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Gabriel Garcia Marquez

ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez's “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” first published in 1967, is a novel set in a bygone era of Colombian history without much technology to speak of. Now the book itself is finally starting to enter the digital age. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” is not yet available as an e-book. But now you can travel to the fictional Macondo in an audio book, from Blackstone Audio. The Ashland, Ore.-based company has acquired the unabridged audio rights to four works by García Márquez: “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” English translation by Gregory Rabassa; “Love in the Time of Cholera,” translated by Edith Grossman; “No One Writes to the Colonel,” translated by J. S. Bernstein; and “Memories of My Melancholy Whores,” also translated by Edith Grossman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez has been hospitalized in Mexico City, the Associated Press reports . The author, known colloquially as Gabo, is 87 years old. According to some news sources, Garcia Marquez has been hospitalized with pneumonia. His family has asked that no details of his condition be released. He last made a public appearance on March 6, his 87th birthday, outside his Mexico City home. The president of Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto, wished Gabo "a speedy recovery" on his Twitter feed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez, the Nobel laureate who died in Mexico City on Thursday, has been cremated and his ashes could be shared between two countries, according to Mexican media reports . The Colombian novelist spent five decades of his life in Mexico but never gave up his Colombian citizenship. On Friday, Colombia's ambassador to Mexico, Jose Gabriel Ortiz, told reporters gathered outside the late author's Mexico City home that part of his remains might return to Colombia.
BOOKS
June 7, 1987 | Mitch Tuchman, Tuchman is managing editor at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and a ghostwriter.
Miguel Littin, a film maker exiled from Chile in 1973 and subsequently forbidden by the regime of Augusto Pinochet to return, did return in disguise for six weeks in 1985 to film a documentary about life under the present regime. "We particularly wanted to explore the living conditions of the people, their reaction to the dictatorship, and their methods of resistance," he later told his friend, the novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez, recounting the making of the film "Acta General de Chile."
BOOKS
September 16, 1990 | RICHARD EDER
In 1830, Simon Bolivar, the brilliant and paradoxical figure who liberated much of South America from Spain but failed in his dream of keeping it together, resigned his office. With a few loyalists, he journeyed down the Magdalena River to the coast, where he would die a few months later.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Since Gabriel Garcia Marquez first published "Love in the Time of Cholera" internationally in 1988, he is said to have declined, much like a character in one of his books, something on the order of 50 offers to turn the novel into a film. Part of his reluctance to fork over the story to Hollywood apparently stemmed from his misgivings about subjecting one the greatest Spanish-language novels of the 20th century to an English-language adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
After a career that included 11 novels, four collections of short stories and several compilations of journalism, Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez last year gave friends the disappointing news that he had "run out of gas" and was quitting writing. The author was diagnosed with lymphoma in 1999, and after treatment at UCLA Medical Center, he recently was pronounced free of the disease.
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