Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGalleries
IN THE NEWS

Galleries

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1999 | JASON KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Laguna Beach prides itself on being an artists' colony. But a lawsuit filed this week by a property owner accuses the city of being more a critic than a patron of the arts. The owner is seeking the right to rent out downtown commercial space to the Addi Galleries chain after the City Council last month rejected the proposal, citing an over-concentration of such businesses in the area. Downtown Laguna Beach is home to a dozen galleries--with seven on Forest Avenue, where the property is located.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to bolster its reputation as an arts community, Laguna Beach has begun a monthly art walk through 12 galleries along the northern reaches of Coast Highway. First Thursdays on Gallery Row began recently, and backers hope the event becomes a tradition. Gallery owners have committed to staying open four hours past their usual closing, until 9 p.m., so their artwork gains a bigger audience.
NEWS
September 12, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A sure sign of the new art and culture season in Ventura, and summer's end, comes with the opening of the art galleries at Ventura College. The spaces usually showcase artists visiting from outside the area, giving us something fresh to look at and think about. Last week, the gallery doors opened on two very different shows, in Gallery 2 and New Media Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Los Angeles' gallery scene is perpetually in flux, but the boom of the late 1980s and the bust of the early 1990s set off an unprecedented upheaval. Following a period of rapid growth and decline, Southern California seems to have settled into an interminable recession in which one of the few constant elements is change. With every passing week, however, another gallery opens, even as others move, shrink, merge or close.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | TOMMY LI
After 14 years of running a nonprofit art gallery out of a Downtown warehouse, Lydia Takeshita decided it was time for a change of scenery. Takeshita vacated 3,500 square feet of gallery space in a three-story building on Mateo Street and moved LA Artcore Center to a commercial complex in Little Tokyo on 3rd Street. What eventually drove her away, said the 67-year-old center director, was exactly the same thing that chased her gallery visitors from the area: Downtown blight.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Santa Monica's art scene has sunk further into recessionary gloom with the loss of another gallery. And not just any gallery. James Corcoran--who in 1986 started the city's art gallery boom by moving his prestigious showcase from West Hollywood to the beach--will terminate his exhibition program at the end of February.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | RICHARD ROUILLARD
Studio Leonardogavinci, an art gallery in the mid-Wilshire area, is owned by artists Leonardo Chalupowicz and Gavin Dillard, who also go under the name Leonardogavinci. And, in their spare time, these Leonardogavincis are also animal-rights activists. Last Thursday evening they turned over their gallery to 11 artists who, in various media, celebrated their relationships with other species.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
It's a typical weekday afternoon at the Malibu Country Mart. The weather is perfect. Suntanned women stroll through Henry Beguelin, Madison and Morgane le Fay. Young mothers cluster around the counter at 98% Perfect, buying designer swimwear and shoes for 5-year-olds who would rather be somewhere else. Stylishly scruffy men tend to their BlackBerrys and laptops on the terrace of Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. But on the second floor of a Spanish-style building on one side of the mall, a different kind of action is underway.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the late Nicholas Wilder left Los Angeles for New York in early 1980, the decision to move seemed utterly perverse.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning, the FBI believed that it was investigating a routine case of art theft. One of Carmel's largest art galleries had reported several paintings missing from its walls, and two agents arrived to take a report. They debriefed the staff and then segued to the showroom filled with thundering seascapes and bucolic scenes of French villages. That's when the surprises began.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|