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BUSINESS
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
Mexico lost its appeal against a World Trade Organization ruling that its system of taxes on soft drinks sweetened with anything other than cane sugar syrup violated trade rules. The WTO's appeals panel upheld the findings of a trade panel backing the United States, which argued that the system, including a distribution tax, discriminated against other sweeteners such as beet sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
You can spot Dawn Wynne at the grocery store. She's one of those conscientious label readers busy studying cans, bottles and jars in aisle after aisle. But it's not calories, sodium or preservatives she is looking for. She is on patrol for high fructose corn syrup; it's an unadvertised part of sauces, cereal, candy and especially soda, and she wants none of it. The Redondo Beach resident looks for foods sweetened with "pure cane sugar, honey or fruit juice."
BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | Reuters
Mexico has given the United States until today to accept imports of its surplus sugar or it would take the dispute before a North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration panel, a sugar official said. "If the American proposals . . . are not satisfactory, . . . we will request an arbitration panel," said Carlos Seoane, president of Mexico's National Sugar and Alcohol Chamber, after a meeting with the trade ministry last week.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
As obesity rates increase, so too do obesity-related health problems and associated costs. Still, a federal health advisory panel has formally recommended additional care in the form of intensive counseling. Commenting on the panel's decision, my colleague Paul Whitefield argues that we can't afford it. "The solution?" he writes . "It's not government-approved and insurance-paid-for counseling. It's a fat tax. " He continues: You want to be obese? Fine. Keep chowing down, big guy or gal. Just don't expect those who pursue sensible, healthful choices to pay for you. Instead, you're gonna pay a tax on all that extra weight, which will help offset the healthcare costs you're sure to incur.
SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A rapidly mutating virus has leaped from plants to honeybees, where it is reproducing and contributing to the collapse of colonies vital to the multibillion-dollar agricultural industry, according to a new study. Tobacco ringspot virus, a pollen-borne pathogen that causes blight in soy crops, was found during routine screening of commercial honeybees at a U.S. Department of Agriculture laboratory, where further study revealed the RNA virus was replicating inside its Apis mellifera hosts and spreading to mites that travel from bee to bee, according to the study published online Tuesday in the journal mBio.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge said he intends to dismiss a class-action lawsuit alleging that Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc., Tate & Lyle and Cerestar fix prices in the $2-billion market for high-fructose corn syrup. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Mihm told lawyers in a conference call Wednesday that he plans to dismiss the lawsuit filed in September 1995 by PepsiCo Inc., the Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food companies.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter
Are farm subsidies making us fat? Billions in taxpayer dollars are going to support high fructose corn syrup and three other common food additives used in junk food, according to a report released this week by the California Public Interest Research Group and the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, both consumer advocacy groups. The report, "Apples to Twinkies: Comparing Federal Subsidies of Fresh Produce and Junk Food," makes the case that federal farm subsidies are helping feed the nation's obesity epidemic.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Knowing what ingredients are in the foods we buy and eat is important – even when you’re in a rush at the market. Here's a cellphone app that might help, and it's free. Fooducate , a website dedicated to helping all of us to eat a little healthier, has launched a new iPhone app that allows you to scan or type in a bar code and receive an overall grade rating for a product. The grade is based on certain "bad" ingredients -- too much sugar and salt, too many additives, too much high-fructose corn syrup, etc. (Download from the iTunes App Store.
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