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Gabrieleno Indians

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994
The cross at Cahuenga Pass, criticized in a March 27 letter to The Times, was erected at the site of the Pilgrimage Theater (now called the John Anson Ford Theater) some 60 years ago. The Pilgrimage was the site for Passion Play presentations. In the 60 years that have passed since the cross first appeared, it has passed from being a symbol of Los Angeles' turn of-the-century dominant Midwestern Protestant ethos and has become a cultural landmark, a link to our past--one of the few still remaining to us who respect the historical Los Angeles where it still hangs on. Los Angeles was indeed founded and settled and repopulated throughout its history by a rich ethnic mix of peoples: Gabrieleno Indians, Spanish, Mexican, Chinese, Yankee, Japanese, Southern Black, Armenian, Korean . . . the list goes on. Many of those peoples left their mark.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1986
Gov. George Deukmejian signed a bill Friday appropriating $195,000 to display Indian artifacts unearthed in the discovery of the "Lost Village of Encino." The artifacts--pottery, stone tools, arrowheads, beads and bones--will be displayed on the second floor of the Garnier House in Los Encinos State Park. They were discovered during construction of an office building at the southeast corner of Ventura Boulevard and Balboa Boulevard, across the street from the park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
There will be a few requisite speeches and a celebratory cake. Then the metal gate will swing open to what all gathered can already see: an expanse of brownish-green hills in a wide canyon carved 18 million years ago by ocean currents. The modest ceremony this coming Friday will mark the opening of the 3,400-acre Aliso and Wood Canyons Regional Park, created two years ago as part of an agreement between Orange County and Mission Viejo Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials on Tuesday approved construction of a Ventura Boulevard project whose proximity to the "Lost Village of Encino" archeological site has embroiled it in controversy and delays. But members of the city Building and Safety Commission, which approved the work, noted that the project was near a known archeological site and ordered that an archeologist and a Native American representative monitor grading to ensure that no Indian artifacts or human remains are destroyed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1995 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular workshop in the early 1970s regularly brought members of Los Angeles' rainbow tribes to a hotel meeting room for a weekend of 12-hour days of racial confrontation. About halfway through, something bordering on the miraculous inevitably occurred. After filling the air with hours of nonstop epithets, accusations, defenses, outrage and tears, the acrimony dissolved in near-uncontrollable laughter.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | JILL GOTTESMAN and JOHN POPE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cal State Long Beach officials said last week that they are abandoning plans to build a temporary parking lot at the site of the campus organic gardens, but they did not back down on their order that the gardeners vacate the land. Although they were told to be off the plot by Wednesday, many of the urban farmers said they will not go and have staked out their gardens with tools, hoses and what is left of their winter chard, broccoli and onions.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | ANN GRIFFITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Each of Sunny Slope Water Co.'s 85,000 customers owns at least one share of stock in the nonprofit firm, with the option to buy more and reduce monthly water bills. But few realize that Sunny Slope, in its 100th year of business, is possibly the oldest municipal water company in Southern California, The company still is based in the same place: a 15-acre spot in Pasadena that bears signs of history long before Sunny Slope was founded. Local historian William A.
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