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Gabriel Byrne

ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Glenn Whipp
The Coen brothers' new movie, "A Serious Man," opens with a piece of advice from medieval French rabbi Rashi: "Receive with simplicity everything that happens to you." Fast forward to the film's long-suffering hero, physics professor Larry Gopnik, who would really like to heed those words, but after entering a world of pain and enduring a series of misfortunes that would put Job to shame, Larry needs answers, not proverbs. What did he do to deserve all this? And why does he seem so suddenly alone in a cruel, cruel world?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2008 | Mary McNamara
A half-hour a day, that's all you need to make a difference. At least that's what the health experts tell us about exercise, and the same is true for HBO's miraculous five-day-a-week series "In Treatment. " As psychoanalyst Paul Weston, Gabriel Byrne has redefined the concept of transference. Though the show follows the therapy of four patients (well, five, since Thursday is devoted to a couple, Jake and Amy), the story is less about the treatment than the doctor. Battling a crush on one patient (Laura, Mondays)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2009
Here are the winners at the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.'
MAGAZINE
March 7, 1999 | Monica Corcoran
"No hurt, no help," says massage therapist Moeul Neak with an infectious, high-pitched giggle. "I'm not kidding." Neak's specialty--"deep tissue to get the blood moving"--has made him the masseur du jour at the tony Burke Williams spa on Sunset Boulevard. Not only is Neak booked two weeks in advance, his clients include Elizabeth Hurley, Gabriel Byrne and D.W. Moffett. But there's no preferential pummeling here.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Ah, monumentally bad movies-- trashio in excelsis. Where would our screen memories be without them? And just in time for a big donation to that memory bank, we have "Siesta" (AMC 14, Century City), hot, awful artiness, with Ellen Barkin as a daredevil sky diver in the grips of an obsessive love. At the heart of any project so awesomely wrongheaded there has to be a big, pretentious conceit, and "Siesta's" screenplay is that, all right.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1995 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
There's a natural diminishment that occurs in the transference of autobiography to movie, just because so much about memoir has to do with personality. And personality on film, as we all know, is the exclusive domain of the actor. So it was Michael Lindsay-Hogg's good fortune to have found and cast Corban Walker and Alan Pentony, two dwarfs who'd never acted before, as the older and younger versions of the title character in "Frankie Starlight."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disregard "Dark Obsession's" trite movie-of-the week title: Lurking behind it is a nifty drama of psychological suspense marking the fiction feature debut of director Nick Broomfield, best known for collaborating with Joan Churchill on such well-respected documentaries as "Tattooed Tears" and "Soldier Girl."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Ralph Bakshi's new animated feature, "Cool World," cartoonist Jack Deebs (Gabriel Byrne) enters into a cartoon world of his own devising. It's a resonant theme: Jack encounters a universe of animated "doodles"--cartoon characters--and gets high on the wildness and strangeness of what popped out of his imagination. This is how all artists must feel at times about their own creations; their imaginary characters are a part of them and yet they're alien, uncontrollable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Trial by Jury," an absorbing and ingenious courtroom drama/lady-in-distress thriller, is all the more entertaining for having successfully made consistently plausible the increasingly improbable. It's the kind of film that requires star authority to bring it off, and it receives it in abundance from Joanne Whalley-Kilmer, in perhaps her best big-screen role since playing Christine Keeler in "Scandal," the 1989 retelling of Britain's Profumo affair.
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