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OPINION
November 7, 1999
How interesting it is to compare today's front pages to those you are reprinting from the passing century. The most notable difference is the amount of news packed into a front page of years ago. For example, Oct. 26, 1945, had 22 news stories on its front page. The Oct. 30, 1999, front page has seven stories and a feature. There's about as much news on the front page of today's newspaper as there is on the local TV news. BOB MENDES Glendora
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | Bob Pool
Leon Rudek loved his newspaper job so much that he constructed a sidewalk in front of his house out of front pages. Pedestrians walking along La Prada Street in Highland Park step back in time as they pass by concrete "editions" of newspapers reporting the news that "Yankees KO Dodgers, Again," or "Argentina Invades Falklands" and "How Carter Saved Summit. " All in screaming headlines. And those who take a closer look may notice that dozens of the front pages cover the bottom of the slope behind his house, and hundreds more serve as roofing shingles on the garage-workshop.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1987
The department of communications at Cal State Fullerton will hold an open house to unveil a permanent display of 26 historical newspaper front pages at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 6 on the second floor of the Humanities building. There will be refreshments and a raffle to aid the John Stewart Memorial Scholarship Fund. Free parking is available in Faculty Lot E. For information call Pat or Peggy O'Donnell at (714) 963-4466.
OPINION
June 22, 2013
Re "A colorful life of contrasts," Column One, and "Calabasas wrestles with the Bieber effect," June 20 I found these two front-page stories of interest, but I can't help wondering if The Times actually intended to make a point by featuring these contrasting articles so close to each other. On the one hand, outgoing Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, having fought and finally accepted his homosexuality and currently battling cancer, lives a seemingly happy life in Mar Vista surrounded by friends and causes, totally disinterested in materialism and the Hollywood lifestyle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 2,500 copies of Tuesday's Times were wrapped with a fake front page criticizing U.S. involvement in El Salvador and the newspaper's coverage of events there. The crudely fashioned pages appeared in newspaper racks from Santa Monica to South-Central Los Angeles. A spokesman claiming to represent an unnamed group responsible for the bogus front pages told United Press International that The Times was targeted because its El Salvador coverage "is biased."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | Bob Pool
Leon Rudek loved his newspaper job so much that he constructed a sidewalk in front of his house out of front pages. Pedestrians walking along La Prada Street in Highland Park step back in time as they pass by concrete "editions" of newspapers reporting the news that "Yankees KO Dodgers, Again," or "Argentina Invades Falklands" and "How Carter Saved Summit. " All in screaming headlines. And those who take a closer look may notice that dozens of the front pages cover the bottom of the slope behind his house, and hundreds more serve as roofing shingles on the garage-workshop.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | Russ Stanton, Editor, Los Angeles Times
From its inception on Dec. 4, 1881, the Los Angeles Times has been an integral part of this great city. Our metropolis has changed dramatically over the last 130 years, but one thing has remained constant: The Los Angeles Times has landed on doorsteps -- and now computer screens and cellphones -- every single day. Our commitment to covering the news -- the first draft of history, as Phillip Graham famously called it -- is unwavering....
WORLD
April 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Leading daily newspapers came out with blank front pages to protest a media law they say undermines press freedom. The papers ran empty front pages except for a call for the abolition of the law. Broadsheet as well as tabloid dailies object chiefly to a clause that forces newspapers to run responses from people they have reported on, even if the published information is true. They fear they will be overwhelmed by politicians' requests to print their reactions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999
I'm sure I'm not alone in my appreciation of your series, "Stories That Shaped the Century." It complements nicely several outstanding series about the 20th century that have aired on the History Channel and PBS. It is fascinating to see the reproductions of the front pages and to read your analysis of the events in light of subsequent developments. RICHARD E. GOODMAN Camarillo
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
MENLO PARK, Calif. - For some users, Facebook's front page used to grab their attention with the latest news from friends but had become a jumbled morass of random updates and photos. Their attention had increasingly begun to wander to shiny new offerings from Instagram, Pinterest and Snapchat. Now Facebook is hoping to get people to stick around with a sweeping face lift to its most popular feature: News Feed, the steady stream of updates that users see when they log on to the social network.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
The Archives can provide commemorative front pages of the Los Angeles Times as far back as the year 1900. Your commemorative Front Page becomes a part of your home or office. It arrives ready for framing in a location of your choice. The special quality reproductions are designed to last forever, and your front page can always be enjoyed by reading about events that happened on that special day! These high quality, photograph-style reproductions come in two sizes, 11" x 14" and 18" x 24", $25 and $35, respectively.
