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Gambling New Mexico

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NEWS
December 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting the stage for a historic clash in court--or possibly on American Indian lands--the 10 tribes operating casinos in New Mexico on Friday rejected a federal order that they close the lucrative operations by Jan. 15 or face forfeiture of their gambling devices.
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NEWS
January 13, 1997 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspected national bookmaking ring that authorities say took in at least $1 million a week in illegal bets was broken up Sunday by a law enforcement task force that arrested 10 people in Los Angeles, Anaheim, Las Vegas and Santa Fe, New Mexico. The arrests occurred shortly before the first of Sunday's two National Football League conference championship games, which traditionally generate millions in legal and illegal betting.
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NEWS
January 11, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religion in the Taos Pueblo flows from a spring-fed lake high in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Here is the center of the universe, say the Taos Indians. It was at Blue Lake, they say, that the Great Spirit created humans, as well as the final resting place of souls. Today the sacred watershed is protected by slot machines. In 1970, the cash-poor Taos Pueblo won a 64-year legal battle to restore tribal title to the lake.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that New Mexico's Indian casinos are illegal but may remain open temporarily. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver affirmed the ruling of a lower court that the 1995 state-tribal compacts that authorized the casinos were invalid. But the 32-page order included a stay "pending final resolution of this matter, either in this court or the United States Supreme Court" that would allow the 11 casinos to remain open.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that New Mexico's Indian casinos are illegal but may remain open temporarily. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver affirmed the ruling of a lower court that the 1995 state-tribal compacts that authorized the casinos were invalid. But the 32-page order included a stay "pending final resolution of this matter, either in this court or the United States Supreme Court" that would allow the 11 casinos to remain open.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Martha Vazquez in Santa Fe ruled that casinos on Indian reservations in New Mexico can remain open while an appeals court considers whether they are operating illegally, attorneys said. The decision averted a showdown between 11 tribes and federal agents preparing to enforce a court order that would shut the casinos. Tribal attorney Richard Hughes called on legislators to endorse an agreement between the tribes and Gov. Gary Johnson that initially allowed the casinos to open.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. attorney in New Mexico on Friday suspended his ultimatum to seize American Indian gambling assets on Monday, in return for a promise from tribal leaders to drop a lawsuit against such a move and not to blockade vital state highways. U.S. Atty. John Kelly and nine tribes operating casinos ended their standoff in order to allow a federal judge to rule on the legality of compacts signed by Republican Gov. Gary Johnson that permitted Las Vegas-style gambling on the reservations.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspected national bookmaking ring that authorities say took in at least $1 million a week in illegal bets was broken up Sunday by a law enforcement task force that arrested 10 people in Los Angeles, Anaheim, Las Vegas and Santa Fe, New Mexico. The arrests occurred shortly before the first of Sunday's two National Football League conference championship games, which traditionally generate millions in legal and illegal betting.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Martha Vazquez in Santa Fe ruled that casinos on Indian reservations in New Mexico can remain open while an appeals court considers whether they are operating illegally, attorneys said. The decision averted a showdown between 11 tribes and federal agents preparing to enforce a court order that would shut the casinos. Tribal attorney Richard Hughes called on legislators to endorse an agreement between the tribes and Gov. Gary Johnson that initially allowed the casinos to open.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. attorney in New Mexico on Friday suspended his ultimatum to seize American Indian gambling assets on Monday, in return for a promise from tribal leaders to drop a lawsuit against such a move and not to blockade vital state highways. U.S. Atty. John Kelly and nine tribes operating casinos ended their standoff in order to allow a federal judge to rule on the legality of compacts signed by Republican Gov. Gary Johnson that permitted Las Vegas-style gambling on the reservations.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religion in the Taos Pueblo flows from a spring-fed lake high in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Here is the center of the universe, say the Taos Indians. It was at Blue Lake, they say, that the Great Spirit created humans, as well as the final resting place of souls. Today the sacred watershed is protected by slot machines. In 1970, the cash-poor Taos Pueblo won a 64-year legal battle to restore tribal title to the lake.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting the stage for a historic clash in court--or possibly on American Indian lands--the 10 tribes operating casinos in New Mexico on Friday rejected a federal order that they close the lucrative operations by Jan. 15 or face forfeiture of their gambling devices.
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