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BUSINESS
March 7, 2006 | From Reuters
Mexico lost its appeal against a World Trade Organization ruling that its system of taxes on soft drinks sweetened with anything other than cane sugar syrup violated trade rules. The WTO's appeals panel upheld the findings of a trade panel backing the United States, which argued that the system, including a distribution tax, discriminated against other sweeteners such as beet sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
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NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
We've been checking out the many energy and snack bars on the market, and it seems there are plenty of choices for people who need or want to avoid gluten. Some of them announce it on the front of the label; others require closer reading of the nutrition information. For people who don't eat gluten by choice, there are lots of bars that don't include wheat, rye or barley as an ingredient but warn the bars are made in facilities that might house those products. That's important information for people with celiac disease -- even a small bit of gluten can make them sick.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | Reuters
Mexico has given the United States until today to accept imports of its surplus sugar or it would take the dispute before a North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration panel, a sugar official said. "If the American proposals . . . are not satisfactory, . . . we will request an arbitration panel," said Carlos Seoane, president of Mexico's National Sugar and Alcohol Chamber, after a meeting with the trade ministry last week.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
In the war against pests, the lowly cockroach makes for a fearsome adversary. It can go weeks without water, survive decapitation for a time - and, like any proper super-villain, can send humans screaming from a room. Now researchers have discovered how some roaches have eluded humans' once-infallible traps: They have evolved so that glucose-sweetened bait tastes bitter. The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, solves a 20-year mystery and sheds light on the cockroach's powerful ability to adapt.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, This post has been corrected, as noted below
Honeybees that live off the same sweetener found in soft drinks could be more vulnerable to the microbial enemies and pesticides believed to be linked to catastrophic collapse of honeybee colonies worldwide, a new study suggests. Researchers identified a compound found in the wall of plant pollen that appears to activate the genes that help metabolize toxins, including pesticides, according to the study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science. Although pollen winds up in the honey produced by Apis mellifera , these bees used to pollinate crops spend more time sipping on the same sugar substitute that is ubiquitous in processed foods - high-fructose corn syrup.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter
Are farm subsidies making us fat? Billions in taxpayer dollars are going to support high fructose corn syrup and three other common food additives used in junk food, according to a report released this week by the California Public Interest Research Group and the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, both consumer advocacy groups. The report, "Apples to Twinkies: Comparing Federal Subsidies of Fresh Produce and Junk Food," makes the case that federal farm subsidies are helping feed the nation's obesity epidemic.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Knowing what ingredients are in the foods we buy and eat is important – even when you’re in a rush at the market. Here's a cellphone app that might help, and it's free. Fooducate , a website dedicated to helping all of us to eat a little healthier, has launched a new iPhone app that allows you to scan or type in a bar code and receive an overall grade rating for a product. The grade is based on certain "bad" ingredients -- too much sugar and salt, too many additives, too much high-fructose corn syrup, etc. (Download from the iTunes App Store.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | David Lazarus
Let's call it what it is: a sin tax. A California lawmaker is targeting the obesity epidemic with a tax that would slap a penny-an-ounce levy on drinks sweetened with sugar or corn syrup. The food industry, not surprisingly, has squared off against the idea, arguing that the tax bill is a punitive assault on personal choice. "The government doesn't have the right to social engineer," said J. Justin Wilson, senior research analyst at the industry-backed Center for Consumer Freedom.
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