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BUSINESS
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
Mexico lost its appeal against a World Trade Organization ruling that its system of taxes on soft drinks sweetened with anything other than cane sugar syrup violated trade rules. The WTO's appeals panel upheld the findings of a trade panel backing the United States, which argued that the system, including a distribution tax, discriminated against other sweeteners such as beet sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | Reuters
Mexico has given the United States until today to accept imports of its surplus sugar or it would take the dispute before a North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration panel, a sugar official said. "If the American proposals . . . are not satisfactory, . . . we will request an arbitration panel," said Carlos Seoane, president of Mexico's National Sugar and Alcohol Chamber, after a meeting with the trade ministry last week.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Agricultural subsidies are contributing to the obesity epidemic in the U.S. and should be revised to help improve public health, Canadian researchers say. Agriculture policy “remains largely uninformed by public health discourse,” they write in an article published Tuesday in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Government farm subsidies have helped create an inexpensive food supply with the sorts of foods that lead to obesity, they said. That's a position about which there is a great deal of contention, with some arguing that inexpensive commodity prices do not do much to reduce retail prices; and that other countries with high subsidies do not have high obesity rates.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
You can spot Dawn Wynne at the grocery store. She's one of those conscientious label readers busy studying cans, bottles and jars in aisle after aisle. But it's not calories, sodium or preservatives she is looking for. She is on patrol for high fructose corn syrup; it's an unadvertised part of sauces, cereal, candy and especially soda, and she wants none of it. The Redondo Beach resident looks for foods sweetened with "pure cane sugar, honey or fruit juice."
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
We've been checking out the many energy and snack bars on the market, and it seems there are plenty of choices for people who need or want to avoid gluten. Some of them announce it on the front of the label; others require closer reading of the nutrition information. For people who don't eat gluten by choice, there are lots of bars that don't include wheat, rye or barley as an ingredient but warn the bars are made in facilities that might house those products. That's important information for people with celiac disease -- even a small bit of gluten can make them sick.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
What to do if you don't like/disagree with the findings of a scientific study? For some, it appears that the answer is to start a petition to have the study retracted, and to accuse the researchers of bias and being in the pay of nefarious industry concerns. After days of heated reaction to a study published last week about organic foods, north of 2,900 people have signed the petition, at change.org, calling for the paper to be withdrawn. Here are the nuts and bolts of the report by Stanford University scientists, which was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine : The researchers pooled together studies addressing the health benefits of organic and conventionally grown foods.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
As obesity rates increase, so too do obesity-related health problems and associated costs. Still, a federal health advisory panel has formally recommended additional care in the form of intensive counseling. Commenting on the panel's decision, my colleague Paul Whitefield argues that we can't afford it. "The solution?" he writes . "It's not government-approved and insurance-paid-for counseling. It's a fat tax. " He continues: You want to be obese? Fine. Keep chowing down, big guy or gal. Just don't expect those who pursue sensible, healthful choices to pay for you. Instead, you're gonna pay a tax on all that extra weight, which will help offset the healthcare costs you're sure to incur.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
In the war against pests, the lowly cockroach makes for a fearsome adversary. It can go weeks without water, survive decapitation for a time - and, like any proper super-villain, can send humans screaming from a room. Now researchers have discovered how some roaches have eluded humans' once-infallible traps: They have evolved so that glucose-sweetened bait tastes bitter. The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, solves a 20-year mystery and sheds light on the cockroach's powerful ability to adapt.
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