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NEWS
January 3, 1994 | Associated Press
Competition from new Mississippi Gulf Coast casinos is hurting fund raising for New Orleans' Carnival, Mardi Gras organizers say. Krewes, the clubs that sponsor Mardi Gras activities, often rely on high-rolling bingo players to help pay for tractors, insurance, costumes and bands. But krewes say bingo revenue is off at least 50% and that a few of the clubs might not be able to pull off parades.
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NEWS
January 3, 1994 | Associated Press
Competition from new Mississippi Gulf Coast casinos is hurting fund raising for New Orleans' Carnival, Mardi Gras organizers say. Krewes, the clubs that sponsor Mardi Gras activities, often rely on high-rolling bingo players to help pay for tractors, insurance, costumes and bands. But krewes say bingo revenue is off at least 50% and that a few of the clubs might not be able to pull off parades.
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NEWS
June 5, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gambling fever rages across the South, and a lot of people would like to cash in on it. But, in the meantime, driving across state lines will remain the only way to wager for many Southern gamblers. In a continuing, intricate pattern of play, people from states with no legalized lotteries or horse and dog races dash to neighboring states that do allow such gambling. Georgians, in droves, flock to Florida to play the state lottery and to Alabama to bet on the dogs.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gambling fever rages across the South, and a lot of people would like to cash in on it. But, in the meantime, driving across state lines will remain the only way to wager for many Southern gamblers. In a continuing, intricate pattern of play, people from states with no legalized lotteries or horse and dog races dash to neighboring states that do allow such gambling. Georgians, in droves, flock to Florida to play the state lottery and to Alabama to bet on the dogs.
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