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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown ushered in the most sweeping changes to the way California funds its public schools in 25 years on Monday, signing into law a new funding formula that was the centerpiece of his legislative agenda for the year.  Schools that serve low-income students and non-native English speakers will receive more money under the formula, while all school districts will be given new flexibility in how they spend the funds they receive...
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OPINION
April 11, 2014
Re "U.S. to remove 50 ICBMs from silos," April 9 This article states that the federal government will keep 50 missile silos "warm but empty" in Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming even though they are no longer needed. They will be maintained as a boon to local economies. This is federal welfare at its best. Don Lemly San Clemente ALSO: Letters: Unsung heroes in the LAPD Letters: About those beef price stats Letters: Medicare payments analyzed
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NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
The House of Representatives on Tuesday quickly and unanimously passed a bill temporarily extending funding for the Federal Aviation Administration and federal highway programs.   Funding for more than a million federal employees and construction jobs was set to expire by Oct. 1 if extensions were not passed, and though both parties had their misgivings about the bill, no House members wanted to be tied to such a job loss. The FAA's funding through Jan. 31 comes from the 22nd consecutive extension bill since the last long-term funding bill for it expired in 2007.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Ruben Vives
The long-running Bell corruption scandal drew toward an end Wednesday when five former council members pleaded no contest to criminal charges and agreed to pay restitution to the small, cash-strapped city that could approach $1 million. The pleas end the prosecution of seven officials accused of bilking the city out of more than $10 million that they used for excessive salaries and perks. At one point, council members were receiving up to $100,000 a year for their part-time work, while the city's top administrator, Robert Rizzo, pulled in $1.5 million annually in total compensation.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Twitter Inc. doesn't seem to be in any hurry to offer its shares to the public. Instead it has raised another round of funding from some very deep-pocketed and plugged-in private investors. The San Francisco company acknowledged a "significant" round of funding from preexisting investors and new investor Digital Sky Technologies, the investment engine run by Russian billionaire Yuri Milner. Milner has significant stakes in social networking's hottest companies, including Facebook Inc. People familiar with the funding peg it at $800 million, which would make Twitter worth $8 billion.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Planned Parenthood is yet again at the center of a political maelstrom. Republican lawmakers want to cut funding to the organization, or else they will not agree to a budget that has spending cuts of more than $30 billion. Defenders of Planned Parenthood say the cuts are dangerous for women’s health.  Huffington Post  frames the current conflict this way: “The United States government is on the verge of shutting down over a dispute...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
States are spending less on pre-kindergarten programs than they did a decade ago, according to a report released Monday. The National Institute for Early Education Research released the State of Preschool 2012 report, calling the last school year “the worst in a decade for progress in access to high-quality pre-K for America's children.” California state funding per child fell by more than than $400 compared with the previous year, and...
NATIONAL
September 13, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
The House of Representatives on Tuesday quickly and unanimously passed a bill temporarily extending funding for the Federal Aviation Administration and federal highway programs. Funding for more than 1 million federal employees and construction jobs was set to expire by Oct. 1 if extensions were not passed. Though both parties had misgivings about the bill, no House members wanted to be tied to a big job loss. The FAA's funding through Jan. 31 comes from the 22nd consecutive extension bill since the last long-term funding bill expired in 2007.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Snapchat, the Venice start-up that recently turned down a $3-billion acquisition offer from Facebook, has raised $50 million in a Series C round. The funding was provided by investment firm Coatue Management, which has offices in New York and Menlo Park, Calif. A Snapchat spokeswoman confirmed the funding by Coatue on Wednesday but didn't provide additional details. PHOTOS: Top 10 most talked-about people, topics on Facebook in 2013 Snapchat co-founder and Chief Executive Evan Spiegel signed off on the funding in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday.
