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Gabriele Muccino

ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | Jan Stuart
When an actor reaches a summit of unparalleled global popularity, it is probably hard to resist the temptation to play God. Will Smith, in all his humanistic narcissism, continues to erect a gallery of Olympian everymen. The soused superhero of "Hancock" and the homeless overachiever of "The Pursuit of Happyness" are canny exemplars of the divinity next door, with warts and all.
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NEWS
December 13, 2006 | TOM O'NEIL
Big names, big pictures THIS year's Oscar race for best director could use some serious direction. It's all over the place! There's a legendary helmer overdue for recognition (Martin Scorsese, "The Departed") squaring off against major emerging artists (Bill Condon, "Dreamgirls"; Todd Field, "Little Children").
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2008 | John Horn
The holiday movie season is filled with high-stakes showdowns -- will Adam Sandler's "Bedtime Stories" topple Brad Pitt's "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" on Christmas Day? -- but few December matchups can compare with Friday's face-off: Will Smith versus Jim Carrey. The actors' movies couldn't be more different. Smith's "Seven Pounds" is a challenging adult drama about an emotionally scarred man on the verge of making a personal sacrifice as a profound act of atonement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2008
If you think it's too early to start sizing up the 2008 Oscar season, consider that it already began in the fall -- at the Telluride and Toronto international film festivals. That's where small specialty films like Sony Pictures Classics' "The Counterfeiters" and Larry Charles and Bill Maher's documentary "Religulous" made their North American debuts. Granted, many of the 2008 contenders have yet to be released, much less promoted by Oscar campaigners.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
The high-concept Jim Carrey projects "Used Guys" and "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" imploded, at least partially, over their excessive budgets. But the comedy "A Little Game Without Consequence," which had Carrey re-teaming with Cameron Diaz and was scheduled to start shooting Thursday, fell apart two weeks ago ostensibly over that most essential of filmmaking tools: the screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Viva Laughlin," which premieres tonight on CBS, is a show in which the characters sometimes sing and dance to pop songs, as if they were suddenly in a musical. It is based on a British miniseries, broadcast here by BBC America as "Viva Blackpool," which in turn took its central conceit from the Dennis Potter-penned avant-TV classics "Pennies From Heaven" and "The Singing Detective" (remade here as films).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
When Peter Berg was hired two weeks ago to direct the 2008 Columbia tent pole "Tonight, He Comes," it represented more than just the hopeful rejuvenation of a long-developing genre-blending superhero project. The assignment also symbolized an act of reconciliation between two highly successful writer-hyphenates.
NEWS
December 10, 2008 | TOM O'NEIL
Arguably the most important Oscars reward those people who write the words we hear in movies, shoot the visual images we see on the screen and weave those together with the actors' performances. There's a lot of real drama in the writing, cinematography and directing races this year. Could a woman be nominated for cinematography for the first time? Could Batman and Iron Man break down other Oscar barriers? DIRECTOR Favorites Darren Aronofsky, "The Wrestler" Danny Boyle, "Slumdog Millionaire" Stephen Daldry, "The Reader" Jonathan Demme, "Rachel Getting Married" David Fincher, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" Ron Howard, "Frost/Nixon" Baz Luhrmann, "Australia" Christopher Nolan, "The Dark Knight" Sam Mendes, "Revolutionary Road" John Patrick Shanley, "Doubt" Gus Van Sant, "Milk" Spotlight: Oscar voters love art-house darlings who cross over to prove they can helm popular hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2003 | Andre Chautard, Special to The Times
One scene of "Tears of the Sun" calls for Monica Bellucci to furiously slap Bruce Willis and spit in his face. The Italian actress was apprehensive, but Willis encouraged her to go for it. "Maybe many women would love to have this honor and I'm the one," Bellucci says, smiling. "I came up with my Italian passion and I did my work." Willis quips, "I get the feeling that she might have slapped somebody before. I don't know." She counters that after a few takes, "he liked it."
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