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Garrett Hardin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Garrett Hardin, a leading ecological thinker whose contrarian stands have influenced debates on abortion, immigration, foreign aid and other prickly issues, apparently took his own life Sunday. He was 88 and was found dead, along with his 81-year-old wife, Jane, at their Santa Barbara home.
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OPINION
September 24, 2003
What an interesting coincidence to read about the torching of a new home development in San Diego and Hummer SUVs in the San Gabriel Valley and then read the obituary of Garrett Hardin, the distinguished UC Santa Barbara ecologist (Sept. 20). Hardin's 1968 essay, "The Tragedy of the Commons," clarified the inevitability of tragic circumstances if individuals each approach commonly held, finite resources as if they were inexhaustible. Might the radically idealistic members of the Earth Liberation Front who claim a role in these crimes be canaries in the coal mine for the tragic events Hardin predicted?
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BOOKS
August 25, 1985 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
The book is much better than its title, and the argument is much deeper than its gimmick. The gimmick--or filters--has to do with three varieties of intellectual activity: a literate filter for the precise understanding of words; a "numerate filter" for matters of how much and proportions; and an "ecolate filter" permitting a person to judge in terms of time. "And then what?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Garrett Hardin, a leading ecological thinker whose contrarian stands have influenced debates on abortion, immigration, foreign aid and other prickly issues, apparently took his own life Sunday. He was 88 and was found dead, along with his 81-year-old wife, Jane, at their Santa Barbara home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992
In response to "Economic Growth Can't Continue but There Is No End to Development," Opinion, April 12: Prof. Donella Meadows set out for "Truth or Consequences" and ended up in Disneyland. She stated the plain truth that human population and its demands have already exceeded Earth's limited supply of resources, then she dodged the obvious question and issued a mild warning. The hard question she evaded was asked by Garrett Hardin years ago: "How can we control population without recourse to repugnant measures?"
OPINION
September 24, 2003
What an interesting coincidence to read about the torching of a new home development in San Diego and Hummer SUVs in the San Gabriel Valley and then read the obituary of Garrett Hardin, the distinguished UC Santa Barbara ecologist (Sept. 20). Hardin's 1968 essay, "The Tragedy of the Commons," clarified the inevitability of tragic circumstances if individuals each approach commonly held, finite resources as if they were inexhaustible. Might the radically idealistic members of the Earth Liberation Front who claim a role in these crimes be canaries in the coal mine for the tragic events Hardin predicted?
BOOKS
August 15, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
LIVING WITHIN LIMITS: Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos by Garrett Hardin (Oxford University Press: $25; 339 pp.). Garrett Hardin, emeritus professor of human ecology at UC Santa Barbara, reports that he felt "splendidly original" in 1963 when he asserted in a scientific journal that "we can never do merely one thing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1987
Much has been written and argued both pro and con regarding the abortion battle between anti-abortion and pro-abortion forces, but the most intelligent and comprehensive arguments for a woman's right to control her reproductive function was presented by Garrett Hardin in his article, "Life Begins Once About 3 Billion Years Ago" (Op-Ed Page, Sept. 27). As Hardin so precisely concluded, the term unborn children in its "identification is both biological and linguistic nonsense. Unborn child is an oxymoron."
BOOKS
March 16, 1986
I have long been convinced that the publishing industry includes some of the worst-run businesses in the country. I was reminded of this when a friend alerted me to a problem with my book, "Filters Against Folly: How to Survive Despite Economists, Ecologists, and the Merely Eloquent." When my friend had tried to buy several copies, his bookstore told him that the book was out of print. Subsequently, three strangers from different parts of the country phoned me with similar reports. Since it was only six months after the publication date, considering that the book was not a runaway best-seller, I found the reports hard to believe.
BOOKS
December 25, 1994
Regarding "So Many Americans . . . How Shall We Feed Them?", reviews by Philip Shabecoff and Marc Lappe (Nov. 27): Over-population is a serious world-wide problem. However in the case of the United States, which has a population density one-quarter of Europe, it is not the apocalyptic disaster as suggested by the book "How Many Americans." We had slums and inner-city decay when the population was 150 million. We neglected the problem then and we have been neglecting the problem ever since; and as usual we find scapegoats for the problem--this time it is immigration.
