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Fuse

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The title of Keith Urban 's new album, “Fuse,” says a lot about what and who is on it. The New Zealand-born country singer, songwriter, guitarist, producer and “American Idol” judge has collaborated with a slew of musicians and producers he'd never worked with previously as his way of keeping things fresh for himself and for his fans. Case in point: Urban co-wrote and co-produced two songs -- “Good Thing” and “Red Camaro” -- with Mike Elizondo, who is known for his creative partnerships with hip-hop world luminaries such as Eminem, Dr. Dre, Jay-Z and 50 Cent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Sean Combs wants to light a fuse under his new cable network Revolt. The hip-hop mogul is said to have made a bid to buy Fuse, a music channel owned by Madison Square Garden Co. The bid comes after Combs launched his own music cable network Revolt TV last year. If Combs is successful in his efforts to acquire Fuse, he would most likely replace it with Revolt. Fuse is in over 70 million homes, while Revolt, which only launched last fall, is in a fraction of that. The rap star offered $200 million for Fuse, according to Bloomberg News.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin E. Salpeter, 83, an astrophysicist whose work in the "Salpeter-Bethe equation" showed how helium changes to carbon, died of leukemia Tuesday at his home in Ithaca, N.Y., according to Cornell University, where he had been a professor emeritus of physical sciences. Salpeter attended Cornell in 1949 as a postdoctoral student and spent his career there. In 1951, he and Cornell theoretical physicist Hans Bethe, winner of the 1967 Nobel Prize in physics, introduced an equation showing how helium nuclei fuse to form carbon in the interiors of ancient stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Paula L. Woods
No advice is more confusing to writers than "write what you know. " Taken to its solipsistic extremes, it would mean novelists could not write characters outside of their own gender, race, geography or professional background. While the works of Susan Straight, Khaled Hosseini, Elizabeth George and others make clear the fallacy of that thinking, a writer's experiences and observations do play a significant role, along with research, in creating a believable universe for their characters and stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2009 | Harriet Ryan and Richard Winton
Roman Polanski's attorneys helped provoke his arrest by complaining to an appellate court this summer that Los Angeles County prosecutors had made no real effort to capture the filmmaker in his three decades as a fugitive, two law enforcement sources familiar with the case told The Times. The accusation that the Los Angeles County district attorney's office was not serious about extraditing Polanski to facing sentencing in a child sex case he fled in 1978 was a minor point in two lengthy July court filings by the director's attorneys.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The approach of winter means the prime season for power failures. Storms can down power lines and darken entire neighborhoods. The use of electric blankets and space heaters puts an added strain on home electrical systems. By preparing for the possibility of a power outage, you'll lessen chances that you'll be left in the dark. Most of these suggestions also apply year-round. How to prepare for an outage: Keep several flashlights on hand and test them now and then.
SPORTS
September 6, 2002
"I'm not here to win no division title. I'm not here to get to the first round of the playoffs. This is my eighth year. My string's getting pretty short. Light my fuse and let me blow up."- - Warren Sapp, Tampa Bay Buccaneer defensive tackle
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1987
. . . And speaking of historical accuracy in the TV miniseries "Napoleon and Josephine"--how about that Bic lighter that that crafty monarchist used to light the fuse that blew up the wagon. Now there's a man who was ahead of his time. KELLEY PALMER Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
"Jackass" star Johnny Knoxville was cited Thursday morning at Los Angeles International Airport for allegedly attempting to carry an inert grenade onto a plane. Knoxville allegedly had the grenade in a carry-on bag. It was noticed by a screener as the actor was about to board an American Airlines flight, officials said. LAX authorities detained Knoxville and issued him a citation for attempting to take a "prohibited item" on a plane. The grenade had no fuse or powder. The incident is being investigated by the Los Angeles Police Department.
