Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFrontal Lobe
IN THE NEWS

Frontal Lobe

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
May 30, 2005 | Jamie Talan, Newsday
Scientists have discovered comedy central in the brain -- specific tissue regulating the ability to understand sarcasm. People with damage to the right frontal lobe, right behind the eyes, are unable to appreciate this kind of humor. In sarcasm, "the literal meaning is different from the true meaning, and some people just don't understand that difference," said Simone Shamay-Tsoory, a psychologist at the Rambam Medical Center and the University of Haifa in Israel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2011 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The family of Giants fan Bryan Stow issued a call for civility among rival sports fans and asked people to help catch the two suspects. At a news conference Tuesday outside County-USC Medical Center, where Stow remains in a coma due to a brain injury he sustained during a beating at the Dodger Stadium parking lot on opening day, the family thanked the public for their support and prayers. Stow is a father of two and a paramedic who made a road trip from Santa Cruz to attend the game.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 26, 1986 | Associated Press
The Kansas City Royals said Friday that Manager Dick Howser will undergo about five weeks of radiation treatments for the cancerous tumor found in his brain earlier this week. But the team declined to provide detailed results of pathological tests. The club released a statement saying that Dr. Charles Clough, the neurosurgeon who operated on Howser Tuesday at St.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a Vietnamese jungle on Sept. 4, 1969, the stubby bullet of a Russian-made AK-47 ripped into the skull of Army Spc. Leonard Rugh, then 24. It didn't stop until it had torn through his brain's right frontal lobe, powered its way through the right parietal lobe and lodged itself in the dome of his helmet. Against all odds, Rugh survived. But what happened after bespeaks the critical importance of the society that surrounds a survivor of penetrating brain injury. In Rugh's case, no one in the world beyond his hospital bed was more important than his bride of three years, Luanna Rugh, who remains, 42 years later, his chief cheerleader and primary caregiver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Children may learn new languages more quickly than adults do because they use a different area of the brain, New York researchers report today in Nature. Using magnetic resonance imaging on 12 volunteers, Joy Hirsch and colleagues at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College found that children process all their languages in one small part of the brain, while adults who learn a new language are forced to create a new storage area.
HEALTH
April 5, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN
The ability to laugh at a good joke has a lot to do with your brain's frontal lobe. If you have damage there, punch lines may whiz right by you. But the slapstick humor of the Three Stooges could leave you in stitches, according to new research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999
Bravo to The Times for its recent insightful series on the broken contract with the mentally ill. Reform of the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act is badly needed and should not be lost in the din of a vocal minority insisting that mentally ill people have the right to make unwise decisions just like the rest of the population. I shudder at the logic of an outspoken client network member telling me my suicidally depressed father was entitled to kill himself if he chose. This libertarian thinking ignores what recent science has discovered about the damage to the frontal lobe of the brain in mentally ill people that prevents them from realizing they are ill and prevents them from seeing any hope for a better life.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County jury decided Tuesday that 92-year-old Alfred Pohlmeier was legally insane when he strangled his wife of 62 years to quiet her incessant coughing. After deliberating one day, the jury found that Pohlmeier was suffering from two brain injuries when he reached out on Sept. 13, 1995, and violently choked his 86-year-old wife to death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County jury decided Tuesday that 92-year-old Alfred Pohlmeier was legally insane when he strangled his wife of 62 years to quiet her incessant coughing. After deliberating one day, the jury found that Pohlmeier was suffering from two brain injuries when he choked his 86-year-old wife to death Sept. 13, 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2011 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The family of Giants fan Bryan Stow issued a call for civility among rival sports fans and asked people to help catch the two suspects. At a news conference Tuesday outside County-USC Medical Center, where Stow remains in a coma due to a brain injury he sustained during a beating at the Dodger Stadium parking lot on opening day, the family thanked the public for their support and prayers. Stow is a father of two and a paramedic who made a road trip from Santa Cruz to attend the game.
