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Gale A Norton

NEWS
August 18, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does it take to motivate homeowners to protect their property from fires? Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton knew that the unfamiliar sound of her own voice probably wouldn't do the trick. So she enlisted such stars as Jackie Mason, Dick Clark and Monty Hall (of "Let's Make a Deal" fame) for new public service spots plugging fire prevention.
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NATIONAL
September 18, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Tuesday called Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton an "unfit" government representative and held her in contempt for failing to follow his order to fix the system that has deprived Native Americans of billions of dollars in royalties. Norton has acknowledged major problems with the trust fund, which was established in 1887 to manage mineral and timber development on lands apportioned to individual Indians and distribute royalties from them. But in his 267-page opinion, U.S.
NEWS
October 19, 2001 | From the Washington Post
When a Senate committee asked Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton questions about caribou in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, she sought answers from the agency in her department that runs the refuge. But when Norton formally replied to the committee, she left out the agency's scientific data that suggested caribou could be affected by oil drilling, while including its data that supported her case for exploration in the refuge, documents show.
NEWS
December 1, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Friday renewed his threat to find Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton in contempt of court but postponed her trial by a week, acknowledging that she has taken a personal role in trying to eliminate mismanagement of the department's Indian trust fund. Native American groups, however, told U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth that they were prepared to begin trial Monday, as originally scheduled. But if civil contempt proceedings are delayed until Dec.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton went on trial Monday on charges of contempt of court, accused by a federal judge of lying to him about her efforts to clean up the long-mismanaged Indian trust fund system. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth ordered testimony to begin about the Interior Department's mishandling of the multibillion-dollar fund, held in trust for 300,000 Native Americans. The trust holds and distributes fees for 54 million acres of land leased for drilling, grazing and logging.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2009 | Jim Tankersley and Josh Meyer
A federal grand jury has subpoenaed records from Royal Dutch Shell PLC as part of a Justice Department investigation into corruption allegations against former Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton, according to sources close to the investigation. The subpoenas and the inclusion of a grand jury are signs of escalation in the investigation, which focuses on whether Norton violated a federal law barring government officials from overseeing any process that could financially benefit a company that the official is negotiating with for future employment.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group of environmental activists that includes some Republicans joined forces Friday to try to derail the nomination of Gale A. Norton, President-elect George W. Bush's designated Interior secretary, claiming that her words and actions should disqualify her for the job. The environmental advocates argued at a news conference here that Norton's basic philosophy is at odds with the mission of the Department of Interior--protecting the nation's public lands.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Tuesday confirmed the two leaders of President Bush's environmental and natural resources team, but the relative ease of their appointment process masks the policy fights that each could face in coming months. Gale A. Norton, 46, confirmed as Interior secretary on a 75-24 vote, is expected to present Congress a plan to begin drilling for oil and gas in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge--a Bush campaign promise sure to set off a pitched battle with environmentalists.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2009 | Jim Tankersley and Josh Meyer
The Justice Department is investigating whether former Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton illegally used her position to benefit Royal Dutch Shell PLC, the company that later hired her, according to officials in federal law enforcement and the Interior Department. The criminal investigation centers on the Interior Department's 2006 decision to award three lucrative oil shale leases on federal land in Colorado to a Shell subsidiary. Over the years it would take to extract the oil, according to calculations from Shell and a Rand Corp.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling California's power panic a wake-up call for the nation, Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton said Thursday that the crisis justifies the need to expand efforts to extract oil, gas and coal from public lands. "I think the energy problems in California are a reality check for a lot of people," Norton said. "People are realizing that we need to plan ahead to have the energy resources available for the long term.
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