use their mouths to hear, French scientists say. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  shows that the almighty eardrum may not be vertebrates' only solution for picking up sound. Gardiner's Seychelles frogs, known formally as Sechellophryne gardineri , are some of the tiniest amphibians to crawl the Earth, growing to a maximum 11 millimeters long. They and a few other species have evolved in isolation over the last 47 million to 65 million years, and aside from their extreme smallness, the frogs are known for being 'earless' -- they lack a middle ear or an eardrum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
To reach one of the last wild populations of the mountain yellow-legged frog on Earth, Adam Backlin and Elizabeth Gallegos tramped down a no-nonsense trail, scaled cliffs and barged through nettles along a vein of water in a scowling canyon deep in the San Gabriel Mountains. Finally, the U.S. Geological Survey field biologists reached the headwaters of the Mojave River, about 15 miles west of Wrightwood. They forded pools and crawled through underbrush to net as many of the endangered frogs as possible and methodically record their vital statistics.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A frog has been found in a remote part of Indonesia that has no lungs and breathes through its skin, a discovery that researchers this week said could provide insight into what drives evolution in certain species. The aquatic frog Barbourula kalimantanensis was found on Borneo island in 2007, researchers said Thursday in the journal Current Biology. The species is the first frog known to science without lungs and joins a short list of amphibians with this unusual trait, including a few species of salamanders and a wormlike creature known as a caecilian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A federal proposal to make the Sierra Nevada as comfortable as possible for some of their rarest amphibian inhabitants has stirred a backlash from business owners over the economic pain it could cause the region's recreation industry. Many opponents worry the proposal would do more to protect frogs and toads than nonnative trout - a top tourist draw in mountain resort communities where cash registers ring up purchases by vacationers, hikers and fishing enthusiasts this time of year.
HEALTH
July 13, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
Inner thighs are a problem area for a lot of women. This move can help tone that harder-to-work area while giving your abs a workout at the same time. You'll definitely feel it the next day, says Pop Pilates founder Cassey Ho, who uses it in on her Blogilates YouTube channel. What it does The move strengthens your adductor muscles and, in the advanced version, gives your abdominal muscles a challenging workout as well. What to do Start by lying on the mat on your back with knees bent above your hips in a tabletop position.
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