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NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Jon Healey
The presidential race is now officially in dueling gaffe mode, in which the candidates take turns seizing upon a remark their opponent made -- on video, if possible -- and casting it in the worst possible light. Having focused earlier in the week on Republican Mitt Romney's observation that 47% of the country is shiftless and President Obama's (14-year-old) remark in favor of redistributing income, the spotlight Thursday turned to Obama's statement that "you can't change Washington from the inside.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Adele Dazeem, er, Idina Menzel, said that John Travolta's gaffe with her name "threw her" for a few seconds before she performed the Oscar-winning song "Let It Go" at this year's Academy Awards. But only for a few. "I heard it, I did," the 42-year-old "Frozen" star told Savannah Guthrie on the "Today" show Thursday. "I don't want to keep saying it because I don't want him to feel worse or anything, because he sent lots of apologies and everything that were really nice. " Indeed, Travolta has apologized to the Tony-winning songstress beyond his initial statement insisting he'd "been beating myself up" over the blunder, which took on a life of its own on the Internet almost as soon as the muttering left his lips.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
NBC ended the 2012 London Olympics the same way it began them: with another #NBCfail moment, which this time sort of involved Mark Zuckerberg. The network, which during the course of the Olympics earned a hashtag dedicated solely to its failures and mess-ups, continued the trend with one more gaffe on the last day of the Olympics during the men's basketball final on Sunday. The camera turned away from the game during the first quarter and looked at actor Jesse Eisenberg. "I know I'm gonna put that picture on Facebook," said announcer Bob Fitzgerald.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By David Wharton
One man's glitch is another man's gold. Immediately after the producers of the opening ceremony at the Sochi Games suffered their famous malfunction -- four electric snowflakes blossoming into Olympic rings while a fifth remained closed -- a Russian businessman began using the image in advertisements. Now the RBC Daily in Russia reports that Dmitry Medvedev, who is no relation to his country's prime minister, wants to trademark the unintended logo. Medvedev called the four rings "great public relations" and has applied to a Russian patent office because he worries about being sued by Olympics officials.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By David Wharton
One man's glitch is another man's gold. Immediately after the producers of the opening ceremony at the Sochi Games suffered their famous malfunction -- four electric snowflakes blossoming into Olympic rings while a fifth remained closed -- a Russian businessman began using the image in advertisements. Now the RBC Daily in Russia reports that Dmitry Medvedev, who is no relation to his country's prime minister, wants to trademark the unintended logo. Medvedev called the four rings "great public relations" and has applied to a Russian patent office because he worries about being sued by Olympics officials.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The Washington Redskins were eliminated from playoff contention with their 24-17 loss to the New York Giants on Sunday night, and adding to their frustration was an officiating gaffe that's sure to invite NFL scrutiny. With two minutes to play and Washington trailing by a touchdown, the Redskins had a second-and-five at their 36. Robert Griffin III hit Pierre Garcon for a short gain that looked to be just shy of a first down. Redskins Coach Mike Shanahan said later that he asked officials for a measurement and was told by them, “You don't have to; it's a first down.” Sure enough, the crew moved the chains to indicate first down, and Griffin ran a first-down-type play, a long pass to tight end Fred Davis that was dropped.
WORLD
January 17, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - Since Enrique Peña Nieto assumed the post of president here last month, his fellow Mexicans have grown accustomed to his public speaking style, which -- most of the time at least -- is as carefully manicured as his famous pompadour. Each word from Peña Nieto's lips tends to be enunciated with the accent-free precision of a TV newscaster; each idea is limned (no doubt thanks to a passel of talented speechwriters) with a simple clarity that can border on the graceful.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
On a day that was intended to showcase her viability as a top-tier presidential candidate, Michele Bachmann spent Monday evening defending her veracity and explaining a gaffe that seemingly had her mixing up American icon John Wayne with a notorious serial killer. Bachmann found a friendly place to deliver her side of the story: Sean Hannity’s show on Fox News Channel. It became the forum where Bachmann and the news channel patched things up after a brief tiff spurred by Fox newsman Chris Wallace's asking Bachmann last weekend if she was a “flake.” Wallace was pushing Bachmann about whether she stretches the truth, an issue that has begun to trail the Minnesota conservative as even she has showed steady improvement in the polls.
