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Gabriel Rotello

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NEWS
April 1, 1990
"Outing . . . is not confined to dead folks," says Beth Ann Krier, Times staff writer. What follows is her lengthy explanation of what outing means, who it is confined to and what the "specialists" have to say about it. Here are some names mentioned in the article: Malcolm Forbes, Rock Hudson, Roy Cohn, Perry Ellis, Terry Dolan, Larry Kramer, Barney Frank, Gerry Studds, Thomas Foley, Robert Bray, Armistead Maupin, Gabriel Rotello, Paul...
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OPINION
March 27, 1994
Gabriel Rotello's two-part article "Perspective on AIDS" (Commentary, March 9-10) is a candid and rare departure on the grim realities of AIDS that the gay community has, for the large part, stubbornly chosen to ignore while publicly proclaiming otherwise. The costs of AIDS to gay men and lesbians have become too high. First, HIV, the spread of which gays have an enormous amount of control over if they so choose, has taken emotional and fund-raising precedence over the traditional civil rights issues of child custody, job/housing and partner rights.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I was around 9 years old, I somehow got the idea that I was in the vanguard of the sexual revolution. Most of my chums were Roman Catholic girls who still believed they'd been found under cabbage leaves, whereas my mother had told me the facts of life. This made me think of myself as one of the enlightened: a champion of truth, candor, sex, love and other life-affirming forces, a foe of narrow-mindedness and hypocrisy.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a funny little dialogue tossed about by scholars of gay history that goes something like this: Question: Is there such a thing as a gay subculture, and has it had any effect? Answer: No, there is no such thing as a gay subculture and, yes, it has had an enormous effect. In other words, gay culture is a chimera, impossible to pin down. Which, of course, never stops people from arguing about it.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malcolm Forbes, the flamboyant publisher known for his relationships with hot-air balloons and Elizabeth Taylor, had been dead only a week when rumors about his sexual orientation hit the mainstream media. In a USA Today gossip column, Forbes, the divorced father of five children and grandfather of nine, was described as "leading a gay lifestyle for at least the last five years."
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