FOOD
June 21, 2013 | By David Karp
Funding for the state certified farmers market program will likely expire at the end of December as a result of legislative maneuvering in Sacramento. The interruption may be just a month or so, and farmers markets would continue to exist during that period, but market oversight would be curtailed — just the opposite of what many stakeholders were aiming for from California State Legislature. A broad coalition of market managers and agricultural commissioners had hoped that the Legislature would substantially boost funding for enforcement starting next year, but for reasons that remain somewhat unclear, a bill to that effect, Assembly Bill 996 , failed to make it out of the Assembly Appropriations Committee four weeks ago. As a backup, farmers market industry leaders relied on SB 599 , which as originally written extended the current minimal funding for the state farmers market program for an additional four years; otherwise, it was due to expire at the end of 2013.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
A citywide coalition of community groups and civil rights leaders unveiled a comprehensive new measure Monday ranking L.A. Unified's neediest schools and urged more targeted spending on students there. The "student need index," which analyzed test scores, dropout rates, gun violence, asthma and eight other factors that affect learning, found that the neediest schools were concentrated in southern and eastern Los Angeles, along with the Pacoima area in the San Fernando Valley. The schools included Fremont and Jordan high schools, Bethune and Drew middle schools and Griffith Joyner and Woodcrest elementary schools.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Petruno
Over the last six years, roaring bears and raging bulls both have had their turns to be right about financial markets. But investing success in the next market phase could be far more about pinpointing individual opportunities than riding a wave. This is when it should pay for a money manager to have maximum flexibility: the option to go almost anywhere with investors' dollars in search of decent returns. That could include stocks, bonds, real estate or commodities, for example.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014
First Eagle Global •Ticker symbol: SGENX •Assets: $49 billion •5-year average annualized return: 15.1% •Year-to-date return: 2.8% •Annual expense ratio: 1.1% •Morningstar rating: Four stars (out of five) •Do managers invest their own money in the fund: Yes •www.feim.com •Maximum front-end sales charge: 5%, but can be bought without that charge through some fund supermarkets, including Charles Schwab. FPA Crescent •Ticker symbol: FPACX •Assets: $17 billion •5-year average annualized return: 15.3% •Year-to-date return: 1.7% •Annual expense ratio: 1.2% •Morningstar rating: Five stars (out of five)
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Petruno
Why bother with a "go-anywhere" mutual fund? For many investors the answer may be that there's no need. If you have a well-diversified portfolio and a truly long-term focus, your asset mix may suit you just fine. Older investors who are more fearful of severe losses, however, may have a different view. Ditto for investors who are looking to put money to work now but are wary with many stocks near record highs and with bond yields depressed. Chris Hauswirth, a principal at investment advisory firm Wetherby Asset Management in San Francisco, said he uses go-anywhere funds for 5% to 10% of some clients' portfolios, as a way to add diversification.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By David G. Savage and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court struck another major blow against long-standing restrictions on campaign money Wednesday, freeing wealthy donors to each give a total of $3.6 million this year to the slate of candidates running for Congress. Rejecting the restriction as a violation of free speech, the 5-4 ruling struck down a Watergate-era limit that Congress wrote to prevent a single donor from writing a large check to buy influence on Capitol Hill. It was the latest sign that the court's conservative majority intends to continue dismantling funding limits created over the last four decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Healthcare advocates Tuesday urged the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to set aside at least $11 million in additional funding for free medical services for low-income residents - including immigrants lacking legal status - who remain uninsured under Obamacare. Members of the faith-based coalition One L.A., labor groups and community healthcare organizations told reporters and board members that failing to expand a county program to serve thousands more poor and undocumented residents would endanger public health.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Venture capitalists, shmenture capitalists. That is not what Eric Migicovsky said to himself when he went out to get funding for a new smartwatch he and his team developed called Pebble. Migicovsky, who had some critical success with a Blackberry-compatible smartwatch called the inPulse, was hoping to fund his next venture the traditional Silicon Valley way -- through angels and venture capitalists. The new smartwatch would be compatible with the Android and iPhone, linking to the smartphone via Blue Tooth and would also have an e-paper screen that could easily be read in sunlight, as well as the ability to show emails, tell you who is calling on your phone, and serve as a bike computer for avid cyclists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
At a Pomona preschool recently, children played with a large wooden train set, built a fort with colorful cardboard blocks and listened attentively as their teacher discussed ways to be safe in school and outdoors. It was a typical day, but the program at Harrison Elementary School and many others like it are facing atypical times, because the agency that manages these Head Start contracts may lose its $220-million federal grant. The Los Angeles County Office of Education was included among more than 130 agencies around the country that did not meet federal performance standards and will now have to compete with other potential providers to receive funding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Dozens of students rallied at a meeting of the California State University governing board Wednesday, chanting and hoisting signs that urged the chancellor and trustees to roll back "success fees" that are raising costs on many campuses. More than 100 students marched in front of the police-guarded entrance of the chancellor's Long Beach office shouting, "We got 99 problems and student debt is one," and "No cuts, no fees, education should be free. " Campuses in San Diego and Fullerton recently joined nine others in enacting the fees to help pay for more classes, faculty hiring, counseling and other services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Millions of dollars in welfare benefits are ending up in banks' pockets each year when poor Californians access their taxpayer-funded benefits, according to state statistics and a report released Tuesday. Like many other states, California issues electronic cards to welfare recipients so they can withdraw public assistance from ATMs. Last year, $18.9 million was spent on ATM fees. The year before they topped $19.4 million. The state welfare system allows recipients to make four free withdrawals per month at ATMs run by MoneyPass, part of U.S. Bank.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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