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Gale Hayman

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July 20, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN, Goodwin, a free-lance writer, regularly contributes to The Times fashion pages.
Ten years after she helped create the blockbuster Giorgio fragrance, Gale Hayman has a new perfume, Beverly Hills, on cosmetics counters. If Giorgio was the walloping, knock 'em dead scent that symbolized the assertiveness of the emerging female, Beverly Hills represents a softer woman "who doesn't have to apologize for being strong and also is very aware of maintaining her femininity," Hayman says, adding: "She can run a company wearing pink, if she wants."
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NEWS
July 20, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN, Goodwin, a free-lance writer, regularly contributes to The Times fashion pages.
Ten years after she helped create the blockbuster Giorgio fragrance, Gale Hayman has a new perfume, Beverly Hills, on cosmetics counters. If Giorgio was the walloping, knock 'em dead scent that symbolized the assertiveness of the emerging female, Beverly Hills represents a softer woman "who doesn't have to apologize for being strong and also is very aware of maintaining her femininity," Hayman says, adding: "She can run a company wearing pink, if she wants."
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BUSINESS
April 8, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
In a case of Middle America meets Rodeo Drive, Avon Products said Tuesday it has agreed to buy Giorgio Inc. of Beverly Hills for $185 million in cash. But no, the Avon Lady will not be peddling the $165-per-ounce Giorgio fragrance door to door. Giorgio will be operated as a separate company, selling its women's and men's fragrances and beauty products in 700 stores in the United States, an Avon spokesman said.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
The saga of Giorgio Beverly Hills perfume, arguably the most successful fragrance of the decade, goes on. From the beginning, the tale has been almost too schmaltzy to be true, the type that soap operas are built on. It's a story with a beginning but no end, told so many times already that even its star players refuse to talk about it anymore.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
The saga of Giorgio Beverly Hills perfume, arguably the most successful fragrance of the decade, goes on. From the beginning, the tale has been almost too schmaltzy to be true, the type that soap operas are built on. It's a story with a beginning but no end, told so many times already that even its star players refuse to talk about it anymore.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
It isn't over yet. Not after 10 years of opulence and excess, lawsuits and mudslides, novels, news accounts and TV miniseries. And a painfully public divorce, and the breakup of what was once the most glamorous business in all of Beverly Hills. Giorgio, a true-life page turner, picks up the pace this week.
MAGAZINE
April 23, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
NOT SURPRISINGLY, in a year that has ushered in such '60s looks as the flip and pale lipstick, the newest trend in eye makeup also recalls the mod decade. Black eyeliner--actually, an '80s interpretation of the trademark look of Diana Ross and models Jean Shrimpton and Twiggy--is back. But this time, it didn't start with fashion trend-setters. It started in the streets. Credit kids who were intrigued by the looks that their moms wore in the Summer of Love. Or the way Cher appeared on early album covers with Sonny.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987
The price Avon will pay Fred and Gale Hayman for Giorgio was negotiated downward to $165 million from the $185 million in cash announced in early April. Fred Hayman will buy back the Giorgio boutique and will run it as Giorgio Beverly Hills, the companies said. Giorgio President Michael Gould will remain in that position after the deal closes sometime this week.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1989
Randall L. Herrel has been named chief financial officer of Quiksilver Inc., a Newport Beach sportswear company. A. Lawrence Crowe, who was previously chief financial officer of the company, will continue in the capacity of vice president, secretary and director. Previously, Herrel was executive vice president and chief financial officer of Gale Hayman Beverly Hills, a cosmetic wholesale/retail company. From 1983 to 1988 he was employed by Merle Norman Cosmetics and served as chief financial officer from 1986 to 1988.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN
Andie MacDowell and Mia Farrow are getting high marks for more than their acting skills. Women in particular are taking note of the two leading ladies and their less than perfectly lean bodies. Some cultural observers suggest the appreciation for these rounder figures means the scales are tilting toward change. Not that MacDowell ("Green Card") and Farrow ("Alice") are anywhere near fat.
MAGAZINE
April 23, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
NOT SURPRISINGLY, in a year that has ushered in such '60s looks as the flip and pale lipstick, the newest trend in eye makeup also recalls the mod decade. Black eyeliner--actually, an '80s interpretation of the trademark look of Diana Ross and models Jean Shrimpton and Twiggy--is back. But this time, it didn't start with fashion trend-setters. It started in the streets. Credit kids who were intrigued by the looks that their moms wore in the Summer of Love. Or the way Cher appeared on early album covers with Sonny.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
It isn't over yet. Not after 10 years of opulence and excess, lawsuits and mudslides, novels, news accounts and TV miniseries. And a painfully public divorce, and the breakup of what was once the most glamorous business in all of Beverly Hills. Giorgio, a true-life page turner, picks up the pace this week.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
In a case of Middle America meets Rodeo Drive, Avon Products said Tuesday it has agreed to buy Giorgio Inc. of Beverly Hills for $185 million in cash. But no, the Avon Lady will not be peddling the $165-per-ounce Giorgio fragrance door to door. Giorgio will be operated as a separate company, selling its women's and men's fragrances and beauty products in 700 stores in the United States, an Avon spokesman said.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 1988 | PADDY CALISTRO
RIGHT ABOUT NOW, just before the holiday shopping rush, the catalogue bombardment begins. But this year, catalogues will be filled with more than traditional gift items. Some of them will be offering makeup. According to Maxwell Sroge, a Chicago-based consultant to the direct-mail industry, mail-order sales in America amount to $50 billion a year, and the industry is still growing. "People don't have time to shop," Sroge explains.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1991 | CINDY LAFAVRE YORKS
Never has the idea that less is more made so much sense. At least that's the theory behind one of the latest developments in cosmetics: multi-function products that allow women to buy and carry less makeup--without sacrificing a finished look. Take Clinique's Colour Rub Allover Lustre, whose appeal is flexibility. Designed as an eye shadow, blusher and lip color, the oil-free liquid had been phased out but was brought back because of consumer demand.
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