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Gale A Norton

NEWS
December 11, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton went on trial Monday on charges of contempt of court, accused by a federal judge of lying to him about her efforts to clean up the long-mismanaged Indian trust fund system. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth ordered testimony to begin about the Interior Department's mishandling of the multibillion-dollar fund, held in trust for 300,000 Native Americans. The trust holds and distributes fees for 54 million acres of land leased for drilling, grazing and logging.
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NEWS
January 31, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Tuesday confirmed the two leaders of President Bush's environmental and natural resources team, but the relative ease of their appointment process masks the policy fights that each could face in coming months. Gale A. Norton, 46, confirmed as Interior secretary on a 75-24 vote, is expected to present Congress a plan to begin drilling for oil and gas in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge--a Bush campaign promise sure to set off a pitched battle with environmentalists.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling California's power panic a wake-up call for the nation, Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton said Thursday that the crisis justifies the need to expand efforts to extract oil, gas and coal from public lands. "I think the energy problems in California are a reality check for a lot of people," Norton said. "People are realizing that we need to plan ahead to have the energy resources available for the long term.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that critics say would undermine a landmark environmental law, the Bush administration is quietly trying to wrest from the courts control over the listing of endangered species and the designation of protected habitat for them. The proposal, buried in the voluminous budget President Bush sent to Congress on Monday, would give Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton wide authority to decide which plants and animals should be protected under the 1973 Endangered Species Act.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For weeks, environmentalists had portrayed her as the political equivalent of a saber-toothed tiger bent on shredding the federal laws and regulations that protect America's natural treasures. But when Interior Secretary-designate Gale A. Norton finally appeared Thursday at her confirmation hearing, she presented a face so moderate and mild-mannered that her potential opponents on the Senate's Energy and Natural Resources Committee were all but disarmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
Interior Secretary Gale Norton will launch a half-century effort Monday to return native trees, fish and wildlife to a lower Colorado River system profoundly altered by man's thirst. Environmental groups are skeptical, however, that the transformation can stick without fundamental changes in the river's flow.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lock and load! That's been the instant response among political activists here as President-elect George W. Bush has assembled his Cabinet-in-waiting. The hot-button selections among his choices have sent a shot of adrenaline through the capital's battling class--with interest groups, politicians and congressional staff scrambling to the barricades to fight or defend the Bush team. Faxes are humming, Web sites are screaming, midnight oil is burning by the gallon.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Interior Department said it evacuated its main headquarters, a few blocks from the White House, because of high asbestos levels. Air monitoring tests during the building's renovation detected asbestos in the cafeteria and mechanical room, which share a ventilation system. About 2,300 workers in the department's main building were dismissed at 11 a.m. Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton was not in the building at the time.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Eighty-seven House members are warning Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton that her agency's plan to transfer ownership of roads across the West to counties or states violates the law, and they are urging her to delay any transfers.
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