HEALTH
May 30, 2005 | Jamie Talan, Newsday
Scientists have discovered comedy central in the brain -- specific tissue regulating the ability to understand sarcasm. People with damage to the right frontal lobe, right behind the eyes, are unable to appreciate this kind of humor. In sarcasm, "the literal meaning is different from the true meaning, and some people just don't understand that difference," said Simone Shamay-Tsoory, a psychologist at the Rambam Medical Center and the University of Haifa in Israel.
SCIENCE
April 28, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A preliminary study at UC San Diego has found promising signs that using gene therapy to introduce nerve growth factor into the brain may retard the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The team, led by Dr. Mark H. Tuszynski, studied five women and three men, with an average age of 70, who were in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The study focused on determining the safety of the procedure and not its effectiveness.
HEALTH
February 11, 2002 | JAMIE TALAN, NEWSDAY
A snippet of tissue in the brain's frontal lobe has become the focus of science's quest to find exactly where we get our sense of who we are. Several recent experiments pinpoint the lobe's right hemisphere as the locus of our identity. The study of brain diseases has been a factor in illuminating the research into "self." People who seem to have lost their sense of self are now said to be suffering from a condition called frontotemporal dementia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999
Bravo to The Times for its recent insightful series on the broken contract with the mentally ill. Reform of the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act is badly needed and should not be lost in the din of a vocal minority insisting that mentally ill people have the right to make unwise decisions just like the rest of the population. I shudder at the logic of an outspoken client network member telling me my suicidally depressed father was entitled to kill himself if he chose. This libertarian thinking ignores what recent science has discovered about the damage to the frontal lobe of the brain in mentally ill people that prevents them from realizing they are ill and prevents them from seeing any hope for a better life.
HEALTH
April 5, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN
The ability to laugh at a good joke has a lot to do with your brain's frontal lobe. If you have damage there, punch lines may whiz right by you. But the slapstick humor of the Three Stooges could leave you in stitches, according to new research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Children may learn new languages more quickly than adults do because they use a different area of the brain, New York researchers report today in Nature. Using magnetic resonance imaging on 12 volunteers, Joy Hirsch and colleagues at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College found that children process all their languages in one small part of the brain, while adults who learn a new language are forced to create a new storage area.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a Vietnamese jungle on Sept. 4, 1969, the stubby bullet of a Russian-made AK-47 ripped into the skull of Army Spc. Leonard Rugh, then 24. It didn't stop until it had torn through his brain's right frontal lobe, powered its way through the right parietal lobe and lodged itself in the dome of his helmet. Against all odds, Rugh survived. But what happened after bespeaks the critical importance of the society that surrounds a survivor of penetrating brain injury. In Rugh's case, no one in the world beyond his hospital bed was more important than his bride of three years, Luanna Rugh, who remains, 42 years later, his chief cheerleader and primary caregiver.
HEALTH
February 11, 2002 | JAMIE TALAN, NEWSDAY
A snippet of tissue in the brain's frontal lobe has become the focus of science's quest to find exactly where we get our sense of who we are. Several recent experiments pinpoint the lobe's right hemisphere as the locus of our identity. The study of brain diseases has been a factor in illuminating the research into "self." People who seem to have lost their sense of self are now said to be suffering from a condition called frontotemporal dementia.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County jury decided Tuesday that 92-year-old Alfred Pohlmeier was legally insane when he strangled his wife of 62 years to quiet her incessant coughing. After deliberating one day, the jury found that Pohlmeier was suffering from two brain injuries when he reached out on Sept. 13, 1995, and violently choked his 86-year-old wife to death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County jury decided Tuesday that 92-year-old Alfred Pohlmeier was legally insane when he strangled his wife of 62 years to quiet her incessant coughing. After deliberating one day, the jury found that Pohlmeier was suffering from two brain injuries when he choked his 86-year-old wife to death Sept. 13, 1995.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|