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Fruit Trees

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MAGAZINE
January 25, 1987 | GEORGE HARMON SCOTT and BILL SIDNAM
Flowering peach, nectarine and apricot trees are grown for their springtime blossoms, not for fruit. 'Alma Stultz,' for example, is a flowering nectarine, sterile but with large, pink, showy flowers. Prune flowering fruit trees after they bloom, not now. However, do cut back fruit-bearing trees this month or next. Make clean cuts that are flush with the trunk; stubs may rot and provide access for insects and diseases. Prune roses before new growth starts.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
This Napa farmhouse-style home, which takes its cues from 19th-century floor plans, sits on a corner lot in the Manhattan Beach Tree Section. White bead board brings a rural tone to the interiors as does the country kitchen's butcher-block counters and farmhouse sink. Location: 743 29th St., Manhattan Beach 90266 Asking price: $4.2 million Year built: 2013 House size: Five bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 3,800 square feet Lot size: 8,382 square feet Features: Wraparound front porch, wood-burning stove, breakfast sun room, radiant floor heating, basement family room, covered porch, brick patio and paths, detached three-car garage, fruit trees, fenced raised-bed vegetable garden, flower gardens About the area: Last year, 398 single-family homes sold in the 90266 ZIP Code at a median price of $1.65 million, according to DataQuick.
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MAGAZINE
March 1, 1987 | GEORGE HARMON SCOTT and BILL SIDNAM
Fruit trees are flowering, or will soon, and if you are able to fertilize only once a year, now is the time to do it. Any granular fertilizer will do. First, determine how many square feet are under the tree's foliage canopy, and use the amount recommended on the package label. Scatter the fertilizer under the tree, making sure that you distribute it evenly, and then work it into the soil by roughing up the ground with a steel rake.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Beau Bridges and his wife, Wendy, have sold their home in gated Hidden Hills for $2.4 million - twice what they originally paid. The sale was a while in the making, however. They first listed the country English-style house for sale in 2010 at $3.25 million and later turned to leasing. Designed by architect Marshall Lewis and built in 1976, the ivy-covered house has a sunken den with a fireplace, a bar, a family room, a billiard area, an office, an ample wine cellar, a sauna, six bedrooms and six bathrooms in about 6,800 square feet of living space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Del Aire residents got to enjoy the fruits of their labor Saturday with the unveiling of the state's first public orchard. Residents of this quiet, unincorporated slice of Los Angeles County had helped plant 27 fruit trees and eight grapevines in Del Aire Park and 60 additional fruit trees in the surrounding neighborhood. It was part of a larger renovation that included face lifts for a community center, basketball court and baseball field, all nestled in a green space just southwest of the juncture of the 105 and 405 freeways.
NEWS
July 28, 1985
Let me tell you how much I enjoyed your magazine article on exotic fruits (Citrus: The Right Tree Can Deliver a Big Crop in a Small Space, June 23). I am going to purchase several trees this afternoon. I appreciate the descriptions and the concise, easy-to-follow planting instructions in your articles. I would like to see more articles on fruit trees. Joanne Pierce Rancho Mirage
REAL ESTATE
October 16, 1994 | JACK E. CHRISTENSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
a peach, a plum and a nectarine (all big and mature)--were beautiful and full of fruit last year, but this year major branches have died back, and the bark on the upper surface of these branches is brittle and falling off. There is also some jelly-like material oozing out of the bark in spots on live branches. What happened, and can I save my trees?
REAL ESTATE
June 9, 1991 | BILL SIDNAM, Sidnam has written garden columns and features for The Times since 1975.
Most of us probably don't mind sharing some of the fruit from our home orchards with our resident bird friends. But it becomes enraging when a flock of greedy, feathered gourmets clean our trees completely of the fresh fruit that we've been eagerly anticipating. If you have a bird problem in your home fruit orchard or vegetable garden, there's a new product that can help you humanely and inexpensively control the problem.
HOME & GARDEN
April 10, 1999 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Start training fruit trees as soon as they are in the ground. Proper training keeps branches bathed in needed sunlight and builds strength to eventually hold the luscious bounty. Train a fruit tree either to a central leader form or a vase form. The central leader form is like a Christmas tree, with a single main trunk off which grow successively smaller branches. This form suits apple, pear and sweet cherry.
