Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFuture Trading
IN THE NEWS

Future Trading

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 12, 1990
In the Aug. 29 Metro section you reported: 1) "Council OKs Hike in Tax on Businesses" 2) "LAX Parking Fees to Increase Again" When will this taxation stop? Recently, every time I pick up a publication, higher taxes are being reported. Will 1990 be known as the year of "gouge the taxpayers to death"? I will vote against every incumbent currently in office. I will encourage family, friends and co-workers to do the same.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Andrew Tangel
WASHINGTON - President Obama tapped a senior Treasury official to take over as one of Wall Street's top regulators, leading the agency charged with overseeing complex financial derivatives. Obama said Tuesday he would nominate Timothy Massad to succeed Gary Gensler as chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Gensler's term expires at the end of the year. Massad has spent more than two years in charge of winding down the $700-billion financial crisis bailout fund, which has turned into a gain for taxpayers so far, though a small projected loss on paper.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994
In response to your article "Hillary Clinton's Futures Trades Unusual, Experts Say," March 31: Mrs. Clinton is the victim of sexist critics who resent the fact that she is a bold and assertive woman. She is being criticized for her willingness to take risks, resulting in her turning small amounts of money into large amounts--something a man would be congratulated and admired for doing. Her critics cannot accept that a woman could have made such profitable investments. Sure, some of her investments went sour (including Whitewater)
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The votes of traders in political futures have been pouring in for months, and they say President Obama lands a second term in Tuesday's election. The chances that Obama is reelected stood at about 71% on Tuesday morning on Intrade , near a one-month high and up about 3% for the day in early trading. The chances that Republican Mitt Romney wins the presidency were about 29%, close to a low for the past month and down about 4%. Most people buying political futures on the site also apparently believe that Republicans will retain control of the House and Democrats will hold on to their majority in the Senate.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The votes of traders in political futures have been pouring in for months, and they say President Obama lands a second term in Tuesday's election. The chances that Obama is reelected stood at about 71% on Tuesday morning on Intrade , near a one-month high and up about 3% for the day in early trading. The chances that Republican Mitt Romney wins the presidency were about 29%, close to a low for the past month and down about 4%. Most people buying political futures on the site also apparently believe that Republicans will retain control of the House and Democrats will hold on to their majority in the Senate.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2009 | Tom Petruno
Gold and other precious metals soared again Wednesday amid a buying stampede. Near-term gold futures in New York jumped $13.90, or 1.4%, to finish the session at $1,018.90 an ounce, a record closing high. Silver rocketed 43 cents, or 2.5%, to $17.41 an ounce; platinum gained $29.80, or 2.3%, to close at $1,350.10. "It's really a feeding frenzy," said Larry Young, senior trader at Infinity Futures in Chicago. Gold is up 7.1% so far this month, beating the 4.7% advance in the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Andrew Tangel
WASHINGTON - President Obama tapped a senior Treasury official to take over as one of Wall Street's top regulators, leading the agency charged with overseeing complex financial derivatives. Obama said Tuesday he would nominate Timothy Massad to succeed Gary Gensler as chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Gensler's term expires at the end of the year. Massad has spent more than two years in charge of winding down the $700-billion financial crisis bailout fund, which has turned into a gain for taxpayers so far, though a small projected loss on paper.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Are Californians bigger risk takers than investors in other parts of the country? It appears so when it comes to futures trading. The state is home to the largest number of individual speculators who are, in effect, betting on the future price of anything from Treasury bonds to pork bellies, according to brokers. "There are more speculators out here," said Lee R. Brooks, first vice president and manager of the futures department at Bateman Eichler, Hill Richards.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
Chicago's commodity markets said Friday that they will test their proposed global electronic futures-trading system next month though they still lack enough commitments from other exchanges to make it a reality. The Chicago Mercantile Exchange and Chicago Board of Trade hope to begin operating the long-delayed Globex system around the middle of this year, Board of Trade Chairman William O'Connor told traders and brokers at the Futures Industry Assn.'s annual meeting in Boca Raton.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Trading in crude oil futures would be temporarily suspended in response to large price swings, under a plan approved today by the New York Mercantile Exchange. "For the first time, the exchange will be imposing trade cessations as circuit-breakers," President R. Patrick Thompson said. The proposed changes would allow crude oil futures to rise or fall by up to $15 per barrel each day, far more than they have ever moved.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2011 | Reuters
U.S. regulators launched one of the biggest ever crackdowns on oil price manipulation Tuesday, suing two well-known traders and two trading firms owned by Norwegian billionaire John Fredriksen for allegedly making $50 million by squeezing markets in 2008. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission said traders James Dyer of Oklahoma's Parnon Energy and Nick Wildgoose of Europe-based Arcadia Energy amassed large physical positions at a key U.S. trading hub to create the impression of tight supplies that would boost oil prices.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
A proposed ban on box-office futures markets has survived a marathon House-Senate negotiation over the financial reform package that Congress is likely to pass next week. The provision, which was inserted after lobbying by the Motion Picture Assn. of America and others on behalf of the six major movie studios, would make box-office results only the second commodity on which futures trading is banned by law. The other is onions. Language banning box-office futures trading was included in the version of the financial reform package passed by the Senate, but not the House, leading to questions over whether it would appear in the final bill.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper and Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Despite opposition from the major Hollywood studios, federal regulators voted 3 to 2 on Monday to approve an investment vehicle that will allow professional traders to bet on the ticket sales that a movie generates during its opening weekend. The company that proposed the vehicle, Veriana, already won approval from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission for the exchange on which these contracts will be traded — the Trend Exchange — but it needed the commission to sign off on a contract to allow traders to begin placing positions.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission has filed civil charges against two Southern California men, alleging that they ran a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme that targeted Latinos, the commission announced Monday. Acting at the request of the commodities agency, U.S. District Judge Percy Anderson last week froze the assets of Ruben Gonzalez of West Covina and Jose C. Naranjo of La Mirada and their company, New Golden Investment Group. The defendants and the company could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
After losing a major regulatory battle over proposed box office futures markets, the major movie studios are going to Congress. Financial reform legislation unveiled Friday by Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.) contains a provision that would ban futures trading based on box office receipts. The move came the same day that the Commodity Futures Trading Commission unanimously approved the creation of one of two proposed markets that backers say would allow movie studios and financiers to hedge the risk of their investments in motion pictures.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2009 | Tom Petruno
Gold and other precious metals soared again Wednesday amid a buying stampede. Near-term gold futures in New York jumped $13.90, or 1.4%, to finish the session at $1,018.90 an ounce, a record closing high. Silver rocketed 43 cents, or 2.5%, to $17.41 an ounce; platinum gained $29.80, or 2.3%, to close at $1,350.10. "It's really a feeding frenzy," said Larry Young, senior trader at Infinity Futures in Chicago. Gold is up 7.1% so far this month, beating the 4.7% advance in the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1989 | From Reuters
Congress is considering far-reaching proposals to shore up public confidence in U.S. future markets, rocked by allegations of cheating, the chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee said Thursday. The proposals include adding muscle to the federal agency that monitors futures exchanges, curbing some trade practices and requiring markets to track trading activity more closely. Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont told Wendy L.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
The road to reforming financial regulations winds through the cornfields, hog farms and cattle ranches of America's heartland, and that complicates the Obama administration's already arduous effort to revamp oversight of Wall Street. Lawmakers from Iowa, Minnesota, Oklahoma and other farm-belt states who sit on the congressional agriculture committees have a surprisingly influential role in the administration's proposed overhaul, which Congress resumes debating Tuesday after its summer recess.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|