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Fruits

FOOD
May 28, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Growing cherries is always a roll of the dice for farmers, because if rain falls when the fruits are ripe on the tree, a large portion of them can split and be ruined. You'd think that by late May the main danger would have passed, but J.P. Barbagelata, who is hoping to bring Bings to the Santa Monica market next Wednesday, had the agonizing experience of driving off last Tuesday just as the rain was starting to fall on his farm in Linden, near Stockton. As he drove he heard that a quarter-inch had fallen, and that more was expected.
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FOOD
July 14, 1994
Many thanks for your article "The Fruits of Home" (June 23). I've been dying for a taste of salak ever since I last visited Indonesia. But how, oh how, could you do an entire article on tropical fruits and not mention mangosteen, the most wonderful tropical fruit of all? And it's available in Mexico. I am mystified. --DIANA K. BRITT Pasadena
OPINION
December 5, 2003
"World Sneezes; U.S. Diners Get Sick" (Opinion, Nov. 30) grossly exaggerated the public health concern associated with consuming fresh fruits and vegetables based on an isolated, rare outbreak linked to only one small produce commodity. We understand the need to educate consumers about the current hepatitis outbreak, but Madeline Drexler's comments about the safety of fresh produce and of possible sources of contamination were irresponsible. Her piece actually poses greater danger to most people's health by deterring them from consuming at least five servings of fresh fruits and vegetables a day, the No. 1 public health message of federal health authorities today.
FOOD
January 25, 2013 | By David Karp
Midwinter is peak time for citrus to be eaten fresh, and this year quality has been superb, probably because of the extended heat earlier in the growing season. Here are tips about which varieties to look for now and from which growing areas, including recommended growers, tips for choosing and using, and potential pitfalls. For each type there's also a peek at what the future has to offer. Algerian and some other clementines (from Southern California): At its best, sweet, juicy, rich-flavored, easy to peel and seedless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh
Karen Segura dug her hands deep into the soil of an onion patch at Bell Gardens Intermediate School as cars zipped past the nearly empty schoolyard. The 14-year-old was busy uprooting weeds in the school's edible garden, while around her five other students watered, tilled and pruned a lush assortment of fruits and vegetables. There were tomatoes, avocados, apples, pineapples, pumpkins, zucchinis, lavender, lettuce, Swiss chard and artichokes. Every public school in Bell Gardens has just such an urban farm run by members of the Environmental Garden Club, an after-school program that started at the intermediate school and now includes a rotating roster of 8- to 18-year-olds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
California researchers have isolated a gene that plays a key role in the ripening process of fruits and vegetables. The discovery could lead to new ways to reduce spoilage of the crops, and thus to get fresher produce to customers. In the United States, almost 50% of fruits and vegetables are eventually lost as a result of spoilage caused by premature ripening, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
HEALTH
January 22, 2001
Some thoughts came to mind when reading the article about the supposed news that dark vegetables and fruits do not contain as much vitamin A as previously believed ("Eating Enough Dark Veggies?," Jan. 15). How many decades have we been tampering with and depleting the soil content as well as the plants themselves with fertilizers, pesticides and so on? Now we are treating seeds with growth hormones, picking the vegetables or fruits when they are so far from ripe that they rarely even resemble what they are supposed to look like in their mature color.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Half of physician Mimi Choi's pediatric patients are overweight or obese. She instructs them to eat more fruits and vegetables. Now she can go one step further - refer them to a discounted produce stand steps away from the South Los Angeles health center where she works. Choi said she can talk about better nutrition until she is "blue in the face," but her patients will eat more fresh food only if it's available and affordable. "One of the biggest issues is access," she said.
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