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Gabriel Ruelas

SPORTS
March 13, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER
Gabriel Ruelas returns to the ring for the first time tonight since losing his World Boxing Council super-featherweight title to Azumah Nelson in December. Ruelas (41-3, 23 knockouts) will face Julio Cesar Herrera (21-2, 19 knockouts) in the 10-round main event at the Olympic Auditorium. In the bout before the loss to Nelson, Ruelas beat Jimmy Garcia so badly that Garcia subsequently died of a brain injury. For some, Ruelas won't be the main attraction tonight.
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SPORTS
March 9, 1996 | Steve Springer
The Ruelas brothers were supposed to make their triumphant return to the ring Wednesday night at the Olympic Auditorium. Instead, the real triumph belongs to Top Rank Boxing matchmaker Bruce Trampler, just for keeping this card together. Rafael Ruelas, trying to bounce back after consecutive losses to Oscar De La Hoya and George Scott, has had to drop out of his bout against Anthony Johnson because of a hand injury he suffered in a sparring session several days ago.
SPORTS
December 9, 1995
As reported by your newspaper ["Pasta, Flu and a Ghost," Dec. 3], I've enjoyed Gabriel Ruelas' many excuses for losing to Azumah Nelson. By the way, when is this excuse coming: that he was soundly beaten by a 37-year-old true champion. Ruelas, the Goossens, the pay-per-view announcers and the promoter wanted the fight to be Ruelas' revenge, but Azumah Nelson's remarkable skills in the ring turned it into his revenge. Hey, Gabriel: Quit being such a cry-baby. JEROLD KRESS Los Angeles
SPORTS
December 3, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly seven months after the title fight in which his punches caused the death of Jimmy Garcia, Gabriel Ruelas faced Garcia in the ring once again Friday night. Saturday morning, Ruelas offered a possible explanation for the vision he saw of Garcia while Ruelas was losing his World Boxing Council super-featherweight title to Azumah Nelson on a fifth-round knockout.
SPORTS
December 2, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man Gabriel Ruelas was fighting Friday night was Azumah Nelson. But the man standing in front of him at the opening bell was Jimmy Garcia, the fighter who died from the punches thrown by Ruelas in his last fight nearly seven months ago. "When the fight started, I saw Jimmy," Ruelas said. "I saw the person I wasn't fighting."
SPORTS
December 1, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The eyes of the boxing world will be on Gabriel Ruelas tonight when he steps into the ring at the Fantasy Springs Casino outside this desert city. Everyone will be watching to see if Ruelas can shake off the trauma of his last fight, which resulted in the death of 23-year-old Jimmy Garcia, and pick up the reins of a promising career.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | Jim Murray
In the summer of 1947, when Sugar Ray Robinson fought Cleveland's Jimmy Doyle, he beat him so badly Doyle collapsed and died. Some days later, at the hearing into the death, the district attorney turned to Ray and asked accusingly, "Couldn't you see he was hurt?" Sugar Ray looked at him resentfully. "Sir," he told him, "it's my business to hurt people." It was, unfortunately, too true. The business of boxing is hurting.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, Gabriel Ruelas kept telling himself, it was all wrong. Jimmy Garcia wasn't supposed to die. He, Ruelas, was the one who was supposed to die young. That's the way it had always been in the dreams. Night after night they would come to him in his restless sleep. The circumstances were different, but the result was always the same. Gabe Ruelas dead before his time. Although he has been a boxer since age 12, he never died in the ring in the dreams. Often it would be in a car accident.
SPORTS
June 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
Boxer Jimmy Garcia could have survived his fight with Gabriel Ruelas if doctors had a way to tell earlier that he was bleeding in the brain, his neurosurgeon said. Because doctors didn't know of the bleeding, the fight continued to the point where there was a massive shift in Garcia's brain, Al Capanna said. "If we would have known that 20 minutes earlier we could have operated and maybe there would have been no damage," he said.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carmen Garcia couldn't take her eyes off Gabriel Ruelas' hands. As he spoke and gestured, she kept her eyes glued to his fists. It was last Monday, the first formal meeting between the two. Ten days earlier, Ruelas had fought her son, Jimmy, the Colombian junior-lightweight champion. Ruelas had won the bout when it was stopped in the 11th round.
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