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NEWS
October 26, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
High-fructose corn syrup is often singled out as Food Enemy No. 1 because it has become ubiquitous in processed foods over about the last 30 years – a period that coincides with a steep rise in obesity. One of the primary sources of HFCS in the American diet is soda – in fact, many public health advocates refer to soda as “liquid candy.” That nickname is more apt than advocates realized, according to a study published online this month by the journal Obesity.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
A consumer group is taking aim at high-fructose corn syrup in soft drinks, arguing that it and other sweeteners are responsible for high obesity rates and health problems because Americans drink too much soda. The Center for Science in the Public Interest filed a petition Wednesday with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration urging the agency to require beverage makers to reduce the amount of high-fructose corn syrup and other sweeteners. "In the past 10 years or so, researchers have done a variety of experiments and studies that connect soft drinks to obesity" and other health problems, said Michael F. Jacobson, executive director of the consumer group.
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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Researchers from USC and the University of Oxford say they have found an association between countries that have more high fructose corn syrup in their food supply and those that have higher rates of diabetes. Countries with higher use of HFCS had an average prevalence of Type 2 diabetes of 8%, compared with 6.7% in countries that don't use it, according to the research published Tuesday in the journal Global Public Health. Those differences held, the researchers said, after adjustments for body mass index, population and gross domestic product.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Researchers from USC and the University of Oxford say they have found an association between countries that have more high fructose corn syrup in their food supply and those that have higher rates of diabetes. Countries with higher use of HFCS had an average prevalence of Type 2 diabetes of 8%, compared with 6.7% in countries that don't use it, according to the research published Tuesday in the journal Global Public Health. Those differences held, the researchers said, after adjustments for body mass index, population and gross domestic product.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Mexico's Commerce Ministry said it decided to levy definitive tariffs on imports of U.S.-made fructose after finding U.S. producers sold it below cost and were damaging the country's sugar industry. Fructose is a liquid sweetener made from corn that is used by the soft-drink industry as a substitute for sugar. The decision comes six months after the government imposed preliminary dumping tariffs on U.S.-made fructose.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Move over salt. Step aside, saturated fat. There's a new public enemy in the pantry, and it's … sugar. In a provocative commentary coming out in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature, Dr. Robert Lustig  and two colleagues from UC San Francisco argue that the added sugars in processed foods and drinks are responsible for so many cases of chronic disease and premature deaths that their use ought to be regulated, just like alcohol and...
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | From Reuters
Rats that eat high levels of a natural sugar known as fructose seem to age faster than other rats--and the same could be true for people who eat too much sweet junk food, Israeli researchers said Monday. Fructose, found naturally in honey and fruit, is used widely in foods ranging from soft drinks to yogurt. Although its sweet taste is popular, the sugar could cause wrinkles and health problems, the researchers said. Dr.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1986
The Emeryville, Calif.-based biotechnology company said one of the patents was its third in interleukin-2, a protein that has shown promise as a potential treatment for cancer. The other patents were for a hybrid protein of interferon, also cited as a potential treatment for cancer and infectious diseases, and an enzyme and related methods involving the production of fructose, a form of sugar.
NEWS
November 9, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
If you're a regular reader of Booster Shots, you are well aware that drinking lots of sugar-sweetened beverages is bad for your health. Primarily, those empty calories do damage to your waistline and are a major contributor to the steady weight gain of Americans over the last several decades. But a study published online Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Assn. gives women another reason to avoid the drinks: They can increase the risk of gout. According to the Mayo Clinic , “Gout is a complex form of arthritis characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness and tenderness in joints, often the joint at the base of the big toe. …  An acute attack of gout can wake you up in the middle of the night feeling like your big toe is on fire.
