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SCIENCE
October 11, 2012 | By Monte Morin
She was found roaming the streets of Fukushima's exclusion zone, the sprawling ghost town that now surrounds Japan's quake-crippled nuclear reactor. One of an unknown number of dogs that were left chained or abandoned amid the disaster, the haggard-looking mutt bore a scar over one ear and unmistakable signs of chronic stress. Yuki, as they called her, seemed to be suffering from a canine form of post-traumatic stress disorder. While some 340,000 people still live as refugees in the wake of the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami, animal science researchers at Azabu University report that former pets have also suffered lingering effects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
On March 18, 2011, an official from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission named Chuck Casto called together the NRC delegation on assignment with him in Tokyo. "We're in never-never land," he told them. Seven days earlier, a magnitude 9 earthquake had rattled a complex of six nuclear power plants known as Fukushima Daiichi, roughly 150 miles northeast of Tokyo. Then came nature's second, more devastating blow: a tsunami that swamped the complex, flooding its electrical generators and putting its three operating reactors out of commission.
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OPINION
March 11, 2012 | By Robert Peter Gale and F. Owen Hoffman
Yogi Berra supposedly said, "It's tough making predictions, especially about the future. " He was right. However, there is an out for forecasters trying to predict long-term medical consequences of the Fukushima nuclear facility accident: The final reckoning will take about 50 years; they are unlikely to be around to be judged wrong. With this reassurance in mind, we think the public deserves an estimate of likely outcomes of radiation released when the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami caused multiple meltdowns of nuclear fuel at the plant.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Up and down the West Coast, starfish are dying. Casualties of a mysterious disease known as seastar wasting syndrome, they are dying in Alaska, deteriorating in San Diego and disappearing from long stretches  in between. Death from the disease is quick and icky. It begins with a small lesion on a starfish's body that rapidly develops into an infection the animal cannot fight. Over the course of the disease the starfish's legs might drop off, or even separate from the body and start to crawl away, as you can see in the PBS news story below.
SPORTS
September 19, 2013 | By David Wharton
Less than two weeks after he promised the 2020 Tokyo Olympics would be safe from radioactive contamination, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ordered the scrapping of two more reactors at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant. Abe made the announcement after touring the crippled facility on Thursday. "I will work hard to counter rumors questioning the safety of the Fukushima plant," he said, according to Reuters . Four of the plant's reactors suffered meltdowns and other damage after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, leading to widespread contamination in the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl.
WORLD
June 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
After the cascade of disasters that befell Japan 27 months ago, then-Prime Minister Naoto Kan took the brunt of withering criticism for shoddy nuclear safety standards at the crippled Fukushima reactor complex and the government's chaotic emergency response to the crises. Kan also took away a life-altering lesson. A longtime proponent of nuclear energy for his densely populated, resource-poor nation, the government leader who resigned in disgrace five months after the March 11, 2011, earthquake-triggered tsunami and nuclear disaster is now at the forefront of Japan's movement to phase out atomic power.
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The canopies of kelp undulating in the surges off the coast of California camouflage a complex ecosystem of sharks, rock fish, crabs, urchins and anemones that blossom like colorful flowers on the forest floor. Now, Steven L. Manley, a biology professor at Cal State Long Beach, and Kai Vetter, head of applied nuclear physics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have launched a campaign to monitor those groves for radioactive contaminants due to arrive later this year in ocean currents from Japan's damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.
SPORTS
September 12, 2013 | By David Wharton
The fallout over Tokyo hosting the 2020 Summer Olympics has begun. So to speak. A satirical French newspaper called Le Canard enchaine  has published cartoons that reference both the Games and radioactive leaks at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant. One cartoon shows a pair of sumo wrestlers with extra arms and legs. They are wrestling in front of the plant while a commentator says: "Thanks to Fukushima, sumo wrestling is now an Olympic sport. " Another cartoon shows two people in protective gear inspecting an Olympic pool with their Geiger counter.
WORLD
September 15, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM-- Israel has 80 nuclear warheads and the potential to double that number, according to a new report by U.S. experts. In the Global Nuclear Weapons Inventories , recently published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , proliferation experts Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris write that Israel stopped production of nuclear warheads in 2004. But the country has enough fissile material for an additional 115 to 190 warheads, according to the report, meaning it could as much as double its arsenal.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Up and down the West Coast, starfish are dying. Casualties of a mysterious disease known as seastar wasting syndrome, they are dying in Alaska, deteriorating in San Diego and disappearing from long stretches  in between. Death from the disease is quick and icky. It begins with a small lesion on a starfish's body that rapidly develops into an infection the animal cannot fight. Over the course of the disease the starfish's legs might drop off, or even separate from the body and start to crawl away, as you can see in the PBS news story below.
