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Fruit Trees

REAL ESTATE
February 23, 1997 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
QUESTION: I cannot get a straight answer from any nurseryman as to the value of composted steer manure as a mulch or a soil amendment. Aware of its high salt content, I have soaked it in a bottomless trash can before use, or rototilled it directly into the soil. Am I inviting eventual problems? --J.L., Orange ANSWER: You are right about the high salt content.
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NEWS
July 18, 2002
Citrus needs to be watered more often than other fruit trees because of the relatively shallow roots, but don't overdo it. Evenly spaced irrigations are the key to preventing fruit drop and splitting. A good soaking every two weeks is often recommended in summer. Leaves yellowing between the veins in summer are a sign of chlorosis. Cure by fertilizing with trace elements such as iron or zinc, available at nurseries. Most plants don't need fertilizing in summer.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Soap star Drake Hogestyn is ready to sell the Malibu retreat where he has no doubt spent many days of his life. It is up for sale at $4.995 million. The Tuscan-style two-story, built in 2002, features wood-beam ceilings, French doors, hardwood floors, decks and balconies. There are fireplaces in the living room, family room and master suite of the 6,616-square-foot house, which has a total of five bedrooms and 7.5 bathrooms. The grounds of about an acre include a circular driveway, a swimming pool, sycamore trees, fruit trees and an herb garden.
REAL ESTATE
March 24, 1991 | BILL SIDNAM, Sidnam has written garden columns and features for The Times since 1975
According to Roger Meyer, a nursery owner who specializes in subtropical fruit trees and plants, the jujube (pronounced ju-JU-bee) is a tree for all reasons. Consider its attributes: The jujube is a handsome tree, it bears copious quantities of delicious fruit and it thrives in most landscaping situations, even on lawns, with very little care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996
A serene 10-acre retreat, set down like a paradox in the middle of Encino in a well-to-do-neighborhood. The grounds are lush with oaks and pines, roses and birds of paradise, fruit trees and isolated garden paths and duck pond.
FOOD
March 10, 2011 | By Veronique de Turenne, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes, the peach on a backyard tree is just a peach, a sweet, home-grown bonus. In certain circles of Altadena, though, that peach is a gateway fruit. One tree becomes three, which becomes an orchard. The quest for organic fertilizer leads to a flock of chickens, which beget a garden. Before you know it, there's a herd of goats out front, heritage turkeys in back, a beehive, a rabbit hutch and a guard llama. This isn't just growing your own, a few clay pots on a condo balcony, say, or a tomato patch next to the rose bed. It's full-on urban homesteading, people raising fruit, produce and livestock in the city, and nowhere in Southern California has it taken off like in Altadena.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | ROBERT SMAUS
Things to do this week: Plant bare root vegetables. Roots of artichoke, asparagus and rhubarb are at nurseries this month, and it's an inexpensive way to plant them. You'll also find transplants of many winter vegetables, such as broccoli and lettuce, plus bulbs of garlic, onion and shallots. This is not a good month to sow seed in the garden because the chilly nights make germination difficult. Spray fruit trees again. Spray deciduous fruit trees--peaches in particular--for the second time this winter.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | ROBERT SMAUS
Things to do this week: * Plant bare root vegetables. Roots of artichoke, asparagus and rhubarb are at nurseries this month, and it's an inexpensive way to plant them. You'll also find transplants of many winter vegetables, such as broccoli and lettuce, plus bulbs of garlic, onion and shallots. This is not a good month to sow seed in the garden because the chilly nights make germination difficult. * Spray fruit trees again.
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