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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time he died in a plane crash alongside the Golden State Freeway, G. David Schine had fashioned a respected career a continent away from the Washington hearing rooms where he had been part of a furor that eventually toppled communist-hunting Sen. Joseph McCarthy. Schine's resume included stints as Los Angeles hotelier, executive producer of the film "The French Connection," record producer and chairman of a company that developed the technology to sharpen color television.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time he died in a plane crash alongside the Golden State Freeway, G. David Schine had fashioned a respected career a continent away from the Washington hearing rooms where he had been part of a scandal that eventually toppled communist-hunting Sen. Joseph McCarthy. Schine's resume included stints as Los Angeles hotelier, executive producer of the film "The French Connection," record producer and chairman of a company that developed the technology to sharpen color television.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time he died in a plane crash alongside the Golden State Freeway, G. David Schine had fashioned a respected career a continent away from the Washington hearing rooms where he had been part of a scandal that eventually toppled communist-hunting Sen. Joseph McCarthy. Schine's resume included stints as Los Angeles hotelier, executive producer of the film "The French Connection," record producer and chairman of a company that developed the technology to sharpen color television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time he died in a plane crash alongside the Golden State Freeway, G. David Schine had fashioned a respected career a continent away from the Washington hearing rooms where he had been part of a furor that eventually toppled communist-hunting Sen. Joseph McCarthy. Schine's resume included stints as Los Angeles hotelier, executive producer of the film "The French Connection," record producer and chairman of a company that developed the technology to sharpen color television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
G. David Schine--focus of the epic congressional hearings in the 1950s that led to the downfall of Sen. Joseph McCarthy--Schine's wife and their son were killed Wednesday when their single-engine plane crashed moments after takeoff from Burbank airport, police said. The plane, which may have suffered engine failure, apparently fell short while attempting an emergency landing on Interstate 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1996
The death of G. David Schine (June 20) brings back unwelcome memories of his trip to Germany in 1952 or 1953 with Roy Cohn, top aide to Sen. Joseph McCarthy. The appearance of these two young gumshoes on behalf of the demagogic, red-baiting McCarthy struck fear and loathing in hundreds of government clerks and officials. I was working for the Stars & Stripes, the U.S. Army newspaper, in Darmstadt, Germany, when we received the alarming news that Schine and Cohn were arriving to investigate alleged Communist influences in U.S. installations.
OPINION
May 6, 2003
History's image of Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy has defied all attempts at rehabilitation. The Senate's release Monday of secret transcripts of executive sessions that McCarthy held in 1953-54 won't change that. What the 4,232 pages will do is once again remind the United States that even as this democracy was successfully countering the Soviet Union's Marxist totalitarianism, it was itself flirting with oppression.
NEWS
March 6, 2000 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday's jetliner accident at Burbank Airport--thought to be the first involving a commercial plane in the facility's 69-year history--brought into focus long-standing safety concerns, not over the length of the runway but its proximity to the aged terminal. The terminal is 313 feet from the center line of the nearest runway, although the Federal Aviation Administration design standard calls for at least 750 feet between the two.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The problem with Sen. Joseph McCarthy, conjurer of the anti-Communist witch hunts of the 1950s, was that as unreal as his charges were, the hysteria he stage-managed wasn't. The problem with staging McCarthyism is capturing the very human pain he inflicted, while suggesting the peculiar mass hypnosis that gripped the country. The beauty of Frank Condon's production of Jeff Goldsmith's "McCarthy" at the Odyssey Theatre, is that telling this amazing American chapter looks like no problem at all.
OPINION
June 10, 2004 | Thomas Doherty
Fifty years ago this week, TV transmitted a sound bite heard down through the ages: "Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last? Have you left no sense of decency?" The words were spoken at the Army-McCarthy hearings, the speaker was Army attorney Joseph N. Welch and the antecedent was Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy. Welch's dramatic j'accuse quickly became audiovisual shorthand for the downfall of McCarthy. To many, it was a turning point in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
G. David Schine--focus of the epic congressional hearings in the 1950s that led to the downfall of Sen. Joseph McCarthy--Schine's wife and their son were killed Wednesday when their single-engine plane crashed moments after takeoff from Burbank airport, police said. The plane, which may have suffered engine failure, apparently fell short while attempting an emergency landing on Interstate 5.
OPINION
October 12, 1986 | Kay Mills, Kay Mills is a Times editorial writer
At 84, author Kay Boyle has mixed prose and protest virtually the entire century. One of the American expatriate writers in Paris in the heady 1920s, Boyle was a rebel then and is a rebel now. Rebelling means resisting authority. In the '20s, the authority to be resisted was the European tradition of writing. The authority Boyle resists today is President Reagan and his policies toward Libya and Nicaragua, among others. In between, there have been other authorities and just as much resistance.
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