Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGarbage Music Group
IN THE NEWS

Garbage Music Group

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a freelance writer based in New York
When contemporary rock producer ne plus ultra Butch Vig and his fellow studio rats first spotted the tall, striking redhead Shirley Manson in a video on MTV's "120 Minutes" last year, it was love at first . . . sound. At the time, Manson was fronting a band called Angelfish, but Vig, Duke Erikson and Steve Marker had other plans in mind for the Scotswoman. They were forming a band called Garbage, and they needed a singer. Manson's dusky, insinuating vocals sounded perfect.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
There's nothing like creative tension to bring out the best in a band. Personal and personnel problems have crafted hits for bands from Fleetwood Mac ("Rumours" arguably being the best-known result of a group whose internal strife led to commercial success) to the Police. Add to that long list Garbage and its latest album, "Bleed Like Me," a work whose scars are so vividly painted in music that the songs feel like fresh scabs.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1999 | SANDY MASUO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The math behind pop success is simple: Captivating bands are always greater than the sum of their parts. And, in the case of Garbage, that's a pretty dynamic equation. Front and center is Shirley Manson, a Scottish chanteuse armed with some of the sharpest, sultriest sentiments this side of the Pretenders' first two albums.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1999 | SANDY MASUO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The math behind pop success is simple: Captivating bands are always greater than the sum of their parts. And, in the case of Garbage, that's a pretty dynamic equation. Front and center is Shirley Manson, a Scottish chanteuse armed with some of the sharpest, sultriest sentiments this side of the Pretenders' first two albums.
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
There's nothing like creative tension to bring out the best in a band. Personal and personnel problems have crafted hits for bands from Fleetwood Mac ("Rumours" arguably being the best-known result of a group whose internal strife led to commercial success) to the Police. Add to that long list Garbage and its latest album, "Bleed Like Me," a work whose scars are so vividly painted in music that the songs feel like fresh scabs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a freelance writer based in New York
When contemporary rock producer ne plus ultra Butch Vig and his fellow studio rats first spotted the tall, striking redhead Shirley Manson in a video on MTV's "120 Minutes" last year, it was love at first . . . sound. At the time, Manson was fronting a band called Angelfish, but Vig, Duke Erikson and Steve Marker had other plans in mind for the Scotswoman. They were forming a band called Garbage, and they needed a singer. Manson's dusky, insinuating vocals sounded perfect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|