SPORTS
March 6, 2004
I'm glad my fellow season-ticket holder Tony Siracusa [Viewpoint, Feb. 28] thinks that Ben Howland will lead the second coming of the Bruins. After all, Ben's nationally acclaimed ability led the Bruins to a 9-3 start. Whoops. After fully installing his vaunted defense, his team goes 2-11 against many of the same teams. What am I missing? Did a group of average players suddenly disintegrate? Or did Coach Ben insist the team play his strict style, instead of adapting to the ability of the players?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Shakespeare and contemporary popular music might seem like strange bedfellows, but his plays have a way of coalescing with whatever musical style is thrown their way. A rock version of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" won the Tony for best musical in 1972, proving that not even the zaniest combination is off the table. A curious experiment is underway at the Old Globe Theatre pairing Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" with the moody songs of singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley, who died in a drowning accident in 1997 at age 30 but managed to leave a rich musical legacy that has spoken across generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Since joining the judging panel on "American Idol" last year, Keith Urban's constantly reminded of the one thing that separates the winners from the runners-up: hard work. "The other day, I was getting a bit worn down by people who were coming in to audition who just weren't good enough," the 45-year-old New Zealand-born country singer, songwriter and guitarist said recently from his home in Nashville. "They would start the pleading, 'I really want this!' You know," he added with a laugh, "nobody is walking in saying, 'I passively want this.' But it's not a job interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The title of Keith Urban 's new album, “Fuse,” says a lot about what and who is on it. The New Zealand-born country singer, songwriter, guitarist, producer and “American Idol” judge has collaborated with a slew of musicians and producers he'd never worked with previously as his way of keeping things fresh for himself and for his fans. Case in point: Urban co-wrote and co-produced two songs -- “Good Thing” and “Red Camaro” -- with Mike Elizondo, who is known for his creative partnerships with hip-hop world luminaries such as Eminem, Dr. Dre, Jay-Z and 50 Cent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
Authorities said Wednesday that they have identified the man found with an explosive and artillery fuses in his luggage when he boarded a plane at John Wayne Airport. Gregory Salyer, 23, from Kentucky, was arrested Tuesday after Transportation Security Administration agents found suspicious devices in his luggage and called the Orange County Sheriff's Department bomb squad, according to a Sheriff's Department spokesman. Salyer had three military artillery fuses and a sting ball grenade - a less-than-lethal explosive that shoots out rubber projectiles - in his checked bag when he boarded a 3:18 p.m. flight to Denver,  sheriff's Lt. Jeff Hallock told the Daily Pilot.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By August Brown
Musician and producer Sam Spiegel lives in a wooden A-frame house in the Hollywood Hills. It's a beautiful place, but its best feature is an apropos (if possibly apocryphal) history of weird musical collaboration. "The guy who sold it to me says he has a picture of Jimi Hendrix in a dashiki jamming in here with David Crosby," he said. "Allegedly, though. He's never shown it to me. " If it's true, the story fits him. Spiegel is a contemporary kind of artist - a musician, record producer and general-idea-guy whose work exists almost only in tandem with someone else's.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Material Reflex," a tight introduction to Sonya Clark's work at the Craft & Folk Art Museum, centers on the evocative and provocative power of hair. This isn't new territory. Others have taken on hair as an integral marker of African American identity, especially: Think of Lorna Simpson's attention to hairstyle and wigs; Kori Newkirk's use of beads, synthetic hair and pomade; Alison Saar's casting of hair as roots, branches, vessels, connective currents. Clark, whose heritage is African American, Caribbean and Scottish, shows quite poignantly that even if familiar, the territory is not exhausted.
SPORTS
May 12, 1989 | From Times wire service s
John Cook, who won the International two years ago, will undergo hand surgery and miss the fourth annual tournament when it is held at Castle Pines Golf Club Aug. 17 through 20. Cook, 31, of Rancho Mirage, Calif., was playing in the Memorial Tournament this week and will compete in the Colonial Invitational next week, then leave the PGA tour to have surgery on his right hand in early June. He said he has been told that the operation, to remove bone chips and fuse two joints, will require three months of rehabilitation and that he probably won't resume tournament play until next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
These are difficult times for Abstract Expressionists. In this post-"painting-is-dead" era, when the only critical justification for applying paint to canvas appears to be tied firmly to conceptual issues such as appropriation and simulation, surviving members of the New York School often appear as stubborn anachronisms, tied to a long-dead era of high Modernism.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Futurama" (Comedy Central, Wednesdays). Science fiction and comedy are "like that. " (Writer crosses fingers to indicate closeness.) Each takes emerging facts to their extreme, often absurd conclusions; both are fundamentally philosophical - though each has time for exhilarating idiocy - and in imagining what might be, each takes the measure of what is. "1984" was about "1948," and "Brave New World" is a funny book. Created by Matt Groening, who invented "The Simpsons" and changed the world, and developed with David X. Cohen, "Futurama" fuses the two forms as if in the warp core of some spaceship I am imagining as I type.
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