Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFuture
IN THE NEWS

Future

FEATURED ARTICLES
AUTOS
January 7, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
Consider it a crystal ball into the future of car collecting. Hagerty Insurance, the world's largest insurer of classic cars, is out with its annual list of top 10 vehicles the company expects to become future collector items. The cars' prices range from the tiny Ford Fiesta ST at $21,400 to the raucous Jaguar F-Type R roadster at a hair under $100,000. To make the list, the vehicle had to be built in 2014 and feature a starting price under $100,000. Hagerty said it gave special consideration to vehicles not appearing on previous lists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
SACRAMENTO -- Sad news for Lakers writers. There might be only seven games left to cover the eminently quotable, entirely likable Nick Young . But good news for Young: Lakers governor Jeanie Buss loves his personality, seeing a player who can connect with fans. It might not lead to more money when he becomes a free agent this summer, because Buss defers to her brother, Jim , and Lakers General Manager Mitch Kupchak to make the business decisions. But it can't hurt the player who calls himself "Swaggy P," the "P" still an unknown entity that Young is reluctant to reveal.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 3, 2011
sfgfasd
SPORTS
April 1, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
The Lakers are planning to build a more modern training facility that they hope will also attract future free agents, The Times has learned. They will stay in El Segundo because they like the area and its proximity to LAX, but will no longer share a building with the Kings and a skating rink often open for public use. The Lakers have been at the place currently known as Toyota Sports Center since 2000, which was built for about $24 million by...
OPINION
March 19, 2013
Re "Too darn hot," Opinion, March 14 William deBuys painted a doom-and-gloom picture of my city, Phoenix, based on climate change and water use, warning if we don't take better care of our land and resources, Phoenicians will flee. Just like Los Angeles, Phoenix has its challenges. That's why we recognized the need for future-oriented solutions like the Central Arizona Project canals and the Groundwater Management Act, the latter of which requires builders to demonstrate they will be able to have a 99-year water supply.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
In honor of the delicate future of Spike Jonze's “Her,” we've been chatting with the team that helped him realize those not-so-far-off days. (You can read previous installments, on costumes and production design, here and here ). Today, a talk with Hoyte van Hoytema, the decorated Swiss-Dutch cinematographer who shot the film. Movies Now : When you first heard about shooting a movie like this set in the future, you must have thought, "Oh, a movie set in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Looks like Drake and Future have decided to play nice. Earlier this week, reports surfaced that Drake had booted Future from his upcoming arena trek over disparaging remarks the Atlanta rapper made about Drake's latest album during an interview with Billboard. But the two rapper-singers have since buried the hatchet and on Thursday, Future announced that he would indeed appear on Drake's 39-city tour. "I am set to continue as planned with Drake and Miguel on the Would You Like a Tour?
OPINION
September 1, 2012
Re "Survey offers dire picture of state's two-year colleges," Aug. 29 No longer can those fresh out of high school easily step into middle-class jobs. Today, high school is not enough. Additional education and better job skills are necessary for anything beyond low-wage work. The hundreds of thousands of students on those community college waiting lists know this. The future of middle class jobs is at stake. Private enterprise will not provide the education and skill training needed for these jobs.
OPINION
March 1, 2013
Re “ Judging the Voting Rights Act ,” Editorial, Feb. 26 The Supreme Court should not substitute its judgment for Congress' on voting rights. A short time in the future, today's minority will become our nation's majority. That may possibly include those sitting on the Supreme Court bench. Tomorrow's ex-majority may need the same voting protections as today's minority does. Indeed, the shoe may be on the other foot. Ken Johnson Pinon Hills More letters to the editor ...  
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Most people may take natural gas for granted. It fuels the flame on your stove, fires your furnace. It's there when you need it. For Sempra Energy, natural gas is big business. The San Diego company owns Southern California Gas Co., the nation's largest natural gas distribution company, and San Diego Gas & Electric, one of the largest publicly owned power companies in the country. Sempra reported net income of $1 billion last year on revenue of $10.6 billion. It has 17,000 employees worldwide and provides energy to more than 30 million people.
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
He's often the forgotten one in the Lakers' mash-up of who's coming-who's going after this season. It's easy to understand why Robert Sacre is overlooked even though he's one of only four Lakers under contract after June - three if you toss out Nick Young , who is expected to decline a player option for $1.2 million. In the race to analyze/criticize the $23.5 million coming to Kobe Bryant next season and the $9.7 million due to Steve Nash , Sacre's $915,243 just doesn't measure up. But he'll be here unless he's traded.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
Only the very best teams in college basketball have advanced to the NCAA tournament's round of 16. Take Dayton versus Stanford in the South Regional … please. Dayton finished fifth in the Atlantic 10 Conference and absorbed a 26-point loss this season at St. Joseph's. Stanford tuned up for the NCAA tournament with an invigorating 25-point loss to UCLA. UCLA is not one to talk, though, losing its last Pac-12 Conference regular-season game, by 18, at doormat Washington State.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
As Shabazz Muhammad's father is sentenced Thursday in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas for conspiracy to commit fraud, UCLA faces its most significant men's basketball game since 2008. Muhammad is in the NBA now, but the off-court problems he brought to UCLA last season continue to dog the school. According to a sentencing brief filed last week , Ron Holmes told the FBI he received a loan based on his son's future professional basketball earnings. Estimated at $350,000 in another court document, the loan was Holmes' principal source of income at the time and came from an unnamed "marketing company.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - A tiny Irvine company founded by a 21-year-old Cal State Long Beach drop-out may play a leading role in Facebook's next major bet on the future of the Internet: that virtual reality will change the way people experience the Web. Facebook said Tuesday that it was buying Oculus VR, maker of virtual reality headsets for video game players, for $2 billion. The ultimate goal of the acquisition, the giant social network said, is to create an immersive 3-D experience in which users don't just chat online with friends but grab a cup of coffee with them in a virtual cafe or travel with them to distant places, just by putting on a pair of goggles with dark lenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
From Harry Potter to Bella Swan to Katniss Everdeen, the hottest phenomenon in publishing these days is young adult fiction about risk takers who dare to go their own way. So it's more than a little ironic, if predictable, that films made from these books are completely risk aversive. Why rock the boat and jeopardize a potentially huge franchise if you don't really have to? "Divergent" is the latest, most snug-fitting version of that trend. As directed by Neil Burger ("The Illusionist," "Limitless")
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
PEREVALNE, Ukraine - Crimean voters went to the polls Sunday to decide whether to end their decades-long ties to Ukraine in a referendum rejected as illegal by the nation's leaders in Kiev and most Western powers. Balloting was being carried out under the watchful eyes of Russian forces and pro-Russia militia who largely seized control of the peninsula late last month. “The referendum will pass the way the Crimean people choose and it will be inexorable and categorical,” Sergei Aksenov, the region's new pro-Russia premier, wrote Sunday in his Twitter account before the polls opened.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
DE KALB, Miss. - Looming like a spaceship over pine and sweet-gum forest, the high-tech power plant under construction in rural Kemper County is a $5-billion wager on an energy future that includes coal. The Kemper plant is scheduled to open this year as the first in the United States to ramp up technology to remove carbon dioxide emissions on a large scale. If it works as planned, up to 65% of the plant's potential carbon dioxide emissions would be removed. But if its progress is any indication, building a coal plant that can sharply reduce greenhouse gas pollution is a white-knuckle ride.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|