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NEWS
June 1, 1990 | United Press International
Authorities said Thursday that opposition leader Joseph Redjambe, whose death in a hotel room sparked a week of riots in this central African country, had died of natural causes and not from foul play. An autopsy on Redjambe's body revealed no traces of violence and showed that the syringe marks on his body resulted from a treatment for diabetes, French and Gabonese officials said. Redjambe's death in a Libreville hotel room last week sparked riots across Gabon and nearly halted oil production.
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NEWS
December 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
More than 30 years after President Omar Bongo came to power, Gabonese voters turned out Sunday to decide whether the long-serving autocrat should be elected to another seven years. Despite reports of scattered rock-throwing incidents overnight in Libreville, Sunday's voting appeared to have come off without serious violence.
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NEWS
December 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
More than 30 years after President Omar Bongo came to power, Gabonese voters turned out Sunday to decide whether the long-serving autocrat should be elected to another seven years. Despite reports of scattered rock-throwing incidents overnight in Libreville, Sunday's voting appeared to have come off without serious violence.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | United Press International
Authorities said Thursday that opposition leader Joseph Redjambe, whose death in a hotel room sparked a week of riots in this central African country, had died of natural causes and not from foul play. An autopsy on Redjambe's body revealed no traces of violence and showed that the syringe marks on his body resulted from a treatment for diabetes, French and Gabonese officials said. Redjambe's death in a Libreville hotel room last week sparked riots across Gabon and nearly halted oil production.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A new outbreak of Ebola has killed nine people in Gabon, state radio announced in a rare government acknowledgment of the deadly disease. The outbreak is the third this year in the West African country. Ebola killed 30 people when it struck remote areas of Gabon in February and October. One of the world's deadliest diseases, Ebola causes massive internal bleeding and is spread through bodily fluids. It kills up to 80% of those infected, and there is no treatment or cure.
WORLD
September 4, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Gabon's government declared Ali Bongo, son of the late dictator Omar Bongo, the winner of presidential elections, triggering the worst violence in years in the oil-rich nation. Crowds in the coastal city of Port Gentil protesting Bongo's victory burned the French Consulate, attacked the offices of French oil giant Total and pillaged shops. Over four decades, the Bongo family has amassed a fortune from the country's oil wealth, owning 45 homes in France and more than a dozen luxury cars.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | Associated Press
A boat carrying scores of children believed to be destined for slavery was headed back to Benin after being turned away from ports in Cameroon and Gabon, government officials said Friday. The boat was thought to have left Cotonou clandestinely about three weeks ago. Government officials said they believe that about 100 children were aboard and that they had come from Benin and neighboring Togo.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | TINA SUSMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dawn has barely broken when Jonas Tahou enters the forest, trousers stuffed into knee-high rubber boots that sink in the mud as he marches silently through the trees and tangled vines. Somewhere in this sweltering jungle, in the deep green thicket that blocks the sun and swallows up Tahou's slender form, lives a killer rarely seen but always present, one that prowled the forest perhaps thousands of years before emerging 20 years ago to earn the name Ebola.
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