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NEWS
June 23, 1988 | SUSAN PERRY, Perry is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Members of the San Fernando Valley's gardening societies and clubs share more than a green thumb. Many of them care deeply about conserving natural resources. "We're not little old ladies in big gardening hats with a shovel in our hands," said Estelle Tesh, director of the San Fernando Valley District of California Garden Clubs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh
Karen Segura dug her hands deep into the soil of an onion patch at Bell Gardens Intermediate School as cars zipped past the nearly empty schoolyard. The 14-year-old was busy uprooting weeds in the school's edible garden, while around her five other students watered, tilled and pruned a lush assortment of fruits and vegetables. There were tomatoes, avocados, apples, pineapples, pumpkins, zucchinis, lavender, lettuce, Swiss chard and artichokes. Every public school in Bell Gardens has just such an urban farm run by members of the Environmental Garden Club, an after-school program that started at the intermediate school and now includes a rotating roster of 8- to 18-year-olds.
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NEWS
June 18, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the five women were planting flowers at the new City Hall here the lawn sprinklers suddenly went on. The women screamed and ran. They were drenched. "You never know what's going to happen next," laughed Bernice Butler, 84. The women belong to the Desert Planters, a local garden club whose 35 members, mostly women between 65 and 85, have a goal "to make Ridgecrest the most beautiful desert city on earth by the year 2013."
HOME & GARDEN
February 20, 2010 | Deborah Netburn
  Gene Bauer has planted close to a million daffodil bulbs in the hills behind her home in the San Bernardino Mountains. For 40 years, she opened her property for three weeks each spring, free of charge, so the public could bask in the glory of all that yellowness, in the passion and hard work of a woman intent on making the world a more beautiful place. Bauer said the people who flocked to her home each year were generally polite and respectful. But she's 83 now, and preparing the property for visitors has become too much to handle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1994 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath a towering row of power lines, a meeting of nations is taking place at the Arleta Community Garden Club. Anna Simone, 70, of Sun Valley is hacking away some devil's grass from neatly tended plots where she is growing fava beans, escarole, dandelions and that most Italian of vegetables--tomatoes. "I show you a tomato!" says the vigorous Simone, pointing to the product of a handful of seeds she brought back from Italy last year. "I like this work."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON
In honor of Arbor Day, local garden clubs will host free tours and talks in the Conejo Valley Botanic Garden in Thousand Oaks on Sunday. After two tree-planting ceremonies--scheduled for 1 p.m. and 2 p.m--members of the Conejo Valley and Westlake garden clubs will take visitors through the Botanic Garden, showing them an orchard of rare fruit trees, a butterfly garden and many varieties of native plants. A family tour is scheduled for 3 p.m., and a general tour will start at 3:30 p.m..
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
Representatives of a group of urban gardeners reached a tentative agreement Friday with the city Department of Water and Power that could allow many to continue raising produce, which they say is an essential supplement to their diets and income. The agreement was reached just hours after scores of gardeners brandished cornstalks and squash in front of a DWP office to protest an ultimatum to pay more for water or vacate land they have tilled for 17 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Faced with loss of their crops, urban gardeners who raise food under power lines in Arleta agreed under protest Tuesday to accept terms imposed by the Department of Water and Power. The pact allows members of the Arleta Community Garden Club, many of them senior citizens or low-income residents, to farm a 5.5-acre community garden they have nurtured for 17 years. "We're right in the middle of the growing season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Faced with the loss of their crops, urban gardeners who raise food under power lines in Arleta agreed "under protest" Tuesday to accept terms imposed by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. The agreement allows members of the Arleta Community Garden Club, many of them senior citizens or low-income residents, to continue farming a 5.5-acre community garden that they have nurtured for 17 years. "We're right in the middle of the growing season.
HOME & GARDEN
November 3, 1990 | JEAN MARBELLA, THE BALTIMORE SUN
This is one of those haywire years when the 90-degree weather came before the tomatoes were a glimmer in the gardener's eye. But whither the weather, gardening is enjoying record popularity, surveys show, with seemingly every patch of ground, every bit of balcony and every box on every window being tilled to within an inch of its life.
