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Fruits

FOOD
March 1, 2013 | By David Karp
- The cherimoya is a peculiar-looking, almost intimidating fruit - "like a pre-Columbian jade pine cone or the finial for a giant Inca four-poster bed," in Elizabeth Schneider's memorable words. But at its best it tastes sublime, with sweet, juicy, flan-like flesh and rich flavor blending papaya, banana and pineapple. Mark Twain famously called it "the most delicious fruit known to men," and if taste were all that counted, cherimoyas might outsell apples. Alas, cherimoyas are exceptionally tricky to grow, select and ripen, and thus not well adapted to American industrial fruticulture and marketing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Half of physician Mimi Choi's pediatric patients are overweight or obese. She instructs them to eat more fruits and vegetables. Now she can go one step further - refer them to a discounted produce stand steps away from the South Los Angeles health center where she works. Choi said she can talk about better nutrition until she is "blue in the face," but her patients will eat more fresh food only if it's available and affordable. "One of the biggest issues is access," she said.
OPINION
December 5, 2003
"World Sneezes; U.S. Diners Get Sick" (Opinion, Nov. 30) grossly exaggerated the public health concern associated with consuming fresh fruits and vegetables based on an isolated, rare outbreak linked to only one small produce commodity. We understand the need to educate consumers about the current hepatitis outbreak, but Madeline Drexler's comments about the safety of fresh produce and of possible sources of contamination were irresponsible. Her piece actually poses greater danger to most people's health by deterring them from consuming at least five servings of fresh fruits and vegetables a day, the No. 1 public health message of federal health authorities today.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
WEST, Texas - Most every small town in America has a local eatery that embodies its heart and soul - not to mention its stomach - a place where workers know the first names and the orders of customers by heart. In this tiny community of 2,800, devastated by an explosion at a fertilizer factory that left scores injured and a yet-untold number dead, the Czech Stop is the place where locals and passers-through stop for the meat and fruit kolaches, (pronounced koh-law-chee,) a taste of the town's Central European roots.
FOOD
January 25, 2013 | By David Karp
Midwinter is peak time for citrus to be eaten fresh, and this year quality has been superb, probably because of the extended heat earlier in the growing season. Here are tips about which varieties to look for now and from which growing areas, including recommended growers, tips for choosing and using, and potential pitfalls. For each type there's also a peek at what the future has to offer. Algerian and some other clementines (from Southern California): At its best, sweet, juicy, rich-flavored, easy to peel and seedless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh
Karen Segura dug her hands deep into the soil of an onion patch at Bell Gardens Intermediate School as cars zipped past the nearly empty schoolyard. The 14-year-old was busy uprooting weeds in the school's edible garden, while around her five other students watered, tilled and pruned a lush assortment of fruits and vegetables. There were tomatoes, avocados, apples, pineapples, pumpkins, zucchinis, lavender, lettuce, Swiss chard and artichokes. Every public school in Bell Gardens has just such an urban farm run by members of the Environmental Garden Club, an after-school program that started at the intermediate school and now includes a rotating roster of 8- to 18-year-olds.
FOOD
August 26, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The word "heirloom" is commonly applied to the produce sold at farmers markets, but the concepts behind it frequently are misunderstood or stretched, both by growers and the public. Originally the word was a legal term referring to goods that descended to an heir along with real property; by extension, it came to refer to something of special value handed down from one generation to another. In a horticultural context, the Oxford English Dictionary defines "heirloom" as "a variety of plant or breed of animal which is distinct from the more common varieties associated with commercial agriculture, and has been cultivated or reared using the same traditional methods for a long time, typically on a small scale and often within a particular region or family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
California researchers have isolated a gene that plays a key role in the ripening process of fruits and vegetables. The discovery could lead to new ways to reduce spoilage of the crops, and thus to get fresher produce to customers. In the United States, almost 50% of fruits and vegetables are eventually lost as a result of spoilage caused by premature ripening, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
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