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Fuel Additives

NEWS
July 19, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California officials suffered a setback in Congress on Wednesday in their effort to keep the state from having to add ethanol to gasoline, a requirement that state officials warn could lead to price spikes and supply shortages. The House Energy and Commerce Committee rejected a proposal by California lawmakers to allow states to sell gasoline without ethanol so long as it meets anti-pollution rules.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 2003 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to derail proposed federal legislation that would boost the use of ethanol in gasoline, a California congressman and others on Wednesday said the additive helped trigger price increases in the spring and has worsened the state's gasoline supply troubles. "The lessons learned in California may very well be relevant nationwide," said Rep. Doug Ose (R-Sacramento), who presided over a House subcommittee hearing in Diamond Bar to discuss California's move to ethanol-blended gasoline.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress looks for ways to simplify a national patchwork of conflicting gasoline formulas, key interest groups are proposing a compromise that could reconcile the interests of California motorists and Corn Belt ethanol producers. Under the deal they are advocating, Congress would pass legislation mandating the use of ethanol as a gasoline additive to improve air quality nationwide.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2009 | Associated Press
The increased use of ethanol could cost the government up to $900 million for food stamps and child nutrition programs, a congressional report says. Higher use of the corn-based fuel additive accounted for about 10% to 15% of the rise in food prices from April 2007 to April 2008, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. That translates into higher costs for food programs for the needy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1997
"Stealth Lobby Drives Fuel Additive War" (June 16) mischaracterizes my commitment to protecting the health of the unsuspecting public from the dangers of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A jury found that Mobil Oil Corp. wrongfully dismissed me in a groundbreaking whistle-blowing case when I disclosed that Mobil was marketing gasoline that contained illegally and dangerously high quantities of benzene in Japan. The appellate court upheld the jury decision against Mobil, which awarded me large compensatory and punitive damages.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tosco Corp. said Wednesday that it is experimenting with selling gasoline that does not contain the controversial additive MTBE at 50 of its 76-brand service stations in Northern California. The gasoline that Tosco will be selling at the stations in Contra Costa, Marin and Sonoma counties will comply with all California and federal standards, Tosco spokesman David Kory said. "This gasoline is completely legal," Kory said. "We're trying to demonstrate that solutions to MTBE gasoline are possible."
NEWS
August 20, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The factory yard smells like fresh beer and burned toast. There's a constant thrum and clatter. Giant machines are crushing corn, stirring mash, fermenting a goopy syrup into pure grain alcohol. The final product streams out of a tap, crisp and clear, with an odor sharp as a paper cut. It's ethanol, a fuel made from corn. A fuel that folks in the heartland are counting on to bail out rural America--if only California would quit being so pigheaded and agree to buy it. But California isn't biting.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2005 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
In a bid to remove the chief stumbling block to long-debated energy legislation, House Republicans on Friday proposed creating a multibillion-dollar fund to pay for cleaning water supplies fouled by a gasoline additive. The cost would be shared by the oil industry and federal and state governments.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
A sweeping energy bill coming before Congress this week would not only limit the liability of manufacturers of a gasoline additive blamed for fouling water supplies from California to New Hampshire but would also give the companies up to $2 billion in federal aid, according to details of the Republican-drafted bill released Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002 | DAN MORAIN and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Gray Davis' announcement Thursday that he may delay banning the pollutant MTBE from gasoline reflects an election year gamble that it is better to risk the ire of environmentalists than a big run-up in gasoline prices. More specifically, Davis is trying to avert a second energy crisis--one that could hit late this year, about the time voters decide whether to give the Democratic governor a second term.
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