BOOKS
December 25, 1994
Regarding "So Many Americans . . . How Shall We Feed Them?", reviews by Philip Shabecoff and Marc Lappe (Nov. 27): Over-population is a serious world-wide problem. However in the case of the United States, which has a population density one-quarter of Europe, it is not the apocalyptic disaster as suggested by the book "How Many Americans." We had slums and inner-city decay when the population was 150 million. We neglected the problem then and we have been neglecting the problem ever since; and as usual we find scapegoats for the problem--this time it is immigration.
BOOKS
August 15, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
LIVING WITHIN LIMITS: Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos by Garrett Hardin (Oxford University Press: $25; 339 pp.). Garrett Hardin, emeritus professor of human ecology at UC Santa Barbara, reports that he felt "splendidly original" in 1963 when he asserted in a scientific journal that "we can never do merely one thing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992
In response to "Economic Growth Can't Continue but There Is No End to Development," Opinion, April 12: Prof. Donella Meadows set out for "Truth or Consequences" and ended up in Disneyland. She stated the plain truth that human population and its demands have already exceeded Earth's limited supply of resources, then she dodged the obvious question and issued a mild warning. The hard question she evaded was asked by Garrett Hardin years ago: "How can we control population without recourse to repugnant measures?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989
Garrett Hardin ("Khomeini Discolors Vision of One World," Op-Ed Page, March 22) argues that a single world state would inevitably destroy freedom of speech anywhere on the planet. He cites as evidence the works by Lawrence and Joyce which were first released in foreign countries because "passionate minorities" prevented home publication. To Hardin, the Ayatollah Khomeini's death sentence against Salman Rushdie is a similar phenomenon, and in a One World state powerful minorities like Khomeini would prevent the worldwide expression of views disagreeable to them because the authors would have "nowhere else to go."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1987
Much has been written and argued both pro and con regarding the abortion battle between anti-abortion and pro-abortion forces, but the most intelligent and comprehensive arguments for a woman's right to control her reproductive function was presented by Garrett Hardin in his article, "Life Begins Once About 3 Billion Years Ago" (Op-Ed Page, Sept. 27). As Hardin so precisely concluded, the term unborn children in its "identification is both biological and linguistic nonsense. Unborn child is an oxymoron."
BOOKS
March 16, 1986
I have long been convinced that the publishing industry includes some of the worst-run businesses in the country. I was reminded of this when a friend alerted me to a problem with my book, "Filters Against Folly: How to Survive Despite Economists, Ecologists, and the Merely Eloquent." When my friend had tried to buy several copies, his bookstore told him that the book was out of print. Subsequently, three strangers from different parts of the country phoned me with similar reports. Since it was only six months after the publication date, considering that the book was not a runaway best-seller, I found the reports hard to believe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989
Garrett Hardin ("Khomeini Discolors Vision of One World," Op-Ed Page, March 22) argues that a single world state would inevitably destroy freedom of speech anywhere on the planet. He cites as evidence the works by Lawrence and Joyce which were first released in foreign countries because "passionate minorities" prevented home publication. To Hardin, the Ayatollah Khomeini's death sentence against Salman Rushdie is a similar phenomenon, and in a One World state powerful minorities like Khomeini would prevent the worldwide expression of views disagreeable to them because the authors would have "nowhere else to go."
NEWS
December 23, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Practitioners of the writing game are generous in support of literary colleagues. They network, read each others' manuscripts, share agent and publisher information, and turn out for author signings. Robert James Waller, author of "The Bridges of Madison County" (No. 1 bestseller, still selling in the millions) appeared at Tecolote Bookshop in Montecito to sign his new novel, "Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend," which is No. 2 on the bestseller list.
BOOKS
August 25, 1985 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
The book is much better than its title, and the argument is much deeper than its gimmick. The gimmick--or filters--has to do with three varieties of intellectual activity: a literate filter for the precise understanding of words; a "numerate filter" for matters of how much and proportions; and an "ecolate filter" permitting a person to judge in terms of time. "And then what?"
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