SCIENCE
November 8, 2009 | Karen Kaplan
To many people, it's a health food. To others, it's simply soda in disguise. That virtuous glass of juice is feeling the squeeze as doctors, scientists and public health authorities step up their efforts to reduce the nation's girth. It's an awkward issue for the schools that peddle juice in their cafeterias and vending machines. It's uncomfortable for advocates of a junk-food tax who say they can't afford to target juice and alienate its legions of fans. It's confusing for consumers who think they're doing something good when they chug their morning OJ, sip 22-ounce smoothies or pack apple juice in their children's lunches.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | David Lazarus
There's chutzpah and then there's just plain wrong. The Corn Refiners Assn., stung by accusations that high-fructose corn syrup is a leading cause of the obesity epidemic, applied to the Food and Drug Administration a couple of years ago for permission to change the name of the refiners' product to the more pleasant-sounding "corn sugar. " The FDA has finally issued its ruling: No. "The use of the term 'corn sugar' to describe high-fructose corn syrup - a product that is a syrup - would not accurately identify or describe the basic nature of the food or its characteristics," Tamara Ward, an agency spokeswoman, told me. "Under FDA regulations, a sugar is a solid, dried and crystallized food, whereas syrup is an aqueous solution or liquid food," she said.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
It appears high fructose corn syrup will still be called high fructose corn syrup. On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration denied a petition by the Corn Refiners Assn. (filed in 2010) to allow “corn sugar” as an alternate name for HFCS. The letter , sent to Audrae Erickson, president of the Corn Refiners Assn., rejected the petition for a variety of reasons. Some seemed a little pedantic -- syrup, in the public's mind, is liquid, whereas sugar is generally deemed solid and crystalline, the FDA said  -- but others more significant.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The Food and Drug Administration rejected a petition from the Corn Refiners Assn. to rename high-fructose corn syrup “corn sugar,” saying that the change could confuse consumers and “pose a public health concern.” In a letter to association President Audrae Erickson made public Wednesday evening, the federal agency told the industry group that using “corn sugar” on nutrition labels could even prove dangerous for customers who...
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Rats fed fructose-laced drinking water for six weeks performed more slowly in a maze-navigating task, UCLA researchers have found. (Read this L.A. Times opinion article .) They think the effect is due to changes in the way the brain responds to insulin as a result of exposure to fructose. “Our study shows that a high fructose diet harms the brain as well as the body,” study senior author and UCLA professor Fernando Gomez-Pinilla said in a release about the finding, which was published in the Journal of Physiology (postdoc Rahul Agrawal was first author)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
They are the two bad boys of the American diet, linked to a variety of ailments including obesity, diabetes and tooth decay. But now sugar is taking high fructose corn syrup to court in a landmark battle over which is the greater evil. In a lawsuit that goes before a Los Angeles federal judge Wednesday, sugar producers accuse their corn industry rivals of false advertising in a campaign that casts the liquid sweetener as "nutritionally the same as table sugar" and claims "your body can't tell the difference.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Move over salt. Step aside, saturated fat. There's a new public enemy in the pantry, and it's … sugar. In a provocative commentary coming out in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature, Dr. Robert Lustig  and two colleagues from UC San Francisco argue that the added sugars in processed foods and drinks are responsible for so many cases of chronic disease and premature deaths that their use ought to be regulated, just like alcohol and...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | Michael Phillips
"Bandslam" is a pretty good movie given that the odds of it having been a pretty bad movie were steep. On its face, it sounds like the highest-possible fructose corn syrup: Lonely new kid in town, pours his heart out in unanswered letters to David Bowie, becomes manager of teen band fronted by cutest girl on planet. If band wins big Bandslam contest, it's a record deal and fame and so long, high school, it's been good to know ya'. Here's the surprise: "Bandslam" may come from synthetic materials, but the characters are a little more complicated than usual.
HEALTH
October 27, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Irritable bowel syndrome -- a condition that causes abdominal discomfort, bloating and constipation or diarrhea in about 10% to 15% of Americans -- may be triggered by fructose in some people, conclude University of Iowa researchers. In a study involving 80 people with IBS, the researchers found that 31 were fructose intolerant. Those who were fructose intolerant and able to maintain a mostly fructose-free diet for at least six months had a significant improvement in symptoms.
OPINION
September 13, 2011
The makers of high-fructose corn syrup would understandably like to change the image of their product, which has gained a reputation as the trans fat of the sugar world. In fact, as sales sink, they'd prefer a name change altogether — to corn sugar — and have asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for permission to use it on food labels. The liquid sweetener is a natural food, a Corn Refiners Assn. advertising campaign claims, and nutritionally the same as any other sugar.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
The diet of modern Americans bears little resemblance to the foods our ancestors ate, and this discrepancy is often noted in discussions about the causes of the current “obesity epidemic.” The argument goes like this: Since fat and sugar were historically hard to come by, our bodies are built to hold on to them to help us get through the lean times. This may have served us well in the caveman days, but not so much in the era of the KFC Double Down sandwich. Dr. David Ludwig, director of the Optimal Weight for Life program at Children's Hospital Boston, takes a fascinating look at how innovations in food technology have backfired for humankind over the millenia in this week’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
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