HOME & GARDEN
February 6, 2010 | By Laura Randall
It was a Sunday afternoon in 1974 when a black-suited Claretian missionary known as Father Pat walked into the monthly meeting of the Long Beach Cactus Club looking to make a deal. Turn the sunny dirt patch next to his home at Dominguez Rancho Adobe into a cactus garden, Father Patrick McPolin said, and you can use the state historic site's carriage house for all of your future meetings. Members of the club, who had been convening in a small room at the Angelo M. Iacoboni Library in Lakewood, didn't think twice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2009 | Bob Pool
After more than 50 years of toil in surprisingly difficult soil, the Malibu Garden Club is slowly withering on the vine. This time the threat is not drought or alkaline dirt or a pesky aphid infestation. The clock is simply running out for those in the pioneering horticulture group, who are looking for new members.
MAGAZINE
May 11, 2003 | Susan Heeger
Growing up in a city means never having to milk cows, pick corn or sweep the barn when you'd rather be skating. But there are disadvantages, too. You might think bread grows in a package, or question the point of a worm's existence. And if you knew what fun it was, you might want to turn kitchen scraps into compost or tend your own geranium. Which is why Pilgrim, an ecumenical K-through-12 private school in L.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Stolarik strolled down the path of his community garden, checking for wayward berry bushes, rotten tomatoes and the biggest scourge of all--weeds. First he spotted a sunflower exceeding the six-foot maximum. Then a mammoth zucchini too plump to possibly be edible. "That's not right," said the 81-year-old garden cop. "That's just plain old neglect." Citations will be forthcoming.
HOME & GARDEN
May 5, 2001
EVENTS The 12th annual Southern California Spring Garden show. Through Sunday. South Coast Plaza, Crate and Barrel/Macy's Home Store Wing, 3333 Bear St., Costa Mesa. Parking and admission are free. Today, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Call (800) 782-8888 or go to http://www.southcoastplaza.com. Arboretum Plant Sales. Every Saturday and Sunday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fullerton Arboretum, 1900 Associated Road. (714) 278-3579. Herb Society's Annual Tea Party. Sunday. 1 p.m.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | ROGER ALFORD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
What happens when the garden club takes over the government of a Kentucky coal town? Think bake sales instead of tax increases, benefit concerts instead of bond measures and a thrift shop instead of fiscal belt tightening. "We've paid for a new $26,000 police car, a $145,000 fire truck, a $58,000 garbage truck and a $30,000 dump truck," said Mayor Betty Howard. "We couldn't have done it without the shop."
HOME & GARDEN
October 24, 1998 | SHARON WHATLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Which 10 flowers would I choose to take to a lonely island? My answer: 10 tulips. --Victor Borge * I recently engaged in a lively debate over the established custom of private men's clubs--havens where one can talk politics, enjoy a whiskey and a cigar, in addition to letting all that testosterone circulate. The question arose: What about private clubs for male gardeners? Surprisingly, they already exist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget aphids, leaf rot and snails. The Arleta Garden Club is trying to swat down what it claims is a worse pest--the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. But the DWP says it's the garden club that's the root of the problem. The two are haggling over the terms of an agreement that will determine if the club continues farming two acres of right of way under the DWP's high-voltage transmission lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1999 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government announced Thursday that it has sold its controlling interest in the Bicycle Club in Bell Gardens, nine years after seizing control because of money laundering at the card club. A partnership that operates a successful card club in Oceanside has agreed to purchase the government's interest for an undisclosed amount and plans to renovate the casino, the second-largest club in the state. The sale is a huge relief to federal officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call this place Esperanza--Spanish for "hope." Here, a garment worker tends his stalks of corn, dreaming of his old farm in Mexico. A retired attorney picks fragrant shoots of rosemary to use for dinner. A teacher weeds at dusk, turning over the soil as the hum of the city fades with nightfall. They work the land side by side. They fight the same weeds. They celebrate harvests together. And these days, they are sadly gathering in the winter crop, knowing it will be the last.
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