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NEWS
September 20, 2001 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At its twice-yearly International Home Furnishings Market next month in High Point, N.C., the furniture industry is anticipating a ripple effect from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Although the market will proceed as planned, industry insiders believe that economic downturns will affect sales but that in the long run a strong cocooning trend might propel consumers to buy. "Everything is still on," says Cindy Sheaffer, director of media relations for the American Furniture Manufacturers Assn.
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REAL ESTATE
May 22, 2005 | From Times wire reports
The second-home market is so hot that the furniture industry is jumping in. Numerous manufacturers at the industry's recent product exposition in High Point, N.C., came out with lines of furniture that they touted as ideal for vacation homes. They've been slightly scaled down to better fit in 1,290 square feet, the median size of a second home in the U.S. according to the National Assn. of Realtors.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles area's furniture industry, which employs an estimated 63,000 people and generates annual sales of $1.3 billion, asserted Tuesday that it could be driven out of business by a stringent pollution-control rule proposed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Southern California's once-booming furniture industry, a center of furniture manufacturing in the West, has been struggling in recent years against tough competition from lower-cost Chinese manufacturers. But not all the local industry's players will benefit from a preliminary decision by the Bush administration to impose duties on imported Chinese bedroom furniture.
REAL ESTATE
May 22, 2005 | From Times wire reports
The second-home market is so hot that the furniture industry is jumping in. Numerous manufacturers at the industry's recent product exposition in High Point, N.C., came out with lines of furniture that they touted as ideal for vacation homes. They've been slightly scaled down to better fit in 1,290 square feet, the median size of a second home in the U.S. according to the National Assn. of Realtors.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Schafer Bros. furniture was just another small manufacturer that couldn't make it through the hard times. In January of last year, the 52-year-old Orange County company--victim to higher overhead and lower sales--closed its doors. Two months later, on the night before the company's equipment was sold at auction, former salesperson Janette Fling walked through the huge, quiet warehouse, looking at the rolls of leather and woodworking equipment tagged for sale.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | MICHELE INGRASSIA, NEWSDAY
These should be euphoric times for the furniture industry. The economy is good. Sales are soaring. And fashion cachet is no longer just some mindless hype attached to every new sofa skirt and chair arm. In fact, things look so robust that the International Home Furnishings Market here, the largest furniture fair in the world, plans to add a 17-story, $45 million showroom to a city that already explodes with more than 8 million square feet of display space.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The furniture industry slump has claimed another victim: Borneo International Furniture Inc., which operates a small chain of office and home furniture stores under the name BIF, has filed for bankruptcy court protection. Company lawyer Carl Grumer on Thursday blamed the bankruptcy on the economic downturn. BIF Inc., the U.S. arm of a South Korean company of the same name, filed a petition under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code on Dec. 27, citing assets of $40.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
You could say, "Only in Los Angeles." Francisco Pinedo, an upholsterer by trade, decided in 1989 to take his and his wife's savings of $10,000, buy equipment, lease a small factory and go into the furniture business, one of the city's oldest and largest industries. His timing was courageous, if nothing else.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barker Bros., Southern California's oldest furniture chain, filed for bankruptcy Monday morning and said it will liquidate its business to help pay its debts. Hours later, a spokeswoman for RB Furniture in Irvine said her company is "reviewing its current position" amid increasing speculation among its suppliers that the chain will also seek bankruptcy court protection.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
The question raised by Francisco Pinedo's plans to turn a few square blocks of South-Central L.A. into the leading furniture design mart on the West Coast is this: Can the city of Los Angeles get out of its own way? Pinedo, 40, is already responsible for one of the more striking real estate transformations the downtrodden community has ever seen. This is the conversion of four derelict brick warehouses and factories on South Western Avenue into the L.A.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2002 | Marla Dickerson and Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writers
Cheap imports have shuttered many a U.S. furniture plant. Determined that his Los Angeles factory would not meet the same fate, John Boyd found a way to capitalize on low-cost Chinese manufacturing. He began importing furniture and parts from China last year to cut costs. At the same time, he reorganized his own manufacturing operation to focus on areas in which he had an edge on the Chinese: small production runs, original designs, a rainbow of finishes and fast delivery. The mix of imports and innovation has led to lower prices and higher sales for John Boyd Designs, a maker of moderately priced bedroom, dining room and office furniture.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2002 | SIOBHAN HUGHES, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Michael Abrahams smiled as he pointed out the chrome curves of his new leather chair, the latest addition to the Brooklyn, N.Y., apartment he and his wife bought in January. "We're doing our little part for the economy," Abrahams said, describing recent purchases from IKEA, the world's largest retailer of home furnishings, and Rico, a local store that specializes in lamps, chairs and sofas. The example of the 33-year-old public relations executive and his living room shows how the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's furniture makers, who enjoyed a renaissance in the mid-1990s, are now getting crushed by the slumping economy and a fresh wave of imports from Asia. Dozens of furniture producers in the region have closed, laid off workers or shifted production overseas in recent months, according to the California Furniture Manufacturers Assn.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At its twice-yearly International Home Furnishings Market next month in High Point, N.C., the furniture industry is anticipating a ripple effect from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Although the market will proceed as planned, industry insiders believe that economic downturns will affect sales but that in the long run a strong cocooning trend might propel consumers to buy. "Everything is still on," says Cindy Sheaffer, director of media relations for the American Furniture Manufacturers Assn.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | Associated Press
HomeLife Furniture Corp., the eighth-largest U.S. furniture retailer, said it's shutting down. A brief statement on the privately held company's Web site said: "We regret that financial circumstances have resulted in the closure of our stores. We truly appreciate the patronage you have given HomeLife Furniture in the past." The site also advised customers on how to obtain refunds for undelivered merchandise. Callers to HomeLife's corporate offices in Hoffman Estates, Ill.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2002 | Marla Dickerson and Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writers
Cheap imports have shuttered many a U.S. furniture plant. Determined that his Los Angeles factory would not meet the same fate, John Boyd found a way to capitalize on low-cost Chinese manufacturing. He began importing furniture and parts from China last year to cut costs. At the same time, he reorganized his own manufacturing operation to focus on areas in which he had an edge on the Chinese: small production runs, original designs, a rainbow of finishes and fast delivery. The mix of imports and innovation has led to lower prices and higher sales for John Boyd Designs, a maker of moderately priced bedroom, dining room and office furniture.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lynn Starks-Williams turns away at the sight of bunk beds. Her lasting image of them froze in April 1997, when she walked into her daughter's bedroom and found Whitney, 3, strangled between her bunk bed's frame and guardrail. After learning that the bed's maker had ignored furniture industry guidelines that could have saved her daughter's life, the Oklahoma City mom campaigned relentlessly until her state voted to make voluntary bunk bed standards the law.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | From Baltimore Sun
Here are some pros and cons of furniture shopping online. The pros: * It saves time. You can visit lots of sites quickly. * With promotions to lure first-time customers and free delivery, prices are good. * Thirty-day money-back guarantees with free return shipping lower the risk factor. * No salespeople on commission loom over you. * You can shop when it's convenient. The cons: * You can't touch or see the actual piece.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | MICHELE INGRASSIA, NEWSDAY
These should be euphoric times for the furniture industry. The economy is good. Sales are soaring. And fashion cachet is no longer just some mindless hype attached to every new sofa skirt and chair arm. In fact, things look so robust that the International Home Furnishings Market here, the largest furniture fair in the world, plans to add a 17-story, $45 million showroom to a city that already explodes with more than 8 million square feet of display space.
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