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Fuel Additives

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002 | DAN MORAIN and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Gray Davis' announcement Thursday that he may delay banning the pollutant MTBE from gasoline reflects an election year gamble that it is better to risk the ire of environmentalists than a big run-up in gasoline prices. More specifically, Davis is trying to avert a second energy crisis--one that could hit late this year, about the time voters decide whether to give the Democratic governor a second term.
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BUSINESS
May 3, 2002 | From Reuters
BP, the largest gasoline supplier in California, said Thursday that it will switch federally mandated fuel additives in the largest U.S. gasoline market in a move industry experts have said could tighten supplies and hike pump prices. BP said it would phase out cleaner-burning fuel additive MTBE, or methyl tertiary butyl ether, in California gasoline by Dec. 31, and has begun to sign contracts with several suppliers of the alternative gasoline additive, ethanol. Gov.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
When the manufacturers of a gasoline additive blamed for fouling water supplies across the country were hit with lawsuits, they did what a growing number of businesses are doing: They sought protection from Congress. A little-noticed measure, approved by the House last month as part of an energy policy bill, would limit the liability the producers of the fuel additive MTBE would face for groundwater contamination.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's Environmental Protection Agency ruling that probably will require the use of ethanol in California's reformulated gasoline could give a huge boost to several projects in the state that seek to produce the fuel additive from crops such as sugar cane and corn, and agricultural waste such as rice straw, forest thinnings and orchard prunings.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists and state officials scored a major victory Tuesday when Methanex Corp. of Canada announced it had lost its $970-million trade case challenging California's 1999 ban of the controversial gasoline additive MTBE. The case was viewed as a crucial test of state governments' ability to enforce health and environmental regulations that might conflict with international trade pacts. It was the first time a foreign firm had used the North American Free Trade Agreement to challenge a U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2000 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Navy began a chemical cleanup Friday that it hopes will eventually lead to a blueprint for other communities across the nation to follow when removing the contaminant MTBE from water sources. The Naval Construction Battalion Center is a test site for various methods of controlling the fast-moving pollutant that was intended to help fuel burn cleaner but has also dirtied ground water.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2005 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
In a bid to remove the chief stumbling block to long-debated energy legislation, House Republicans on Friday proposed creating a multibillion-dollar fund to pay for cleaning water supplies fouled by a gasoline additive. The cost would be shared by the oil industry and federal and state governments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gasoline additive that may cause cancer has had far less impact on the state's drinking-water supply than expected, and replacing it will drive gasoline prices up to $1 billion more than Gov. Gray Davis expected when he banned it, according to a California Energy Commission analyst. Still, analyst Gordon Schremp and other state officials said they support Davis' decision to phase out MTBE, or methyl tertiary-butyl ether, by the end of 2003. "MTBE needs to go. Period," said William L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Faced with increasing evidence of drinking water pollution in California from a common fuel additive, state and federal regulators are struggling to curb the ill effects of a chemical they consider an overall plus for the environment. On Tuesday, the city of Santa Monica filed suit against Mobil Oil Corp., blaming leaks at a Mobil-owned gas station for contaminating water in city wells with the heavily used additive, known as MTBE.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cruel twist in the battle to clean the environment, promoters of MTBE, a major additive in what officials call California's cleaner burning gasoline, are finding that the ingredient itself is on trial. Clean air experts are convinced that reformulated gasoline containing the additive has brought about significant smog reductions in the state with the nation's worst air quality. But it may be a carcinogen, and it threatens to foul drinking water.
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