HOME & GARDEN
June 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
The time to start training any fruit tree is just as soon as you put it in the ground. Proper training is needed for strong limbs that will not break when they are eventually weighted down with fruit. Proper training also shapes the young tree to a form that keeps all the branches bathed in sunlight, even as the tree ages. Train a fruit tree either to a "central-leader" shape or a "vase" shape.
HOME & GARDEN
January 25, 2014 | Anne Colby
Certified arborist Rick Wheeler stands beneath a persimmon tree in a Torrance backyard and surveys the bare branches. Then he raises his shears and carefully starts snipping. He spots a crossing branch. "We'll get rid of that," he says. Then he lops off another branch. "That one's getting a bit too long in the tooth. " This is a favorite time of year for the owner of Island Mountain Tree & Plant Services, his grandson, general manager Peter Bernal, and their small crew. It's prime time for pruning deciduous fruit and ornamental trees, and they are busy visiting yards in Southern California to get dormant trees in shape.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
A couple of years ago, when Steve Jobs appeared before the Cupertino, Calif., City Council to discuss Apple's proposed new campus, he mentioned that the company had even hired a "senior arborist" from Stanford .  Since then, the identity of that arborist has remained a mystery. But no more.  Meet Dave Muffly, Apple's arborist and tree whisperer.  Muffly is a well-known figure in the Silicon Valley tree community. Several folks I contacted were surprised that his identity had remained a secret for so long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Rosanna Xia
The aroma of trash and leftover people food proved too alluring Wednesday for a bear in Sun Valley, where police and wildlife officials tracked the animal through a residential neighborhood. “The smells are what bring them there,” Andrew Hughan, spokesman for the California Department Fish and Wildlife told KTLA-TV during an interview. “It's all about the food.” The bear appeared to be about 15 months old and had a tag on its ear, meaning it has been trapped before, Hughan said.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Soap star Drake Hogestyn is ready to sell the Malibu retreat where he has no doubt spent many days of his life. It is up for sale at $4.995 million. The Tuscan-style two-story, built in 2002, features wood-beam ceilings, French doors, hardwood floors, decks and balconies. There are fireplaces in the living room, family room and master suite of the 6,616-square-foot house, which has a total of five bedrooms and 7.5 bathrooms. The grounds of about an acre include a circular driveway, a swimming pool, sycamore trees, fruit trees and an herb garden.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Whenever I head to Good Girl Dinette for a hot bowl of pho, I like to sit directly across from a large oil painting of a beautifully depicted delicata squash that hangs alone on one of the restaurant's walls. A Highland Park local, Timothy Sellers, painted this rendition of the yellow-and-green-striped squash. His vegetable portraits inspired by his garden, fruit trees planted over a dozen years ago at his Highland Park home and the local farmers market, can also be found on view at Folliero's Pizza and exhibited occasionally at Future Studio . When Sellers is not painting portraits of tomatoes or mushrooms, he's making music with his band, fittingly named Artichoke . One of the band's songs.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Faye Resnick of "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" has purchased a home in the Hollywood Hills for $1.605 million. The traditional-style house is surrounded by mature landscaping and sits on slightly more than half an acre with fruit trees, patios and a swimming pool. Features include an open floor plan, with hardwood floors, a living room fireplace and a wall of French doors in the dining room that open to a balcony with treetop views. There are three bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and 2,567 square feet of living space.
NEWS
August 15, 1986 | KAREN LAVIOLA, Karen Laviola
Two latter-day Johnny Appleseeds returned to Los Angeles last week from a three-month trip to Africa where they planted 5,000 fruit trees in five countries. The project, sponsored by TreePeople, involved a chain of volunteers and donations from growers, manufacturers and airlines to provide villages, schools and individual homes with trees.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
The Japanese apricot -- a plant native to China, actually -- is one of the longest lived of the flowering fruit trees. It's a symbol of resilience in the face of adversity thanks to its early flowers, delicate promises of spring that can begin blossoming before New Year's Day. The tree continues to send out white, rose or red flowers on nearly leafless branches, luring bees all through the winter. And then there is the fruit. Golf-ball sized orbs begin to appear in spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Del Aire residents got to enjoy the fruits of their labor Saturday with the unveiling of the state's first public orchard. Residents of this quiet, unincorporated slice of Los Angeles County had helped plant 27 fruit trees and eight grapevines in Del Aire Park and 60 additional fruit trees in the surrounding neighborhood. It was part of a larger renovation that included face lifts for a community center, basketball court and baseball field, all nestled in a green space just southwest of the juncture of the 105 and 405 freeways.
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