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Fructose

BUSINESS
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
Mexico lost its appeal against a World Trade Organization ruling that its system of taxes on soft drinks sweetened with anything other than cane sugar syrup violated trade rules. The WTO's appeals panel upheld the findings of a trade panel backing the United States, which argued that the system, including a distribution tax, discriminated against other sweeteners such as beet sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
You can spot Dawn Wynne at the grocery store. She's one of those conscientious label readers busy studying cans, bottles and jars in aisle after aisle. But it's not calories, sodium or preservatives she is looking for. She is on patrol for high fructose corn syrup; it's an unadvertised part of sauces, cereal, candy and especially soda, and she wants none of it. The Redondo Beach resident looks for foods sweetened with "pure cane sugar, honey or fruit juice."
BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | Reuters
Mexico has given the United States until today to accept imports of its surplus sugar or it would take the dispute before a North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration panel, a sugar official said. "If the American proposals . . . are not satisfactory, . . . we will request an arbitration panel," said Carlos Seoane, president of Mexico's National Sugar and Alcohol Chamber, after a meeting with the trade ministry last week.
FOOD
April 16, 1987 | Associated Press
The secret of how the fruit got inside the liquid-filled, chocolate-covered cherries is almost as much of a mystery as how the ship got inside the bottle. The process by which these unique candies are created relies on a chemical reaction that actually takes place after the candy is made, says Dr. David Chisdes, an American Chemical Society member affiliated with a major candy company.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For parents looking to sneak some nutrition into their kids' school lunches, brightly packaged fruity snacks — many of which promise they're the equivalent of a serving of fruit or more — are undoubtedly tempting. After all, the plastic-wrapped bars, sticks, rolls and strips contain no pits, seeds or cores and require no washing, peeling or slicing. And kids tend to eat them without any fuss. But convenience aside, parents shouldn't kid themselves. "They're not as good as eating regular fruit," no matter the promises on the package, says Mark Kantor, professor of nutrition and food science at the University of Maryland in College Park.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Lucas Cruikshank and his hyperactive Fred character had millions of YouTube fans and a line of merchandise when Hollywood came calling. Then a manager from the Collective pitched the Nebraska teenager a vision for his squeaky-voiced character that would result, three years later, in a holiday album, three made-for-TV movies, and a series on Nickelodeon. "So many people in the industry didn't know if you could take something on the Internet and cross it over to mainstream TV and movies," said Cruikshank, now 18. "It felt really good to prove them wrong.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc. and two other makers of corn sweeteners must face a trial over claims that they colluded to fix prices, after a federal appeals court revived a 7-year-old case that had been dismissed in August. PepsiCo Inc., Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food and beverage companies had sued the sweetener producers, saying that in 1988 they colluded to fix the price of high-fructose corn syrup. Executives at Archer Daniels and Wayzata, Minn.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge said he intends to dismiss a class-action lawsuit alleging that Archer Daniels Midland Co., Cargill Inc., Tate & Lyle and Cerestar fix prices in the $2-billion market for high-fructose corn syrup. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Mihm told lawyers in a conference call Wednesday that he plans to dismiss the lawsuit filed in September 1995 by PepsiCo Inc., the Coca-Cola Co. and 24 other food companies.
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