SPORTS
November 17, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Unbuckling the mailbag: Question: If UCLA beats USC, will The Times let them be in the Sunday sports page headline? Phillip Para Answer: That's a tough call but we can probably make a one-time exception to get UCLA out on the cover, especially if the Bruins beat the Trojans, 50-0. I'm constantly amused that some UCLA fans can't make the logical connection between program success and how that relates to newspaper coverage. The reason USC has received more "attention" in the last decade might have to do with the Trojans' winning 12 of the last 13 games in the rivalry.
OPINION
September 15, 2012
Reader reaction was strong to Thursday's front-page photo of a mortally wounded J. Christopher Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to Libya. Stevens was killed Tuesday along with three other Americans in an attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. As the article that accompanied the photo noted, he was the first U.S. ambassador killed in the line of duty since 1988. Some readers called the photo graphic, unwarranted, inappropriate, disgraceful, gratuitous and insensitive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Deirdre Edgar
Reader reaction was strong to Thursday's front-page photo of a mortally wounded J. Christopher Stevens, a U.S. ambassador to Libya. Stevens was killed Tuesday along with three other Americans in an attack on the U.S. consulate in Bengazi, Libya. As the article that accompanied the photo noted, he was the first U.S. ambassador killed in the line of duty since 1979. Some readers called the photo graphic, unwarranted, inappropriate, disgraceful, gratuitous and insensitive.  “I feel it was very distasteful and disrespectful to post the picture of Christopher Stevens, in death in such graphic detail, on the front page,” Donna Shontell of Sherman Oaks said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2012 | By Deirdre Edgar
It's Sept. 11: our generation's date that will live in infamy. The attacks on New York and Washington 11 years ago are certainly on the minds of some readers, who wondered why there was no mention of the anniversary on The Times' front page . The Nation page carries a six-column photo and story about observances planned for the day. And the Op-Ed page has a piece by a former Times reporter about explaining 9/11 to her children....
NEWS
January 21, 2000
Just a note of appreciation for the fine article about the Arden family ("A Friend in Need," Jan. 12) and the wonderful outreach by their neighbors and friends. I read Southern California Living every day, and it was so inspiring to have my basic belief that we are good people at heart confirmed. --SALLY RAE SARLOT Via e-mail The article is an example of how we can use the media for strengthening our community. It will say much about our priorities and our society in general the day when articles like this appear in the front pages.
NEWS
June 19, 1992
Now let me get this straight. My tax dollars go to clean up graffiti and vandalism caused by "Guerrilla Matrons" who are funded by my tax dollars that go to their official sponsor, Planned Parenthood ("Fighting Back Via Poster Power," June 9). What's the difference between graffiti vandal Chaka and the "Guerrilla Matrons"? One goes to jail; the other goes to the front pages of View. And I am indeed so grateful that The Times took time out from pontificating on the Earth summit to canonize these littering blighters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Of the foreign journalists who had been alerted to a shocking political protest against South Vietnam's U.S.-supported government, only one - Malcolm Browne of the Associated Press - arrived in June 1963 to document it. His photos of Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc setting himself ablaze on a Saigon street ran on front pages around the world and prompted President Kennedy to order a reevaluation of his administration's Vietnam policy. "No news picture in history has generated so much emotion as that one," Kennedy said, according to the 2006 book "Cold War Mandarin.
OPINION
December 31, 2011
Most years, in the days following Dec. 25 (and, to a lesser degree, many of the major holidays, such as July 4 and Memorial Day), several readers write to The Times to express their displeasure over what they view as not enough coverage of the holiday. This Christmas was no different. Reader Ana Barbure of Hermosa Beach thought something significant was missing from Sunday's paper: a holiday greeting. "I was extremely disappointed to see that the Sunday paper did not wish readers a happy Christmas," she wrote.
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