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Gale A Norton

NEWS
December 1, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Friday renewed his threat to find Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton in contempt of court but postponed her trial by a week, acknowledging that she has taken a personal role in trying to eliminate mismanagement of the department's Indian trust fund. Native American groups, however, told U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth that they were prepared to begin trial Monday, as originally scheduled. But if civil contempt proceedings are delayed until Dec.
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NEWS
December 11, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton went on trial Monday on charges of contempt of court, accused by a federal judge of lying to him about her efforts to clean up the long-mismanaged Indian trust fund system. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth ordered testimony to begin about the Interior Department's mishandling of the multibillion-dollar fund, held in trust for 300,000 Native Americans. The trust holds and distributes fees for 54 million acres of land leased for drilling, grazing and logging.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Tuesday confirmed the two leaders of President Bush's environmental and natural resources team, but the relative ease of their appointment process masks the policy fights that each could face in coming months. Gale A. Norton, 46, confirmed as Interior secretary on a 75-24 vote, is expected to present Congress a plan to begin drilling for oil and gas in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge--a Bush campaign promise sure to set off a pitched battle with environmentalists.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling California's power panic a wake-up call for the nation, Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton said Thursday that the crisis justifies the need to expand efforts to extract oil, gas and coal from public lands. "I think the energy problems in California are a reality check for a lot of people," Norton said. "People are realizing that we need to plan ahead to have the energy resources available for the long term.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she undertakes to clean up the long-troubled Indian trust fund system, Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton is promising the broadest consultation possible with representatives of Native Americans and other interested parties. Native Americans have repeatedly complained of being kept in the dark about the government's mismanagement of the multibillion-dollar trust fund, which is supposed to benefit about 300,000 tribal members.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2006 | Bettina Boxall and Julie Cart, Times Staff Writers
Guidelines issued by Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton on Wednesday will make it easier for counties to lay claim to old trails and closed roads they would like to open across federal lands in the West, including national parks in Southern California.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton on Wednesday proposed rescinding a plan to reintroduce grizzly bears into the Bitterroot ecosystem of central Idaho and western Montana. Her proposal, if carried out, would roll back yet another Clinton administration environmental action. It is certain to anger environmentalists who believe the Bitterroot initiative is the best strategy for expanding the habitat of the grizzly, a threatened species.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Too late to save many farms, Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton promised Tuesday to release some water to fields in the drought-ravaged Klamath Basin amid conflicting reports over whether there's a surplus in Upper Klamath Lake and whether the water is legally committed to imperiled fish.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that critics say would undermine a landmark environmental law, the Bush administration is quietly trying to wrest from the courts control over the listing of endangered species and the designation of protected habitat for them. The proposal, buried in the voluminous budget President Bush sent to Congress on Monday, would give Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton wide authority to decide which plants and animals should be protected under the 1973 Endangered Species Act.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For weeks, environmentalists had portrayed her as the political equivalent of a saber-toothed tiger bent on shredding the federal laws and regulations that protect America's natural treasures. But when Interior Secretary-designate Gale A. Norton finally appeared Thursday at her confirmation hearing, she presented a face so moderate and mild-mannered that her potential opponents on the Senate's Energy and Natural Resources Committee were all but disarmed.
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