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Fructose

FOOD
September 7, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I recently found out that I am diabetic, so now I read all the ingredient labels on foods to see if they contain sugar. Some names are obvious, like sugar, corn syrup, dextrose, etc. But there are more that are harder to figure out. I wondered if you could print a list of the various names and forms of sugar that we would find in food.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
Mexico lost its appeal against a World Trade Organization ruling that its system of taxes on soft drinks sweetened with anything other than cane sugar syrup violated trade rules. The WTO's appeals panel upheld the findings of a trade panel backing the United States, which argued that the system, including a distribution tax, discriminated against other sweeteners such as beet sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For parents looking to sneak some nutrition into their kids' school lunches, brightly packaged fruity snacks — many of which promise they're the equivalent of a serving of fruit or more — are undoubtedly tempting. After all, the plastic-wrapped bars, sticks, rolls and strips contain no pits, seeds or cores and require no washing, peeling or slicing. And kids tend to eat them without any fuss. But convenience aside, parents shouldn't kid themselves. "They're not as good as eating regular fruit," no matter the promises on the package, says Mark Kantor, professor of nutrition and food science at the University of Maryland in College Park.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | Reuters
Mexico has given the United States until today to accept imports of its surplus sugar or it would take the dispute before a North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration panel, a sugar official said. "If the American proposals . . . are not satisfactory, . . . we will request an arbitration panel," said Carlos Seoane, president of Mexico's National Sugar and Alcohol Chamber, after a meeting with the trade ministry last week.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
You can spot Dawn Wynne at the grocery store. She's one of those conscientious label readers busy studying cans, bottles and jars in aisle after aisle. But it's not calories, sodium or preservatives she is looking for. She is on patrol for high fructose corn syrup; it's an unadvertised part of sauces, cereal, candy and especially soda, and she wants none of it. The Redondo Beach resident looks for foods sweetened with "pure cane sugar, honey or fruit juice."
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Lucas Cruikshank and his hyperactive Fred character had millions of YouTube fans and a line of merchandise when Hollywood came calling. Then a manager from the Collective pitched the Nebraska teenager a vision for his squeaky-voiced character that would result, three years later, in a holiday album, three made-for-TV movies, and a series on Nickelodeon. "So many people in the industry didn't know if you could take something on the Internet and cross it over to mainstream TV and movies," said Cruikshank, now 18. "It felt really good to prove them wrong.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Agricultural subsidies are contributing to the obesity epidemic in the U.S. and should be revised to help improve public health, Canadian researchers say. Agriculture policy “remains largely uninformed by public health discourse,” they write in an article published Tuesday in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Government farm subsidies have helped create an inexpensive food supply with the sorts of foods that lead to obesity, they said. That's a position about which there is a great deal of contention, with some arguing that inexpensive commodity prices do not do much to reduce retail prices; and that other countries with high subsidies do not have high obesity rates.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
In the war against pests, the lowly cockroach makes for a fearsome adversary. It can go weeks without water, survive decapitation for a time - and, like any proper super-villain, can send humans screaming from a room. Now researchers have discovered how some roaches have eluded humans' once-infallible traps: They have evolved so that glucose-sweetened bait tastes bitter. The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, solves a 20-year mystery and sheds light on the cockroach's powerful ability to adapt.
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