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Fructose

BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
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NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Prop. 37 may have failed, but litigation against genetically modified ingredients goes on. Here's a new one: Pepperidge Farm has been sued in Colorado for claiming that its Goldfish crackers are “natural” when they contain ingredients derived from genetically engineered  soybeans. The plaintiff, Sonya Bolerjack, wants upward of $5 million in damages. Read an account, plus some industry and lawyer opinions at the website FoodNavigator.com. Also at this food and beverage litigation update provided by the law firm Shook, Hardy & Bacon.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
As obesity rates increase, so too do obesity-related health problems and associated costs. Still, a federal health advisory panel has formally recommended additional care in the form of intensive counseling. Commenting on the panel's decision, my colleague Paul Whitefield argues that we can't afford it. "The solution?" he writes . "It's not government-approved and insurance-paid-for counseling. It's a fat tax. " He continues: You want to be obese? Fine. Keep chowing down, big guy or gal. Just don't expect those who pursue sensible, healthful choices to pay for you. Instead, you're gonna pay a tax on all that extra weight, which will help offset the healthcare costs you're sure to incur.
HEALTH
April 14, 2012
Case for the prosecution Sodas, candy bars and sweet breakfast cereals are entwined in modern life - along with a lot of other questionable choices and bad habits. It's hard to know exactly what all of that sugar is doing to our bodies, but scientists are making headway. Some not-so-sweet findings: • In an unusual - and revealing - experiment from 2011, researchers at UC Davis fed 48 young adults a sugary but carefully controlled diet. In just two weeks, subjects who got 25% of their calories from either fructose or high-fructose corn syrup saw a jump in their cholesterol levels.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge said he intends to dismiss a class-action lawsuit alleging that Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc., Tate & Lyle and Cerestar fix prices in the $2-billion market for high-fructose corn syrup. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Mihm told lawyers in a conference call Wednesday that he plans to dismiss the lawsuit filed in September 1995 by PepsiCo Inc., the Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food companies.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
One of the more serious complications of diabetes is a disabling condition called diabetic neuropathy. Because people with diabetes have excessive levels of blood sugar, nerves can become damaged, causing sharp pain that disturbs sleep, numbness in the hands or feet, digestive problems, ulcerations that can lead to foot amputations, and even sudden death if the nerves to the heart are affected.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For parents looking to sneak some nutrition into their kids' school lunches, brightly packaged fruity snacks — many of which promise they're the equivalent of a serving of fruit or more — are undoubtedly tempting. After all, the plastic-wrapped bars, sticks, rolls and strips contain no pits, seeds or cores and require no washing, peeling or slicing. And kids tend to eat them without any fuss. But convenience aside, parents shouldn't kid themselves. "They're not as good as eating regular fruit," no matter the promises on the package, says Mark Kantor, professor of nutrition and food science at the University of Maryland in College Park.
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