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December 8, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
It started with a painting of a hunchback. There was something about the image of a misshapen woman in a bright red blouse whose greenish yellow face sank into her chest. Emilie Ester Scheyer, a young German artist, first laid eyes on the painting at a 1916 exhibition in Lausanne, Switzerland, and couldn't get it out of her mind. It made her track down the painter and give up her own artistic career. "Why should I go on painting when I know I can't produce such good art as you?"
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December 8, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
It started with a painting of a hunchback. There was something about the image of a misshapen woman in a bright red blouse whose greenish yellow face sank into her chest. Emilie Ester Scheyer, a young German artist, first laid eyes on the painting at a 1916 exhibition in Lausanne, Switzerland, and couldn't get it out of her mind. It made her track down the painter and give up her own artistic career. "Why should I go on painting when I know I can't produce such good art as you?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
An exhibition of works by painters Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Alexei Jawlensky and Lyonel Feininger, who were known as the Blue Four, opens today at the Long Beach Museum of Art and runs through May 19. The exhibition is dedicated to the memory of Galka Scheyer, who first brought the work of these artists to the West Coast, in 1924. In 1933, when the Nazi regime designated the the Blue Four as "degenerate artists," she returned to Germany and brought back more of their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The Norton Simon Museum is preparing to celebrate a proud but rather obscure chapter of Southern California's art- collecting history. Unlike the oft-lamented litany of treasures that might have been ensconced here but got away, this story is about an important collection that stayed. The heroine is Galka Scheyer, a German-born art patron who settled in Los Angeles in 1928 and promoted the work of the Blue Four--Lyonel Feininger, Alexei Jawlensky, Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The Norton Simon Museum is preparing to celebrate a proud but rather obscure chapter of Southern California's art- collecting history. Unlike the oft-lamented litany of treasures that might have been ensconced here but got away, this story is about an important collection that stayed. The heroine is Galka Scheyer, a German-born art patron who settled in Los Angeles in 1928 and promoted the work of the Blue Four--Lyonel Feininger, Alexei Jawlensky, Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | ART BERMAN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
MOMA to Grow: New York's Museum of Modern Art has bought the neighboring Dorset Hotel and two brownstones in a $50-million transaction that will nearly double the museum's size, a museum spokesperson said Monday. The property was purchased from the estate of developer Sol Goldman after three years of negotiations. The purchase price is being raised by a small group of trustees who wish to remain anonymous, museum director Glenn D. Lowry said.
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June 17, 1994 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
The Norton Simon Museum is readily considered by art mavens to hold the finest art collection amassed in the second half of the 20th Century. "The Norton Simon Museum is certainly one of the great collections of our age," Philippe de Montebello, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, told The Times last June upon the death of the Pasadena museum's founder, Norton Simon, a businessman turned art collector. John Walsh, director of the J.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The way we see art is not fixed. For decades the persistence of Germanic art and artists in Lotusland didn't entirely make sense. Whether it was filmmaker Oskar Fischinger, architects Richard Neutra and Rudolf Schindler or collectors like Galka Scheyer and Robert Gore Rifkind, the Germanic sensibility was at once too rigorous and too passionate for good old fun-loving, laid-back Los Angeles. Now in still economically discouraged, post-riot, fire and quake L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Recent speculation about the destiny of Norton Simon's art collection has obscured at least one important fact: The show goes on at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena. In addition to long-term displays of major works in the collection, five or six temporary exhibitions each year offer periodic glimpses of a cache that is much too large to show all at once in the spacious building. A current pair of exhibitions (on view through July) deals with the development of abstraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
An exhibition of works by painters Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Alexei Jawlensky and Lyonel Feininger, who were known as the Blue Four, opens today at the Long Beach Museum of Art and runs through May 19. The exhibition is dedicated to the memory of Galka Scheyer, who first brought the work of these artists to the West Coast, in 1924. In 1933, when the Nazi regime designated the the Blue Four as "degenerate artists," she returned to Germany and brought back more of their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Is Alexei Jawlensky a major minor artist or a minor major figure in modern art? If there is any argument about the stature of the Russian-born Expressionist, it boils down to such meaningless nitpicks. He wasn't a Picasso or a Matisse, but most critics agree that Jawlensky combined Russian and French traditions in a unique brand of romantic modernism. The history of early 20th-Century art isn't complete without the series of human heads he painted over a period of about 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Beginning in the 1940s the United States enjoyed an artistic flowering that picked up strength through the '60s. There is a justifiable tendency to ascribe this burst of cultural energy to America's ascendancy as a world power after World War II. A friend who likes to dig a bit deeper into paradox insists that none of it would have happened had it not been for Adolf Hitler.
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