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Gabriel Beristain

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Among expatriate Mexican filmmakers, cinematographer Gabriel Beristain is the veteran in the crowd. Unlike other Mexican filmmakers in Hollywood, Beristain left Mexico in 1975, opting for Europe rather than the United States. "Instead of landing in El Paso, I landed in Southampton," he says. "In Mexico there was such a lack of creativity in filmmaking. Unfortunately there is still a terrible crisis." But after 16 years in Europe as a filmmaker, Beristain returned to his Mexican roots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Among expatriate Mexican filmmakers, cinematographer Gabriel Beristain is the veteran in the crowd. Unlike other Mexican filmmakers in Hollywood, Beristain left Mexico in 1975, opting for Europe rather than the United States. "Instead of landing in El Paso, I landed in Southampton," he says. "In Mexico there was such a lack of creativity in filmmaking. Unfortunately there is still a terrible crisis." But after 16 years in Europe as a filmmaker, Beristain returned to his Mexican roots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"K2" keeps it simple. A formidable mountain, howling winds and blinding snows, lionhearted climbers who know nothing of fear. Even as you're watching it you can imagine the ad campaign this might have inspired once upon a time: "Six Against the Snows! An Avalanche of Emotions! The Wind Was Cold . . . But the Women Were Warm!" In truth, "K2" (selected theaters, rated R for language) is something of a throwback, but a very sure-handed one.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirley MacLaine plays a sexy grandma in "Waiting for the Light" (throughout San Diego County)--actually, a sexy grand-aunt--and it is a mark of the movie's confused attack that it keeps waving her at the audience like a piquant flag.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"The Sentinel" is an unassuming thriller, a nifty piece of genre filmmaking without frills or self-importance. It's a throwback, if you will, to the days of B pictures, when formula movies were made with a maximum of skill and a minimum of pretense. Set in the no-nonsense domain of the U.S. Secret Service, where smiling on duty is apparently a capital offense, "The Sentinel" is made by people who not only believe in telling these kinds of stories, they believe in telling them right.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Derek Jarman's "Caravaggio" (at Beverly Center Cineplex) is a kinky ode to chiaroscuro and the dark side of the Renaissance, a luxuriantly eccentric look at the Bad-Boy-as-Artist. It's a film that rhapsodizes over the textures of paint and the textures of flesh--and the passions that join them together.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"The Courier" (Music Hall) is a mixture of two sensibilities, two kinds of movies: Irish gritty urban naturalism and pseudo-American thriller. It was co-directed by Joe Lee and scenarist Frank Deasy, and it's about a hero trapped and traveling between two worlds: Dublin's criminal underworld and the realm of law and order.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"There Be Dragons," most of which is set during the Spanish Civil War of the late 1930s, is supposed to be about the intersecting lives of a saint and a sinner. But it is a third man, a revolutionary, who nearly steals the show. Which might have been all right if writer-director Roland Joffé hadn't been so conflicted about whose story he wants to tell. But indecision can be deadly, and it proves to be here. The British director has done very well in the past with sprawling epic tales of religion (1986's "The Mission")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Most big-budget, dream-cast comedies are a lot like pea soup: A creamy mass, with the occasional lump of ham. "Trial and Error," starring "Seinfeld's" Michael Richards (in a very Kramer-esque performance), is a pretty soupy mess, but the croutons are fabulous--i.e. the statuesque Charlize Theron ("Two Days in the Valley"), with whom director Jonathan Lynn is either madly in love or knows a good thing when she comes into focus.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Going to this particular kennel for the fifth time since 1959, Disney trots out another incarnation of "The Shaggy Dog," its ever-hairy tale of man co-mingling with beast to his betterment. The original starred Tommy Kirk and Fred MacMurray, was one of the studio's first live-action comedies, and made lots of money.
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