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Garment Industry Suits

BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guess Inc. and 16 of its contractors were accused of cheating employees out of wages, condoning illegal child labor and other abuses in a suit filed Wednesday by immigrant garment workers in Los Angeles. The lawsuit, backed by the garment industry union Unite, is a new salvo in the labor organization's battle against Guess, the biggest manufacturer in Southern California's apparel industry. Named as plaintiffs were five Latino garment workers who have been employed by Guess contractors.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Y.C. Tsai Sewing Enterprises Inc. has been ordered by a federal judge to pay 19 workers $119,000 in back wages and damages. Tsai Sewing, at 2420 Cape Cod Way in Santa Ana, assembles men's and boys' shirts and shorts for beachwear. The federal Department of Labor sued Tsai Sewing after an investigation. In a default judgment, a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles ordered the firm to pay $59,395 in unpaid minimum wage and overtime pay and an equal amount in damages.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potentially groundbreaking legal victory for laborers in the abuse-ridden apparel industry, 19 Los Angeles garment workers who claimed they were denied minimum wages and overtime pay have won a judgment of $805,676 against their former employers. Federal and state officials called it one of the nation's biggest back-pay awards ever in a garment industry case, and perhaps the largest in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994 | BOB POOL
A Los Angeles jury got to the bottom of the glow-in-the-dark panties controversy Monday, leaving a local garment manufacturer $175,000 lighter. Phosphorescent lingerie inventor Mark Graham was awarded compensatory damages from underwear maker Joe Hara as jurors ruled that Hara had stolen Graham's idea for glowing bras and bustiers. But the Superior Court panel paused only briefly before refusing to award punitive damages to Graham--now a 41-year-old Nashville songwriter.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1997 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Limited Inc.--owner of Victoria's Secret, among other specialty apparel chains--secretly mislabeling Chinese-made garments to evade U.S. import quotas? That's the accusation made by a textile manufacturers' group in a lawsuit--which has wide implications for the future course of U.S. trade policy--filed recently in Los Angeles federal court.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Fashion giant Calvin Klein Inc. is suing Warnaco Group Inc., alleging that the maker of its underwear and jeans lines violated the designer's trademarks and improperly sold merchandise. The lawsuit, which was filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in New York, seeks to end all agreements between the two companies, both based in New York. It also seeks to recoup Warnaco's profit from improper sales and asked for unspecified compensatory damages.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1991 | From United Press International
Seattle Clothing Designer Sues Competitor: The designer of the Seattle Gear clothing line sued a Los Angeles competitor for alleged trademark infringement, false advertising and unfair competition. In the federal suit, designer Deborah Ann Daley contends that Malibu West illegally copied her T-shirts, stirrup pants, jumpsuits and "bomber" jackets. In addition to an order halting Malibu West's production of the clothing line, the suit seeks unspecified damages. (Case No. 91-0036. Filed Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1991
The owner of a Silver Lake garment manufacturing shop has been ordered to pay $1,600 in overtime wages to 23 employees to settle a lawsuit filed against the company by the U. S. Department of Labor. U. S. District Judge Stephen Wilson ordered Ambartsoum Palian, the owner of Tereza Manufacturing Co.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine sportswear maker Mossimo Inc. said Tuesday it will pay $13 million to settle state and federal class-action lawsuits alleging it misled investors with falsely optimistic financial statements and progress reports. Company chairman Mossimo Giannulli disputes the allegation that Mossimo deceived shareholders, but said the deal would remove uncertainty at a time when the clothier is trying to retrench. "It's been an absolute distraction," he said. "We wanted to move on."
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