YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFructose


August 2, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
You can spot Dawn Wynne at the grocery store. She's one of those conscientious label readers busy studying cans, bottles and jars in aisle after aisle. But it's not calories, sodium or preservatives she is looking for. She is on patrol for high fructose corn syrup; it's an unadvertised part of sauces, cereal, candy and especially soda, and she wants none of it. The Redondo Beach resident looks for foods sweetened with "pure cane sugar, honey or fruit juice."
March 5, 2013 | David Lazarus
If you want to dance, you've got to pay the piper. And if you want to zip along the 91 Express Lanes in Orange County, you have to pay a toll of as much as $9.55 per trip. James Kritikson, 72, of La Verne never paid the toll, so he received a notice in the mail saying he had to cough up the unpaid fee, plus a penalty of $25. If he didn't come clean by March 28, the penalty would jump to $100. There was just one problem: On the date - Jan. 25 - and at the time - 10:16 p.m. - that the notice said Kritikson was sneering at the 91 Express Lanes' toll system, he was in fact home with his wife watching TV, and his car was in the garage.
November 15, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Prop. 37 may have failed, but litigation against genetically modified ingredients goes on. Here's a new one: Pepperidge Farm has been sued in Colorado for claiming that its Goldfish crackers are “natural” when they contain ingredients derived from genetically engineered  soybeans. The plaintiff, Sonya Bolerjack, wants upward of $5 million in damages. Read an account, plus some industry and lawyer opinions at the website Also at this food and beverage litigation update provided by the law firm Shook, Hardy & Bacon.
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
July 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge said he intends to dismiss a class-action lawsuit alleging that Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc., Tate & Lyle and Cerestar fix prices in the $2-billion market for high-fructose corn syrup. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Mihm told lawyers in a conference call Wednesday that he plans to dismiss the lawsuit filed in September 1995 by PepsiCo Inc., the Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food companies.
July 4, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
One of the more serious complications of diabetes is a disabling condition called diabetic neuropathy. Because people with diabetes have excessive levels of blood sugar, nerves can become damaged, causing sharp pain that disturbs sleep, numbness in the hands or feet, digestive problems, ulcerations that can lead to foot amputations, and even sudden death if the nerves to the heart are affected.
April 14, 2012
Case for the prosecution Sodas, candy bars and sweet breakfast cereals are entwined in modern life - along with a lot of other questionable choices and bad habits. It's hard to know exactly what all of that sugar is doing to our bodies, but scientists are making headway. Some not-so-sweet findings: • In an unusual - and revealing - experiment from 2011, researchers at UC Davis fed 48 young adults a sugary but carefully controlled diet. In just two weeks, subjects who got 25% of their calories from either fructose or high-fructose corn syrup saw a jump in their cholesterol levels.
April 16, 1987 | Associated Press
The secret of how the fruit got inside the liquid-filled, chocolate-covered cherries is almost as much of a mystery as how the ship got inside the bottle. The process by which these unique candies are created relies on a chemical reaction that actually takes place after the candy is made, says Dr. David Chisdes, an American Chemical Society member affiliated with a major candy company.
January 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Knowing what ingredients are in the foods we buy and eat is important – even when you’re in a rush at the market. Here's a cellphone app that might help, and it's free. Fooducate , a website dedicated to helping all of us to eat a little healthier, has launched a new iPhone app that allows you to scan or type in a bar code and receive an overall grade rating for a product. The grade is based on certain "bad" ingredients -- too much sugar and salt, too many additives, too much high-fructose corn syrup, etc. (Download from the iTunes App Store.
Los Angeles Times Articles