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Fuel Economy Standards

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NEWS
February 28, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration today will announce that it opposes a Democratic proposal to require dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency for cars and trucks sold in the U.S., a move sharpening the partisan divide over energy policy. While the Democratic plan would mandate specific fuel economy increases over the next decade, the White House will urge that Congress instead authorize the Department of Transportation to set the standards later on, according to a senior White House official.
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OPINION
August 29, 2012
There's nothing really new about the federal fuel economy standards that were finalized Tuesday - they were announced more than a year ago and have changed little since - but now that we're on the verge of a presidential election, they're generating more political heat. "Gov. Romney opposes the extreme standards that President Obama has imposed, which will limit choices for American families," said Romney campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul. "The president tells voters that his regulations will save them thousands of dollars at the pump, but always forgets to mention that the savings will be wiped out by having to pay thousands of dollars more upfront.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
On an August morning in 2008, a handful of executives from the country's top car companies, several environmentalists and two of California's most powerful pollution regulators met in a windowless conference room in a hotel next to Los Angeles International Airport. For 30 years, the car companies had been locked in battle with California and environmentalists over increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and cutting air pollution. But that meeting at the Radisson Hotel brought together new government and industry leaders able to capitalize on new technologies in a market ready to adopt fundamental changes in cars.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration on Tuesday announced the final version of proposed landmark fuel-economy standards that would almost double the average gas mileage for each automaker's passenger vehicle fleet to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. Initially proposed a year ago, the final rules mark the latest step in a lengthy campaign by the administration to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and oil consumption. They build on the administration's ambitious standards that raise the average to 35.5 mpg over five years, ending with the 2016 model year.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2006 | From Reuters
The Bush administration is expected to announce today a modest rise in fuel economy standards for light trucks that industry experts say will not hurt struggling U.S. automakers that produce the least efficient models of popular sport utility vehicles and pickups. Transportation planners believe that changes to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards through 2011 will save billions of gallons of gasoline and address President Bush's call for consumers to be more energy efficient.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | United Press International
The Transportation Department, responding to pleas from Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp., today eased federal fuel economy standards for the 1989 model year to 26.5 miles per gallon. The controversial decision, certain to raise the ire of environmentalists, is intended to "enhance U.S. global competitiveness and protect jobs in the automotive sector of the U.S. economy," the department said. The 1989 standard would have been 27.
OPINION
May 10, 2008
Re "Smog of war," editorial, April 25 For more than three decades, the U.S. Department of Transportation has supported the need for a single, national set of fuel economy standards. This is consistent with congressional legislation that has repeatedly called for national fuel economy standards. There is no scientific way to regulate tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide without also setting fuel economy standards. As a result, inconsistent state efforts such as California's would undermine national fuel economy standards and significantly distort manufacturing and production decisions without assuring any additional fuel savings.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Ford Motor Co. said Monday that it will increase the number of foreign-built parts on its Grand Marquis and Crown Victoria large cars to classify them as imports, enabling Ford to more easily meet federal fuel economy standards. Ford also said it will raise the U.S. content of its Ford Probe and Mercury Tracer small cars as part of the same effort to meet Environmental Protection Agency mileage requirements. Under present fuel economy regulations, Ford faces tougher fuel economy standards for domestically produced cars than for models classified as imports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1985
Ford and GM call in their lawyers and lobbyists to lubricate and massage out a relaxation of fuel economy standards. At the same time, designers and engineers at other car makers show that the technology exists to meet 1986 model requirements. I think someone just spat in my eye, and I bet I am not the only American consumer to remember this cynicism when buying my next car. VERN STOLEN Pasadena
NEWS
December 22, 1986 | Associated Press
A task force on governmental regulations chaired by Vice President George Bush today proposed abolishing U.S. fuel economy standards, saying they are crimping the ability of domestic auto makers to respond to market demands. The Presidential Task Force on Regulatory Relief, re-established by President Reagan on Dec.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Average prices at U.S. gasoline pumps have been running ahead of the record pace set last year, but rising fuel economy standards have given American motorists many more choices for mitigating pain at the pump, the Natural Resources Defense Council said. The NRDC's new report on the subject is called "Relieving Pain at the Pump: Thanks to Stronger Standards, Consumers Have More Fuel-Efficient Choices. " In it, the , the NRDC pointed out, for example, that the number of subcompacts offering 30 miles per gallon or better fuel economy had tripled from just five in the 2009 model year to 15 in model year 2012.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
On an August morning in 2008, a handful of executives from the country's top car companies, several environmentalists and two of California's most powerful pollution regulators met in a windowless conference room in a hotel next to Los Angeles International Airport. For 30 years, the car companies had been locked in battle with California and environmentalists over increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and cutting air pollution. But that meeting at the Radisson Hotel brought together new government and industry leaders able to capitalize on new technologies in a market ready to adopt fundamental changes in cars.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
  The Obama administration has proposed landmark fuel economy standards that would almost double the average gas mileage for each automaker's passenger vehicle fleet to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The rules proposed Wednesday mark the latest step in a lengthy campaign to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and oil consumption. They would build on the administration's ambitious standards that raise the average to 35.5 mpg over five years ending with the 2016 model year. The latest standards would be phased in starting with the 2017 model year.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Set against the stalemate of the debt-ceiling debate, President Obama on Friday hailed agreement on an ambitious increase in auto fuel-economy standards as evidence that compromise and progress are still possible. The agreement, which Obama called "the single-most important step we've ever taken as a nation to reduce our dependence on foreign oil," was hammered out in weeks of negotiations involving automakers, environmentalists, unions, White House officials and the state of California.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Hyundai Motor America is adding to the plethora of monthly statistics it reports: the average mileage per gallon for the cars it has sold. That sales-weighted number serves as a yardstick for how close automakers are getting to the new fuel economy standard, which federal regulators have set at 34.1 miles per gallon for 2016 vehicles. The 2012 model year fleet requirement is 29.7 mpg. It's a slick marketing move that works to the advantage of the South Korean company and is unlikely to be adopted by other automakers, said Jessica Caldwell, an analyst with auto information company Edmunds.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
WASHINGTON -- With global talks on climate change looming, the Obama administration sought to gain momentum today by unveiling its plan to require better gas mileage for cars and trucks and tougher rules on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson released the proposed regulations at the White House, the follow-up to President Barack Obama's announcement in May that the government regulations would link emissions and fuel economy standards.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Chrysler Group announced measures to boost mileage for its cars and trucks. It said its new V-6 engines would be able to drop to three cylinders when less power was needed, raising fuel economy 6% to 8%. The Auburn Hills, Mich.-based company also plans to place its new two-mode hybrid powertrain in more vehicles, put a "clean" diesel engine in the 2009 Jeep Cherokee sport utility vehicle and alter its 5.7-liter Hemi and 4.7-liter V-8 engines for better gas mileage.
OPINION
May 10, 2008
Re "Smog of war," editorial, April 25 For more than three decades, the U.S. Department of Transportation has supported the need for a single, national set of fuel economy standards. This is consistent with congressional legislation that has repeatedly called for national fuel economy standards. There is no scientific way to regulate tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide without also setting fuel economy standards. As a result, inconsistent state efforts such as California's would undermine national fuel economy standards and significantly distort manufacturing and production decisions without assuring any additional fuel savings.
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