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The canopies of kelp undulating in the surges off the coast of California camouflage a complex ecosystem of sharks, rock fish, crabs, urchins and anemones that blossom like colorful flowers on the forest floor. Now, Steven L. Manley, a biology professor at Cal State Long Beach, and Kai Vetter, head of applied nuclear physics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have launched a campaign to monitor those groves for radioactive contaminants due to arrive later this year in ocean currents from Japan's damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Radiation detected off the U.S. West Coast from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan has declined since the 2011 tsunami disaster and never approached levels that could pose a risk to human health, seafood or wildlife, scientists say. Experts have been trying to dispel worries stemming from a burst of online videos and blog posts in recent months that contend radiation from Fukushima is contaminating beaches and seafood and harming sea...
SPORTS
September 19, 2013 | By David Wharton
Less than two weeks after he promised the 2020 Tokyo Olympics would be safe from radioactive contamination, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ordered the scrapping of two more reactors at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant. Abe made the announcement after touring the crippled facility on Thursday. "I will work hard to counter rumors questioning the safety of the Fukushima plant," he said, according to Reuters . Four of the plant's reactors suffered meltdowns and other damage after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, leading to widespread contamination in the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl.
WORLD
September 15, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM-- Israel has 80 nuclear warheads and the potential to double that number, according to a new report by U.S. experts. In the Global Nuclear Weapons Inventories , recently published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , proliferation experts Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris write that Israel stopped production of nuclear warheads in 2004. But the country has enough fissile material for an additional 115 to 190 warheads, according to the report, meaning it could as much as double its arsenal.
SPORTS
September 12, 2013 | By David Wharton
The fallout over Tokyo hosting the 2020 Summer Olympics has begun. So to speak. A satirical French newspaper called Le Canard enchaine  has published cartoons that reference both the Games and radioactive leaks at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant. One cartoon shows a pair of sumo wrestlers with extra arms and legs. They are wrestling in front of the plant while a commentator says: "Thanks to Fukushima, sumo wrestling is now an Olympic sport. " Another cartoon shows two people in protective gear inspecting an Olympic pool with their Geiger counter.
SPORTS
September 7, 2013 | By David Wharton
The International Olympic Committee has selected Tokyo to host the 2020 Summer Games. The Japanese city, considered a favorite to be chosen as host, prevailed over Istanbul in a second-round vote Saturday among IOC members gathered in Buenos Aires. A third finalist, Madrid, was eliminated from consideration during the first round of voting. Tokyo representatives had portrayed their city as the safe choice, a modern metropolis that had provided a successful Olympic Games in 1964 and could once again handle the world's grandest sporting event.
OPINION
June 30, 2012
Re "Planning for power without San Onofre," and "San Onofre's cloudy future," Editorial, June 24 It is indeed a fine mess with the steam generators at the San Onofre power plant just south of Orange County, but it is not an excuse to abandon the plant or nuclear energy. Regardless of the financial outcome, it will still be less expensive to fix or replace the steam generators, hopefully with a big contribution from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, than to build new plants of any kind or to buy power from out of state.
OPINION
August 29, 2013
Re "Nuclear waste can't wait," Editorial, Aug. 25 Three Mile Island. Chernobyl. Fukushima. Had none of these disasters occurred, the idea that our government could find a secure, cost-effective way to store nuclear waste for tens of thousands of years would still be absurd. The huge piles of nuclear waste already on the planet will remain dangerous for far more than 10 times as long as all of recorded history. And we are adding to them at an alarming rate. The only sane nuclear policy is to dismantle all nuclear weapons and decommission all nuclear power plants.
OPINION
August 29, 2013
Re "Nuclear waste can't wait," Editorial, Aug. 25 Three Mile Island. Chernobyl. Fukushima. Had none of these disasters occurred, the idea that our government could find a secure, cost-effective way to store nuclear waste for tens of thousands of years would still be absurd. The huge piles of nuclear waste already on the planet will remain dangerous for far more than 10 times as long as all of recorded history. And we are adding to them at an alarming rate. The only sane nuclear policy is to dismantle all nuclear weapons and decommission all nuclear power plants.
WORLD
August 21, 2013 | By Yuriko Nagano
TOKYO -- Japan's Nuclear Regulation Authority is considering a heightened "serious incident" designation for the leakage of 300 tons of highly radioactive water at the tsunami-damaged nuclear plant at Fukushima. The country's nuclear regulator earlier this week classified the spillage from a storage tank as a Level 1 incident, the second-lowest designation for nuclear accidents as classified by the International Atomic Energy Agency. But serious concerns over the leakage discovered Monday are causing the agency to consider raising the classification to Level 3, or a "serious incident," based on the concentration of radioactivity in the water and the size of the leak.
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