NEWS
November 13, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
"Saturday Night Live" had the last word on Rick Perry's struggles this weekend, stretching his 54-second memory lapse into a nearly six-minute opening sketch. SNL's take actually started by weighing in on the Herman Cain harassment allegations. "The important thing is, for every woman who has come forward, there are two who have not," Keenan Thompson says in his portrayal of the former pizza chain executive. A confident Perry, played by Bill Hader, then predicts he's going to "nail it" in the latest debate.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The Romney campaign may be learning that sometimes the best weapon against an unshakably bad story like "Etch-A-Sketch"-gate is to laugh it off. First, a refresher. Eric Fehrnstrom, one of Mitt Romney's top aides, torpedoed what should have been a gangbusters news cycle for the campaign with this answer to a question about how damaging the primary has been to Romney's chances in November. "I think you hit a reset button for the fall campaign. Everything changes. It's almost like an Etch-A-Sketch.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California's deficit-plagued unemployment insurance program missed out on more than half a billion dollars in federal money in recent years when state officials failed to take advantage of a new federal program. The California state auditor said Thursday that all the Employment Development Department needed to do was invest about $323,000 in computer software modifications to recoup $516 million in money overpaid to people getting jobless benefits between February 2011 and September 2014.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The Washington Redskins were eliminated from playoff contention with their 24-17 loss to the New York Giants on Sunday night, and adding to their frustration was an officiating gaffe that's sure to invite NFL scrutiny. With two minutes to play and Washington trailing by a touchdown, the Redskins had a second-and-five at their 36. Robert Griffin III hit Pierre Garcon for a short gain that looked to be just shy of a first down. Redskins Coach Mike Shanahan said later that he asked officials for a measurement and was told by them, “You don't have to; it's a first down.” Sure enough, the crew moved the chains to indicate first down, and Griffin ran a first-down-type play, a long pass to tight end Fred Davis that was dropped.
SPORTS
October 8, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
Unwelcome North American attention landed exclusively at the skates of goalie Jonathan Quick by virtue of his own-goal gaffe in the Kings' 3-1 loss to the New York Rangers on Monday. Of course, the road to the loss was hardly a one-man show, as Kings defenseman Willie Mitchell correctly noted. "If you watch the game, how well Quickie played. We played like beep in front of him," Mitchell said. "The shift before I think he made three pad saves that were incredible.
WORLD
September 6, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The conservative politician widely expected to emerge as Australia's  prime minister after Saturday's parliamentary elections has mused publicly that it may not be "a bad thing" that men have more power than women. Liberal Party leader Tony Abbott has also scandalized political circles by praising a fellow candidate for her "sex appeal," denounced abortion as "a question of the mother's convenience" and dismissed the notion of climate change as "absolute crap. " Abbott, 55, has been labeled "unelectable" by stalwarts within his own party and was branded by a former U.S. ambassador to Australia -- in a 2010 diplomatic cable made public by WikiLeaks -- as a “polarizing right-winger” with a “propensity for insensitivity and controversy.” But under Australia's parliamentary election system, the party winning a majority of seats chooses the head of government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Bay Area news station KTVU-TV has dismissed three producers in the wake of an anchor reading fake, racially insensitive names for the pilots flying the ill-fated Asiana Airlines Flight 214. San Francisco Chronicle columnists Phillip Matier and Andrew Ross  reported that sources confirmed investigative producer Roland DeWolk, special projects producer Cristina Gastelu and producer Brad Belstock were all fired after an in-house investigation into...
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | By Jim Peltz, Los Angeles Times
The Galaxy hoped to clear one hurdle early this season by getting off to a much better start than last year. The club succeeded — but only in a mediocre way. At this time last year, the Galaxy had a miserable record of 4-8-2 for 14 points. The team then mustered a charge in the latter half of the season and won its second consecutive Major League Soccer championship, followed soon after by star David Beckham's departure for France and Landon Donovan's extended sabbatical. So far this year, the Galaxy is 6-6-2 with 20 points and is holding on to the fifth and last playoff spot in the West.
OPINION
March 6, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
The people who want to drive Rush Limbaugh off the air were not assuaged or persuaded by his apology over the weekend. They say he was not sincere: He only apologized for calling a Georgetown University law student a "slut" and a "prostitute" because of pressure from advertisers. Well of course he wasn't sincere. And of course he was only apologizing to pacify advertisers, which were getting pressure to pressure Limbaugh by these very critics. Oh, there might have been a political calculation too - that he'd gone too far for the good of his ratings or his celebrityhood.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Christi Parsons
A senior presidential aide is supposed to solve problems, not create or compound them for his boss. So the White House was knocked off-stride when Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel was forced to issue a public apology for using a derogatory word for people with learning disabilities. But even before the gaffe, Emanuel was becoming a magnet for criticism of President Obama's difficulties in turning his ambitious agenda into achievements. In an unguarded moment, Emanuel had referred to a group of liberal Democrats as "retarded."
SPORTS
May 27, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Adrian Gonzalez said the Dodgers' 8-7 victory over the Angels on Monday night could change the course of the season. Manager Don Mattingly was also hopeful that would be the case. "That," Mattingly said, "was a good game. " The source of the sudden optimism was the erasing of a 6-1 deficit in the opening game of the Freeway Series at Dodger Stadium, something completely out of character for the last-place Dodgers. Until this night, the largest deficit the Dodgers had overcome on their way to a victory was three runs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
One mark of a competent chief executive - especially one responsible for leading a nation - is an ability to learn from past mistakes. On that count, President Obama's omission of classical music from his second inauguration ceremony on Monday (barring last-minute additions to the announced musical lineup of Beyoncé , Kelly Clarkson and James Taylor singing, respectively, “The Star Spangled Banner,” “My Country 'Tis of Thee” and “America...
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