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NEWS
April 25, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four and a half years ago, former Texas federal Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald found herself sitting in a borrowed meeting room here, sharing a conference table with 10 other foreign judges and a single secretary. "We all just sort of looked at each other and said, 'Now what?' " she recalled.
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OPINION
February 7, 1999 | Kitty Felde, Kitty Felde, a journalist for public radio, is the Friday host of KPCC's "Talk of the City."
She has never held political office. She is not the head of a multimedia entertainment empire. Yet, Gabrielle Kirk McDonald may be the most powerful African American woman in the world. McDonald serves as president--in effect, chief justice--of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and oversees the appeals chamber for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.
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OPINION
February 7, 1999 | Kitty Felde, Kitty Felde, a journalist for public radio, is the Friday host of KPCC's "Talk of the City."
She has never held political office. She is not the head of a multimedia entertainment empire. Yet, Gabrielle Kirk McDonald may be the most powerful African American woman in the world. McDonald serves as president--in effect, chief justice--of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and oversees the appeals chamber for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four and a half years ago, former Texas federal Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald found herself sitting in a borrowed meeting room here, sharing a conference table with 10 other foreign judges and a single secretary. "We all just sort of looked at each other and said, 'Now what?' " she recalled.
NEWS
November 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A former U.S. civil rights lawyer took over the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague. Gabrielle Kirk McDonald, a 55-year-old former law professor and federal judge in Texas, was elected president of the court that was established to bring those who committed wartime atrocities to justice. McDonald said she plans to visit the capitals of Belgrade, Sarajevo and Zagreb to forge "a fresh relationship" with Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian leaders and encourage them to cooperate with the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998
Re "War-Crimes Court Makes a Case for Itself," April 25: Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia is reported to say that conducting the tribunal's first war crimes trial "was like building an airplane, and we didn't know whether it would fly." Then she claims that "it did fly, and it landed safely." There is no doubt about the tribunal's taking off, but it is hard to see how the claim of "landing safely" can be justified while the planners and perpetrators of the most vicious crimes against humanity in Europe since World War II are still at large.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Three judges who will decide whether Dusan Tadic is a sadistic monster or a victim of mistaken identity spent Wednesday learning the historical backdrop to his alleged atrocities in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Throughout the day, prosecutor Grant Niemann stood behind a lectern like a schoolmaster, questioning Balkans specialist James Gow of London University on the ethnic tensions that tore apart the former Yugoslav federation in 1991. The judges, with former U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council on Wednesday authorized the election of three more judges to the international war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslav federation, reflecting the growing number of suspects in custody accused of atrocities committed during the war in the Balkans. The decision follows by a few weeks the expansion of a similar tribunal in Arusha, Tanzania, that is prosecuting suspects in the 1994 genocide of mostly ethnic Tutsis in Rwanda.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1999 | FRANK TORREZ
Today "Today": Kitchen counters; 401(k) plans; John Lithgow; luggage, 5 a.m. KNBC. 717787 "America's Black Forum": The black elite, 1 p.m. KCAL. 15706 "America and the Courts": Memorial ceremony for former Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, 4 p.m. C-SPAN. 15446 "Larry King Weekend": Author Maureen Orth, 6 p.m. CNN. 426077 "McLaughlin Group": Kosovo; China, 6:30 p.m. KNBC. 597 Sunday "Today": Kickboxing; Lynn Redgrave, 6 a.m. KNBC.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Its mission is to bring those responsible for barbaric deeds in the Balkans to justice, but at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the wheels have been grinding with excruciating slowness. It took the Nuremberg trial organized after World War II less than a year to try about two dozen surviving members of the Nazi elite, the overwhelming majority of whom were convicted; a dozen of them were ordered hanged.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first international war crimes trial since the end of World War II began here Tuesday amid a sense of anticipation and history, but with troubling questions hanging in the air and a small-time Bosnian Serb political operator named Dusan Tadic as the lone defendant.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first war-crimes judgment by an international court since Nuremberg, a tribunal Wednesday found a Bosnian Serb cafe owner guilty of crimes against humanity but acquitted him of murder and sexual mutilation. The historic verdict was handed down by a three-judge panel after a yearlong trial, and it marked a milestone in the tormented effort to punish those who committed chilling atrocities during 3 1/2 years of war in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
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