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Gag Rule

NEWS
January 23, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a stroke of a pen, President Clinton marked the 20th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade on Friday by dismantling a series of Ronald Reagan and George Bush Administration abortion restrictions, only hours after tens of thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators rallied across the street from the White House.
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NEWS
January 22, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton plans to reverse two major Republican anti-abortion policies as early as today, fulfilling key campaign pledges but opening his new Administration to what promises to be bitter controversy. The abortion orders will end the Bush Administration's so-called gag rule, which prohibits abortion counseling by most family-planning clinics, and will lift the ban on research using fetal tissue obtained through abortions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1992
Senator-elect Barbara Boxer has instituted a rule that all news media contacts have to go through the press secretary (Dec. 10). Reporters must "commit" to this rule to be afforded cooperation. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has issued similar orders concerning her office. Boxer says this is not to keep the message straight--it's just to be orderly and efficient. Feinstein's office says it's not a gag rule, it's an office procedure. Are you people--oops, sorry--are reporters going to take this lying down?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Family planning clinics are no longer implementing the controversial "gag rule" on abortion counseling, after a court-ordered delay and the likely prospect that President-elect Bill Clinton will reverse the ban altogether. For clinics in the South Bay, the lifting of the rule has simplified counseling and bookkeeping procedures. "We're thrilled not to have to deal with it anymore.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an Election Day ruling that may doom the controversial "gag rule," which bars federally funded clinics from advising women about abortion, a federal appeals court here blocked further enforcement of the regulation because the Bush Administration failed to seek public comment on the policy. The decision means that the rule cannot be enforced until the Administration conducts a "notice and comment" period, which could take months. But by then, the Bush Administration will be history.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House on Friday upheld President Bush's veto of a bill that would have blocked enforcement of a new rule sharply restricting abortion counseling in federally financed family planning clinics. The 266-148 vote was 10 short of the two-thirds majority needed to override. The House vote came one day after the Senate had voted, 73 to 26, to overturn, and it kept Bush's veto record intact--he has never been overridden.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In another pre-election showdown on a divisive issue, the Senate on Thursday easily overrode President Bush's veto of a bill that would allow federally financed family planning clinics to continue abortion counseling. The 73-26 vote, however, does not prevent federal officials from beginning to enforce the Administration "gag rule" at the estimated 2,000 clinics that receive U.S. funds.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's long-heralded gag order--a regulation that prevents federally funded family planning centers from providing abortion counseling--went into effect Thursday, leaving a bureaucratic ball of confusion for California clinics leading a nationwide fight to thwart the rule.
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