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NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Prop. 37 may have failed, but litigation against genetically modified ingredients goes on. Here's a new one: Pepperidge Farm has been sued in Colorado for claiming that its Goldfish crackers are “natural” when they contain ingredients derived from genetically engineered  soybeans. The plaintiff, Sonya Bolerjack, wants upward of $5 million in damages. Read an account, plus some industry and lawyer opinions at the website FoodNavigator.com. Also at this food and beverage litigation update provided by the law firm Shook, Hardy & Bacon.
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BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Lucas Cruikshank and his hyperactive Fred character had millions of YouTube fans and a line of merchandise when Hollywood came calling. Then a manager from the Collective pitched the Nebraska teenager a vision for his squeaky-voiced character that would result, three years later, in a holiday album, three made-for-TV movies, and a series on Nickelodeon. "So many people in the industry didn't know if you could take something on the Internet and cross it over to mainstream TV and movies," said Cruikshank, now 18. "It felt really good to prove them wrong.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
As obesity rates increase, so too do obesity-related health problems and associated costs. Still, a federal health advisory panel has formally recommended additional care in the form of intensive counseling. Commenting on the panel's decision, my colleague Paul Whitefield argues that we can't afford it. "The solution?" he writes . "It's not government-approved and insurance-paid-for counseling. It's a fat tax. " He continues: You want to be obese? Fine. Keep chowing down, big guy or gal. Just don't expect those who pursue sensible, healthful choices to pay for you. Instead, you're gonna pay a tax on all that extra weight, which will help offset the healthcare costs you're sure to incur.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge said he intends to dismiss a class-action lawsuit alleging that Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc., Tate & Lyle and Cerestar fix prices in the $2-billion market for high-fructose corn syrup. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Mihm told lawyers in a conference call Wednesday that he plans to dismiss the lawsuit filed in September 1995 by PepsiCo Inc., the Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food companies.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
In the war against pests, the lowly cockroach makes for a fearsome adversary. It can go weeks without water, survive decapitation for a time - and, like any proper super-villain, can send humans screaming from a room. Now researchers have discovered how some roaches have eluded humans' once-infallible traps: They have evolved so that glucose-sweetened bait tastes bitter. The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, solves a 20-year mystery and sheds light on the cockroach's powerful ability to adapt.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
One of the more serious complications of diabetes is a disabling condition called diabetic neuropathy. Because people with diabetes have excessive levels of blood sugar, nerves can become damaged, causing sharp pain that disturbs sleep, numbness in the hands or feet, digestive problems, ulcerations that can lead to foot amputations, and even sudden death if the nerves to the heart are affected.
HEALTH
April 14, 2012
Case for the prosecution Sodas, candy bars and sweet breakfast cereals are entwined in modern life - along with a lot of other questionable choices and bad habits. It's hard to know exactly what all of that sugar is doing to our bodies, but scientists are making headway. Some not-so-sweet findings: • In an unusual - and revealing - experiment from 2011, researchers at UC Davis fed 48 young adults a sugary but carefully controlled diet. In just two weeks, subjects who got 25% of their calories from either fructose or high-fructose corn syrup saw a jump in their cholesterol levels.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter
Are farm subsidies making us fat? Billions in taxpayer dollars are going to support high fructose corn syrup and three other common food additives used in junk food, according to a report released this week by the California Public Interest Research Group and the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, both consumer advocacy groups. The report, "Apples to Twinkies: Comparing Federal Subsidies of Fresh Produce and Junk Food," makes the case that federal farm subsidies are helping feed the nation's obesity epidemic.
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