Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFuel Tanks
IN THE NEWS

Fuel Tanks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Judith Jelinek points down a row of buildings no more than 100 feet from three enormous fuel tanks used to gas up jet planes at John Wayne Airport. "We're at the end of the building, so we're not as affected as some of these here, but we're all affected," said Jelinek, who owns a business with her husband in the Irvine Center business park.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boeing is urging airlines to inspect the center fuel tanks on all 747 jumbo jets in service to look for potential sources of sparks as part of the investigation into the TWA Flight 800 explosion. All 230 people aboard were killed when the Paris-bound jet exploded off New York's Long Island last July 17. Investigators have not determined what caused the explosion, but theories include static electricity, faulty wiring or a spark in the center tank's fuel pump.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
The Center for Auto Safety alleges that General Motors has conducted a 20-year cover-up of a defect in its pickup truck fuel tanks that has caused 300 deaths in highway accidents. GM responds that the allegations are brought by private attorneys "trying to drum up business" and that its trucks' overall safety record is as good as those of Ford or Chrysler trucks. The controversy has raised troubling questions for the estimated 4.7 million owners of GM pickups produced between 1973 and 1987.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Aviation Administration on Thursday ordered airlines to keep some fuel in the center tanks of their Boeing 747 jumbo jets during normal operations because of sparks that could touch off an explosion when the tanks are dry. Citing similar concerns, the agency also ordered the airlines to stop using the tail fuel tanks of all 747 model 400 jetliners. FAA officials said the orders were prompted by evidence that worn pump shaft bearings could lead to chafing that would throw off sparks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five underground fuel tanks at the closed El Toro Marine Corps Air Station must be closed, upgraded or removed, county officials said Monday, or the Navy could face legal action. In a letter signed by Deputy Dist. Atty. Matthew I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
State water officials have given the city until Friday to come up with a plan to deal with possible contamination at the city maintenance yard on Basque Avenue and remove underground tanks at a former gas station on West Wilshire Boulevard. Underground fuel tanks at the Basque maintenance yard and contaminated soil have already been removed. Double-walled tanks have been put in, and several monitoring wells are to test for underground contamination.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2000 | Reuters
California environment officials are looking into whether oil company Atlantic Richfield Co. falsified public records to conceal that it had not done required safety improvements to its underground fuel storage tanks. The costly state-mandated upgrades were designed to prevent fuel leaks that could threaten area drinking water, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
State and local prosecutors announced Tuesday that AT&T California was paying up to $25 million to settle a lawsuit alleging that the telecommunications company repeatedly failed to test and repair hundreds of underground fuel tanks in California. State Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer said at a news conference that the settlement was the nation's second largest related to violations of underground storage tank laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1988 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
A layer of jet fuel up to 5 feet thick has contaminated ground water beneath huge storage tanks at Los Angeles International Airport, and airport officials have begun a large-scale assessment of potential problems from toxic materials at LAX.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | From the Washington Post
The Boeing Co. studied fuel tank problems in one of its jumbo jets in 1980--16 years before similar problems apparently contributed to the explosion of TWA Flight 800--but failed to give its report to safety investigators until this June.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|