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Fruits

FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By David Karp
Rhubarb is one of the great joys of spring, with its rosy color, earthy tang and old-fashioned allure, and the story of its local rise and fall is as intriguing as its flavor. Just a generation or two ago, it was widely cultivated in Southern California, but now local rhubarb is available almost exclusively at farmers markets, and just from a handful of vendors. Rhubarb is native to central and northern Asia, where its roots were harvested for millenniums for their medicinal properties.
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NATIONAL
April 19, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
WEST, Texas - Most every small town in America has a local eatery that embodies its heart and soul - not to mention its stomach - a place where workers know the first names and the orders of customers by heart. In this tiny community of 2,800, devastated by an explosion at a fertilizer factory that left scores injured and a yet-untold number dead, the Czech Stop is the place where locals and passers-through stop for the meat and fruit kolaches, (pronounced koh-law-chee,) a taste of the town's Central European roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh
Karen Segura dug her hands deep into the soil of an onion patch at Bell Gardens Intermediate School as cars zipped past the nearly empty schoolyard. The 14-year-old was busy uprooting weeds in the school's edible garden, while around her five other students watered, tilled and pruned a lush assortment of fruits and vegetables. There were tomatoes, avocados, apples, pineapples, pumpkins, zucchinis, lavender, lettuce, Swiss chard and artichokes. Every public school in Bell Gardens has just such an urban farm run by members of the Environmental Garden Club, an after-school program that started at the intermediate school and now includes a rotating roster of 8- to 18-year-olds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Half of physician Mimi Choi's pediatric patients are overweight or obese. She instructs them to eat more fruits and vegetables. Now she can go one step further - refer them to a discounted produce stand steps away from the South Los Angeles health center where she works. Choi said she can talk about better nutrition until she is "blue in the face," but her patients will eat more fresh food only if it's available and affordable. "One of the biggest issues is access," she said.
FOOD
July 14, 1994
Many thanks for your article "The Fruits of Home" (June 23). I've been dying for a taste of salak ever since I last visited Indonesia. But how, oh how, could you do an entire article on tropical fruits and not mention mangosteen, the most wonderful tropical fruit of all? And it's available in Mexico. I am mystified. --DIANA K. BRITT Pasadena
FOOD
August 25, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The most distinctive and enigmatic stone fruit in markets currently is the Indian Blood Freestone peach. The first thing you'll note is its intense rose-like aroma, which can fill a room with peachy perfume. The fruits look like nothing else, with thick white fuzz over mottled red and creamy white skin, which can give them an odd gray-green cast; the flesh is snowy white with blotches of red — occasionally it can be spectacularly, fully red, almost like a beet. When really ripe — look for specimens that are plump and rounded near the stem end, with a vibrant cream background color — they've got a great balance of sweetness and acidity, and a unique berrylike or vinous flavor.
FOOD
February 5, 2010 | By David Karp
The Santa Monica Saturday Organic farmers market was originally conceived in 1991 as an all-organic venue, but when this proved impractical, nonorganic vendors were admitted. Nevertheless, it does offer a high percentage of organic vendors, currently about 20 of 46, and more important, it's one of the best markets in the Southland, in good part because Mort Bernstein, the manager since soon after its founding, is a stickler for integrity and quality. Laura Ramirez, who drolly calls her Redlands-based farm J.J.'s Lone Daughter Ranch, brings superb avocados, keeps customers informed about the seasonal progression of varieties, and expertly picks out fruits to the desired ripeness.
OPINION
December 5, 2003
"World Sneezes; U.S. Diners Get Sick" (Opinion, Nov. 30) grossly exaggerated the public health concern associated with consuming fresh fruits and vegetables based on an isolated, rare outbreak linked to only one small produce commodity. We understand the need to educate consumers about the current hepatitis outbreak, but Madeline Drexler's comments about the safety of fresh produce and of possible sources of contamination were irresponsible. Her piece actually poses greater danger to most people's health by deterring them from consuming at least five servings of fresh fruits and vegetables a day, the No. 1 public health message of federal health authorities today.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
School-based efforts to get kids to eat more fruits and vegetables are not failing, but they're no wild success either, according to an analysis of programs involving almost 26,400 children. The kids ate a quarter portion more a day of produce - and if you just looked at vegetables alone, the increase was just under a tenth of a portion, according to the analysis of 27 programs published in the October issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. So one sweet potato, or one cup of broccoli, would represent the increase for about 10 kids.
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