Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGambling Los Angeles County
IN THE NEWS

Gambling Los Angeles County

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1994
Fear of crime, traffic and noise from proposed card clubs in Pomona prompted four neighboring cities and a local citizens group to file a suit against the city. The suit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court by the cities of La Verne, Claremont, Chino and Chino Hills and the Committee Against Card Club Casinos in Pomona, alleges that Pomona violated state law when it approved business licenses and zoning ordinances for the casinos.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1994 | LISA RICHARDSON and JON GARCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With newly trained local dealers ready to hit the tables today, one major hurdle remains for the Hollywood Park Casino card club in Inglewood: to make money, lots of money. Riding on the success of the club are jobs for at least 2,000 residents, as well as fiscal solvency for the city. Inglewood officials have written in a nonexistent $4 million in taxes from the club to balance the 1994-1995 budget.
SPORTS
July 1, 1994 | BOB MIESZERSKI
The Hollywood Park Card Casino is scheduled to open at 1:30 p.m. today. Construction was completed in May but the opening was delayed until the company Hollywood Park chose to operate the facility, Pacific Casino Management, was granted a license by the state a few weeks ago. Pacific Casino Management is headed by former NFL figures Don Klosterman and Eddie LeBaron.
SPORTS
June 18, 1994 | BOB MIESZERSKI
The California Attorney General's office has granted a license to Pacific Casino Management, Inc., the company Hollywood Park has contracted to operate its casino, which will probably open in the first week of July. Pacific Casino Management, Inc., a newly formed corporation headed by Don Klosterman and Eddie LeBaron, will pay Hollywood Park a lease fee.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG
The plan to reopen the Bell casino may be troubled but it is still ticking. Last month, two investor groups pulled out of a deal to open the beleaguered poker parlor and the city has returned a $500,000 deposit to Worldwide Entertainment Centers of Carlsbad and California Casino of Bell, a Los Angeles company. James Knapp, the casino building's owner, has submitted a gaming license application to the city along with a $500 processing fee, said Robert Rizzo, chief administrative officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994
Efforts to open a card club at Hollywood Park racetrack were dealt a setback when the state attorney general's office turned down the application of the club's prospective owner. A Hollywood Park official said plans will continue for the Hollywood Park Casino card club to open this year in a building near the grandstands. The park had planned to lease casino operations to California Casino Management and its president, Edward Allred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1993 | JILL GOTTESMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Bell may have jeopardized plans to reopen a troubled poker parlor by hiring as its monitor of the operation a former mayor who was convicted of felony charges stemming from his hidden interest in the club years ago, state officials said. The city last month hired Peter Werrlein Jr., who managed the once-thriving California Bell Club until he pleaded guilty in 1984 to mail fraud and owning an illegal gambling business. He served 10 1/2 months in federal prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most cities with bingo and card parlors have at least one thing in common: They are content to let a state agency regulate gambling. Not Compton. There, City Council members have created a Gaming Commission, appointed themselves commissioners--and added a generous pay raise. For a total cost to taxpayers of $55,000 a year, council members will meet as commissioners four times a month, 11 months a year. That works out to $250 a meeting, even if no business is on the gaming agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood Park Race Track will try to become a landlord rather than a card club owner and operator now that Gov. Pete Wilson has blocked a bid by the Inglewood track to get its own card club license. Wilson on Monday vetoed a bill that would have allowed the park, a publicly traded corporation, to apply for a card club license. Under California law, only individuals, not corporations with thousands of anonymous stockholders, may hold card club licenses.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|