Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFumihiko Maki
IN THE NEWS

Fumihiko Maki

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The mess at ground zero has been a collaborative production. The delays, backbiting, design compromises and massive cost overruns that have marked the rebuilding process at the World Trade Center site are the sorry collective work of politicians angling for higher office, architects turning Sept. 11 cynically to their advantage and city, state and federal bureaucrats working at cross purposes for years on end. But if you had to pick a leading villain in this decade-long black comedy, it would probably be developer Larry Silverstein.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The mess at ground zero has been a collaborative production. The delays, backbiting, design compromises and massive cost overruns that have marked the rebuilding process at the World Trade Center site are the sorry collective work of politicians angling for higher office, architects turning Sept. 11 cynically to their advantage and city, state and federal bureaucrats working at cross purposes for years on end. But if you had to pick a leading villain in this decade-long black comedy, it would probably be developer Larry Silverstein.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | MAGGIE JACKSON, Associated Press
Japan's top architects have tasted freedom and found it heady. Now their own masters, they worship no ideologies of past style or futuristic form. "We are free from icons, free from gods," said Kisho Kurokawa, with the jumbled silhouette of Tokyo stretching below his studio windows. "It's a new age, a dynamic situation." Architectural critics and Kurokowa's colleagues agree.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki, who is revered for fusing cultural elements of the East and the West in meticulously designed modernist buildings, has won the 1993 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The coveted award, known as the Nobel of architecture, includes a $100,000 grant and a medal, which will be presented on June 10 at Prague Castle in the recently formed Czech Republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki, who is revered for fusing cultural elements of the East and the West in meticulously designed modernist buildings, has won the 1993 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The coveted award, known as the Nobel of architecture, includes a $100,000 grant and a medal, which will be presented on June 10 at Prague Castle in the recently formed Czech Republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Building a Museum: The Santa Monica-based architecture firm Morphosis is one of six finalists chosen by the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago to design a new building and sculpture garden, the museum announced Monday. The other firms are Emilio Ambasz (New York), Tadao Ando (Osaka), Josef Paul Kleihues (Berlin), Fumihiko Maki (Tokyo) and Christian de Portzamparc (Paris). The building will open in 1995.
REAL ESTATE
January 29, 1989
Architects Ricardo Legorreta of Mexico, Fumihiko Maki of Japan, Richard Meier of the United States and Richard Rogers of England will join in a free, full-day symposium, "Architecture/Shaping the Future," on Saturday at UC San Diego, starting at 9 a.m. The symposium will celebrate the founding of the University's new School of Architecture. Meier has been commissioned to design the Getty Art Center in Los Angeles and Legorreta the International Student Center at UCLA.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Inaugural Season: Multidisciplinary presentations by Bay Area artists along with their international peers will highlight the inaugural 1993-94 season at San Francisco's new Yerba Buena Gardens Center for the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2006 | From Associated Press
The creator of the Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris and the Japanese winner of a prestigious architectural award will design the next two office towers to be built at the World Trade Center site. Lord Richard Rogers, a British architect known for the Pompidou Centre and the Millennium Dome in England, and Fumihiko Maki, a Pritzker Prize winner who is designing a temporary United Nations headquarters, will create the two towers at the 16-acre trade center site.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: 1) "Building Seagram. " Phyllis Lambert's book on the great Mies tower is a rare attempt to blend memoir with rigorous architectural history. 2) Citi Bike. Among other benefits, New York's bike-share system is great for 2-wheeled architecture tours. Too bad L.A.'s is stalled. 3) Cornfield Arroyo Seco Specific Plan. A zoning blueprint without parking requirements?
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | MAGGIE JACKSON, Associated Press
Japan's top architects have tasted freedom and found it heady. Now their own masters, they worship no ideologies of past style or futuristic form. "We are free from icons, free from gods," said Kisho Kurokawa, with the jumbled silhouette of Tokyo stretching below his studio windows. "It's a new age, a dynamic situation." Architectural critics and Kurokowa's colleagues agree.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Praemium Imperiales: American sculptor Louise Bourgeois, German painter Anselm Kiefer, German choreographer-director Pina Bausch, Canadian jazz pianist Oscar Peterson and Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki are this year's recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Awards for outstanding achievement in the arts. The awards, to be presented Oct. 28 in Tokyo by the Japan Art Assn., include cash prizes of about $120,000 each. * Harold Can't Dance?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Tadao Ando, a self-taught Japanese architect known for artistically composed buildings that function efficiently and delight the senses, is the winner of the 1995 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The annual award, known as the Nobel of architecture, comes with a $100,000 grant and a medal, to be presented to Ando on May 22 at the Grand Trianon Palace in Versailles, France.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|